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As TV Quality Rivals Film, Showrunners Must Stop Being Embarrassed By the Small Screen

As TV Quality Rivals Film, Showrunners Must Stop Being Embarrassed By the Small Screen
The “Game of Thrones” creators sparked debate last month at a SXSW panel with the comment that they viewed their hit HBO show as a “73-hour movie.” It’s a common conceit for showrunners to believe that calling what they do “cinematic” is a mark of quality. And there are plenty of cinephiles and prominent movie critics, like the New Yorker’s Richard Brody, who haven’t been shy about what they believe are the limits of television as a medium.

However, “cinematic” is sloppy — for television and for movies. It’s become a hat tip to pretty lighting, majestic backdrops, and lavish sets, stylized camera movement and composition, or a sense of scale — epic battles, explosive visual effects, sweeping tales – that “deserve the big screen.”

David Fincher can probably make something cinematic shooting a short in our conference room with a $500 camera on a tripod. That is to say:
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Knick’ Not Moving Forward With More Seasons

‘The Knick’ Not Moving Forward With More Seasons
It’s the end of the road for “The Knick.”

The Cinemax medical drama from Steven Soderbergh will not return for a third season, sources tell Variety.

The Knick” last aired in December 2015, wrapping up its second season by seemingly killing off its main character, lead by star Clive Owen. However, Variety was first to report that a script and outline for Season 3 had been ordered with creators Michael Begler and Jack Amiel both set to return as executive producers and writers.

Insiders say that at one point, discussions were had for a double-renewal that would take the series through a third and fourth season, which would move to an entirely new time period with an entirely new cast, but set in the same hospital. The idea was for the show to have jumped 20 years ahead to the 1920’s for Season 3, and then jump forward another 20 years for subsequent seasons., showing
See full article at Variety - TV News »

What Canceled TV Shows Most Deserve a Better Ending? — IndieWire Critics Survey

What Canceled TV Shows Most Deserve a Better Ending? — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: If you could give one canceled show one extra season (if only to wrap things up in a better way), which would it be?

Daniel Fienberg (@TheFienPrint), The Hollywood Reporter

It wasn’t that we were watching “Hannibal” just to see Bryan Fuller and company get to the events of “Silence of the Lambs,” but that was sure a fun thing looming on the horizon. The “Manhunter”/”Red Dragon” arc was probably the show’s most conventional, but it was all the more intriguing for that odd disconnect, of a frequently told story going through the mind of one of TV’s most original storytellers and
See full article at Indiewire Television »

What Canceled TV Shows Most Deserve a Better Ending? — IndieWire Critics Survey

What Canceled TV Shows Most Deserve a Better Ending? — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: If you could give one canceled show one extra season (if only to wrap things up in a better way), which would it be?

Daniel Fienberg (@TheFienPrint), The Hollywood Reporter

It wasn’t that we were watching “Hannibal” just to see Bryan Fuller and company get to the events of “Silence of the Lambs,” but that was sure a fun thing looming on the horizon. The “Manhunter”/”Red Dragon” arc was probably the show’s most conventional, but it was all the more intriguing for that odd disconnect, of a frequently told story going through the mind of one of TV’s most original storytellers and
See full article at Indiewire »

Why Steven Soderbergh Deserves an Emmy for Directing ‘The Knick’

Why Steven Soderbergh Deserves an Emmy for Directing ‘The Knick’
Before “The Knick” scatters its characters to the four winds, Steven Soderbergh offers one last, literal reminder that he thinks outside the box. When coarse ambulance driver Tom Cleary (Chris Sullivan) seeks counsel from a priest, his feet protrude from the confessional, and though his voice remains as sharp as if he were beside us, Soderbergh replaces the traditional depiction of penance—faint light filtering through the partition, illuminating a face wracked by guilt—with a far more ambiguous one.

Via a series of long, still compositions, venturing into the barren aisles and empty pews, the camera edges toward the opposite end of the cavernous nave, returning to the image of the Irishman’s shoes only when he reaches his reason for being there. In his slightly forlorn brogue, Cleary asks for a prayer that the disgraced Sister Harriet (Cara Seymour) accept his hand in marriage: He wants her to be his wife,
See full article at Indiewire »

[Watch] ‘The Knick’ creators Michael Begler & Jack Amiel dish working with Clive Owen and Steven Soderbergh

“I think we set the bar really high in season one,” admits Michael Begler as we chat with him and Jack Amiel via webcam (watch above) about their Cinemax series “The Knick.” Set in New York in the early twentieth century, this medical drama stars Clive Owen as Dr. John Thackery, a brilliant surgeon who battles drug addiction while making […]
See full article at Gold Derby »

Atx Festival Cancels Violence-Themed Panel in Light of Orlando Shooting

Atx Festival Cancels Violence-Themed Panel in Light of Orlando Shooting
The Austin TV Festival canceled a panel discussion titled “Viewer Discretion Advised,” in light of the mass shootings in Orlando, the deadliest in American history.

The discussion would have featured showrunners discussing “to what extent the violence shown in their series is needed and appropriate to authentically tell their story.”

Panelists scheduled to appear included Kurt Sutter (“Sons of Anarchy”), Jack Amiel (“The Knick”), Brian Michael Bendis (“Powers”), Noah Hawley (“Fargo”) and Universal TV VP of drama Stacey Silverman.

Atx co-founders Emily Gipson and Caitlin McFarland made the decision early this morning. In a message posted on Twitter and Facebook, they said, “Out of respect for victims of the tragedy in Orlando last night, we won’t be holding the Viewer Discretion Advised panel today. While it is a very important conversation to have, today does not feel like the the time to have it. Viewer Discretion Advised panel is cancelled.”

Out of respect for the victims of the tragedy in Orlando last night, we won't be holding the Viewer Discretion Advised panel today.

— Atx TV Festival (@ATXFestival) June 12, 2016

While it is a very important conversation to have, today does not feel like the time to have it. Viewer Discretion Advised panel cancelled.

— Atx TV Festival (@ATXFestival) June 12, 2016

Powers” producer Bendis, who was scheduled to appear on the panel, also tweeted the news. “Out of respect and due to security issue, my last panel @Atx Festival is cancelled,” he wrote. “I’m going home to be with my family. I hope you do the same.”

out of respect and due to security issues my last panel @ATXFestival is cancelled. I'm going home to be with my family. hope you do the same

Brian Michael Bendis (@Brianmbendis) June 12, 2016
See full article at Variety - TV News »

GLAAD Presenting TV Tropes Panel at Atx Television Festival

GLAAD Presenting TV Tropes Panel at Atx Television Festival
The fifth annual Atx Television Festival has rounded out its fest programming with the addition of more panels, screenings and discussions, including a “Bury Your Tropes” panel, presented by GLAAD, which will cover the recent discussion surrounding stereotypical portrayals of Lgbtq characters on television.

“Bury Your Tropes” will take on the recent uproar over television storylines, specifically surrounding the many deaths of lesbian characters, plus the larger conversation about the importance of inclusion and positive representation on TV. Panelists are Bradley Bredeweg (“The Fosters”), Javier Grillo-Marxuach (“Lost,” “The 100”), Krista Vernoff (“Shameless,” “Grey’s Anatomy”), Carter Covington (“Faking It”) and GLAAD’s entertainment media strategist Megan Townsend.

Atx has also added events for Hulu’s “The Path,” the final season of USA’s “Royal Pains,” Freeform’s new series “Guilt,” a sit-down with Shondaland’s Betsy Beers, a master class with Howard Gordon and “Power(ful) TV,” a panel discussing
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Cinemax Considering The Knick Season 3

Warning: spoilers ahead for the second season finale of The Knick. The Knick‘s second season ended in quite a brutal and shocking way, as the series’ central character, Dr. Thackery (played Clive Owen), appeared to die on the table after botching a surgery he was performing on himself. Even Owen himself hasn’t refuted his character’s fate, telling Variety, when the outlet asked if Thackery was dead, that “It certainly looks that way.” However, Variety is also now reporting that, even with the apparent death of Thackery and the loss of Clive Owen as its lead (Owen has said that he always intended to only do two seasons of the show), a third season of The Knick remains a possibility. The outlet states that “a script for the season premiere has been ordered, in addition to a season outline” and that series creators Michael Begler and Jack Amiel
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Cinemax Orders a Premiere Script and Outline for The Knick’s Third Season

  • Vulture
Cinemax Orders a Premiere Script and Outline for The Knick’s Third Season
Warning: This post discusses the events of last night's episode of The Knick, so tread carefully. Variety reports that Cinemax has ordered a premiere script and season outline for the third season of its early-20th-century hospital drama The Knick, which may come as a surprise to some viewers as last night's episode ended with the death of series lead Doctor Thackery (Clive Owen). Variety's report, however, doesn't imply that Cinemax is going to mimic any of that Jon Snow business. Owen told Variety that he only planned to do two seasons of the show, so Thackery will probably stay dead. And while the series itself was initially built for a two-year arc, according to a statement from Cinemax, all-star director Steven Soderbergh and creators Michael Begler and Jack Amiel have been discussing ways to continue the story. In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Amiel went into more detail
See full article at Vulture »

Cinemax Orders "Knick" S3 Premiere Script

Cinemax has yet to reach a decision over the renewal of its period medical drama "The Knick," but the signs are good with word today that a script for a third season premiere has been ordered by the network.

Despite strong critical acclaim, the series has been a decidedly low rater for the network and buzz on it has cooled down since its much talked about first season last year. As a result there's been questions over its renewal chances throughout its second season run with the show's finale airing yesterday.

The premiere script order is also said to include a new season outline as well. Should it come back, series creators Michael Begler and Jack Amiel are both to return as writers and executive producers.

In a statement, Cinemax says: "Cinemax has been in conversations with Steven Soderbergh on how we might continue with 'The Knick'. When first conceived,
See full article at Dark Horizons »

‘The Knick’: Cinemax Orders Script for Season 3 Premiere (Exclusive)

‘The Knick’: Cinemax Orders Script for Season 3 Premiere (Exclusive)
Spoiler Alert: Do not read ahead if you have not watched the Season 2 finale of “The Knick,” which aired Friday, Dec. 18.

The Knick” ended its second season with a shocker: Clive Owen’s Dr. Thackery seemingly died on the table, after a botched attempt to perform surgery on himself. When asked if the character is dead, Owen told Variety, “It certainly looks that way.”

So, does Dr. Thackery’s apparent death mean the same for the series, too?

While a decision for a renewal is still undetermined, a third season of “The Knick” is under consideration and negotiations are underway. Insiders close to the show tell Variety that a script for the season premiere has been ordered, in addition to a season outline. Series creators Michael Begler and Jack Amiel are both set to return as exec producers and writers, should Cinemax order up season 3. Cinemax declined to comment.

“Cinemax
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Review & Recap: ’The Knick’ Season 2, Episode 10, ‘This Is All We Are’

If last week we saw the physical destruction of The Knick, with a fire consuming and obliterating the construction of the new hospital, the season finale, “This Is All We Are,” finds the emotional and personal lives of many of the characters following suit. Whatever glimmers of hope, or shafts of light illuminating suggested innocence there might have been across the season, it's revealed that beneath everybody lies pain and darkness. “The Knick” goes out with a bold finish, one that can only see a radical change, if we are to see a third season. It perhaps speaks to the worldview of Jack Amiel and Michael Begler that the show’s most ethically compromised, and bigoted character, is the one who gets the biggest reward. But that doesn’t mean bad behavior doesn’t go unpunished, nor hubris. From their pen, sympathy is just a recipe for future disappointment, good intentions hide sinister motives,
See full article at The Playlist »

The Knick, Ep. 2.08, “Not Well at All”

The Knick, Season 2, Episode 8 “Not Well at All”

Written by Jack Amiel and Michael Begler

Directed by Steven Soderbergh

Airs Fridays at 8pm (Et) on Cinemax

Wow. That seems to be the only appropriate response to such a well-crafted and invigorating hour of television as The Knick‘s latest, but it bears repeating: wow.

After last week’s less than stellar performance, an episode that culminated in the most ridiculous stunt this generally grounded period drama has ever had the audacity to pull, “Not Well at All” emerges as a fantastic return to form for The Knick, and even in this increasingly surprising season, perhaps the medical drama’s best episode yet.

“Not Well at All” opens with quite a bang, in a double whammy of dramatic impulse which includes one of Thackery’s (Clive Owen) desperate addiction patients hastily killing himself with an embalming fluid overdose, and the invasion
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Knick, Ep. 2.07, “Williams and Walker”

The Knick, Season 2, Episode 7, “Williams and Walker”

Written by Jack Amiel and Michael Begler

Directed by Steven Soderbergh

Airs Fridays at 8pm (Et) on Cinemax

After four straight weeks of steady quality, it’s not much of a surprise how The Knick flounders away its seventeenth hour, but that doesn’t make it any less disappointing. When compared to the showstopping turn which occupied this same spot during the last season, the magnificent and racially charged “Get the Rope”, “Williams and Walker” becomes even more of a sore spot. If this were merely a recap, it could be summed up in a matter of two paragraphs or less but as it is not, let us dig into the meddling meat of The Knick‘s latest.

The central problem is first and foremost that not a lot happens here, especially considering the 57 minute run time. The Knick has had far better
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Knick, Ep. 2.06 “There Are Rules”

The Knick, Season 2, Episode 6, “There Are Rules”

Written by Jack Amiel and Michael Begler

Directed by Steven Soderbergh

Airs Fridays at 8pm (Et) on Cinemax

After a veritable barrage of bad news over the last few weeks, The Knick seems to be on a more redemptive arc this week, and it’s a nice change of pace. This season has undoubtedly been stronger than the first, but it’s also been a lot rougher. “There Are Rules”gives us a small break from that kind of punishment, as it mixes in a bit more good to go with the bad.

The episode opens with Thackery (Clive Owen) trying to broaden his horizons at a sort of carnival-bazaar, where he bears witness to the thrills and thralls of hypnosis, as well as the rare medical occurrence of Siamese twins. While the hypnosis track leads to another great comedic touch when Cleary
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Knick, Ep. 2.05, “Whiplash”

The Knick, Season 2, Episode 5, “Whiplash”

Written by Jack Amiel and Michael Begler

Directed by Steven Soderbergh

Airs Fridays at 8pm (Et) on Cinemax

As I’ve been noting throughout The Knick‘s entire run, this is a show with a shocking propensity for gruesome imagery, and “Whiplash” is the most egregious and stomach-churning example to date.

Of particular note is a series of scenes that shows Thackery (Clive Owen) pulling back the protective layer which covers the brain and prodding it with a series of electrical currents in order to stimulate certain areas of the brain. It’s worth mentioning, of course, that the patient is alive and awake during the process. While the brain feels no pain, as Thackery reminds his fellow doctors, the scene is particularly disturbing when Thackery exploits the patient’s emotions to demonstrate the operation of the brain. While forceps dangle with scalp tissue firmly clasped,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Review & Recap: ’The Knick’ Season 2, Episode 4, ‘Wonderful Surprises’

Warning, spoilers ahead. As much as we admire the dexterity and nimbleness of filmmaker Steven Soderbergh,"The Knick" writers and showrunners Jack Amiel Michael Begler should be given credit for the bon mots and more of "Wonderful Surprises." The duo crosscut, begin and end mini story lines and character arcs with their own gracefulness while still informing and driving the bigger picture. While “The Knick” is a “serious” medical drama that’s occasionally gruesome for some, there’s a terrific gallows humor to it all and this week’s episode has a huge laugh-out-loud moment of hilarious horror. Of course, it’s at the expense of one of this season’s best new characters, who had a fleeting stay at The Knickerbocker hospital. The inept and lascivious Dr. Mays (Ben Livingston) meets his maker after his flirting is finally his undoing. Hitting on one of the younger new nurses, Mays is distracted,
See full article at The Playlist »

Review & Recap: ’The Knick’ Season 2, Episode 4, ‘Wonderful Surprises’

Review & Recap: ’The Knick’ Season 2, Episode 4, ‘Wonderful Surprises’
Warning, spoilers ahead. As much as we admire the dexterity and nimbleness of filmmaker Steven Soderbergh,"The Knick" writers and showrunners Jack Amiel Michael Begler should be given credit for the bon mots and more of "Wonderful Surprises." The duo crosscut, begin and end mini story lines and character arcs with their own gracefulness while still informing and driving the bigger picture. While “The Knick” is a “serious” medical drama that’s occasionally gruesome for some, there’s a terrific gallows humor to it all and this week’s episode has a huge laugh-out-loud moment of hilarious horror. Of course, it’s at the expense of one of this season’s best new characters, who had a fleeting stay at The Knickerbocker hospital. The inept and lascivious Dr. Mays (Ben Livingston) meets his maker after his flirting is finally his undoing. Hitting on one of the younger new nurses, Mays is distracted,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

The Knick, Ep. 2.04, “Wonderful Surprises”

The Knick, Season 2, Episode 4, “Wonderful Surprises”

Written by Jack Amiel and Michael Begler

Directed by Steven Soderbergh

Airs Fridays at 8pm (Et) on Cinemax

There couldn’t be a more apt title for the latest episode of The Knick, as “Wonderful Surprises” delivers a bevy of shocks and revelations at every turn this week.

First up is Dr. Mays (Ben Livingston), whose perversions became enough of a distraction as to cause his own demise in a hideous and fiery flash. The accident spells a surprising end for a character who had scarcely arrived. The same can be said for Lucy’s father, another new addition who has disappeared as quickly as he came. Are we to guess that writers Jack Amiel and Michael Beglar had second thoughts about these new characters while in the creative process? Their quick introductions and sudden exits certainly seem to suggest as much.

Dr. Thackery
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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