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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004

1-20 of 43 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Writers Guild of America announces TV nominations for WGA Awards, Fargo “snub” explained by FX

6 December 2014 1:25 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

With Awards season heating up, the Writers Guild of America has announced its TV nominations for the WGA Awards, which are set to take place in February. Check out the full list of nominees below…

Drama Series:

Game of Thrones, Written by David Benioff, Bryan Cogman, George R.R. Martin, D.B. Weiss (HBO)

The Good Wife, Written by Leonard Dick, Keith Eisner, Matthew Hodgson, Ted Humphrey, Michelle King, Robert King, Erica Shelton Kodish, Matthew Montoya, Luke Schelhaas, Nichelle Tramble Spellman, Craig Turk, Julia Wolfe (CBS)

House of Cards, Written by Bill Cain, Laura Eason, Sam R. Forman, William Kennedy, Kenneth Lin, John Mankiewicz, David Manson, Beau Willimon (Netflix)

Mad Men, Written by Heather Jeng Bladt, Semi Chellas, Jonathan Igla, David Iserson, Erin Levy, Matthew Weiner, Carly Wray (AMC)

True Detective, Written by Nic Pizzolatto (HBO)

Comedy Series:

Louie, Written by Louis Ck (FX)

Orange Is the New Black, Written by Stephen Falk, »

- Gary Collinson

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FX doesn't submit 'Fargo' as 'Transparent,' 'True Detective' lead WGA TV nominations

4 December 2014 5:49 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

The Writers Guild of America announced the TV nominees for the 2015 WGA Awards on Thursday (December 4) morning and several new shows broke into the fields in a big way. And, of course, there were a number of big WGA Award nomination head-scratchers. Specifically, where the heck was FX's "Fargo"? The answer is below. Making perhaps the biggest splash was "Transparent," which earned three nominations and, since "Orange Is The New Black" earned two nods and "House of Cards" pick up one, that meant that Amazon Prime and Netflix are, at least for one award-giving organization, on equal footing as creators of original programming. The Jill Soloway-created "Transparent" is nominated for New Series, where it will go against "The Affair," "The Knick," "Silicon Valley" and "True Detective." "Transparent" and "Silicon Valley" are also up for Comedy Series, going against "Louie," "Veep" and "Orange Is The New Black." Lest you panic »

- Daniel Fienberg

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‘Game of Thrones,’ ‘True Detective,’ ‘Transparent’ Lead WGA TV Nominations

4 December 2014 10:21 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

HBO’s “Silicon Valley” and Amazon’s “Transparent” were among the newbie standouts in this year’s TV nominees for the Writers Guild Awards.

Both shows earned noms for comedy series as well as for new series. “Transparent” made it a trifecta with a nom for episodic comedy, for “The Wilderness” seg penned by Ethan Kuperberg.

HBO’s “Game of Thrones,” “Boardwalk Empire” and “True Detective,” CBS’s “The Good Wife,” AMC’s “Mad Men,” FX’s “Louie” and ABC’s “Modern Family” also grabbed two noms each.

Modern Family” was not selected in the comedy series category but took two nods for the “The Cold” and “Three Dinners” segments. Similarly, “Boardwalk Empire” was not named for drama series but received nomimations for the “Devil You Know” and “Friendless Child” episodes.

The Simpsons” had its usual strong showing with four bids for animation writing with “Bob’s Burgers” taking two. »

- Dave McNary

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'The Knick' creators Jack Amiel and Michael Begler on bloody world of early medicine [Exclusive Video]

25 November 2014 10:45 AM, PST | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

"The blood is really pumping out of those bodies," declared Michael Begler, executive producer of the new Cinemax drama "The Knick," during our recent webcam chat (watch below). "When they make that first cut into the body, it's just a gorefest. We were all taken aback at first by how much blood there was. That's what made it so great because it seemed so real and so visceral." He and co-creator Jack Amiel delighted in dishing the first season of the show, which is set in a fictional New York hospital in 1900. -Break- Do you think "The Knick" will earn a Golden Globe nomination for Best TV Drama Series? Click here to enter your own predictions for this category and all of the Golden Globe top races, or use our easy drag-and-drop menu at the bottom of this post to get started. Your predictions determine our racetrack odds and you »

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The Knick, Ep. 1.10 “Crutchfield”: The Circus Burns Down in Season Finale

18 October 2014 10:26 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Knick, Season 1, Episode 10: “Crutchfield”

Written by Jack Amiel & Michael Begler

Directed by Steven Soderbergh

Airs Fridays at 8Pm Est on Cinemax

The Knick is the rare case of a show that arrived precisely at the perfect time for it. Some shows arrive too far ahead of their time, and are thus canceled prematurely. Some shows arrive on the back of a trend, far too late to really make an impact. But The Knick? It arrived precisely when it should have. The trend of filmmakers making their mark on TV is still in an exciting growth stage, and the medical drama has been in need of someone like Soderbergh to come in and tear up the sutures.

This season finale is uniquely constructed, in that the first half of the episode is quite calm. We’ve become accustomed to finales serving as forest fires, rather than slow burns like this episode is. »

- Dylan Griffin

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The Knick Season 1 Finale Recap: Time to Start Getting Better

17 October 2014 8:00 PM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

Endings are difficult. For its final first-season episode, “Crutchfield” (written by Jack Amiel and Michael Begler; directed, edited and photographed by Steven Soderbergh), Cinemax’s period hospital drama The Knick attempts to tie off a number of lingering narrative threads, and this it does — though in ways that feel, in toto, extremely conventional. This has been a problem that I’ve remarked on through the run of the series: The scripts rarely live up to Soderbergh’s extraordinary craft. His constant inventiveness (finding new ways of seeing in almost every scene) only underscores the many flaws of the storytelling.Consider that the emotional high point of “Crutchfield” comes early when Cornelia Robertson — having paid for a dead-of-night procedure to terminate her and Dr. Algernon Edwards’s unborn child — stumbles into Tom Cleary and Sister Harriet’s underground abortion operation. Cleary is tickled by this turn of events, but it’s »

- Keith Uhlich

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Interview: ‘The Knick’ Writer/Creators Talk Steven Soderbergh, Clive Owen, The "Crazy Shit" Of The 1900s & More

17 October 2014 1:00 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Grimy, stylish, and hellish, Steven Soderbergh’s turn-of-the-century medical drama “The Knick” is often like a nightmarish horror. If period dramas routinely romanticize the era with tea, doilies, and niceties, “The Knick” is a terrifying reminder that life back in the 1900s—when medicine and science were still relatively in their infancy—was grueling and cheap. And if you got sick, you were as good as dead. Set in New York City in 1900 in a fictionalized version of the Knickerbocker Hospital, mortality rates are high, and antibiotics are all but nonexistent. At the center of it all is Dr. John Thackery (Clive Owen), a surgeon and medical pioneer, who’s also a brusque, narcissistic genius and full-on cocaine addict. Written and created Jack Amiel and Michael Begler (mostly known for romantic comedies and sitcoms), Steven “not the retiring type” Soderbergh was supposed to take a long sabbatical after his last feature, »

- Rodrigo Perez

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André Holland Talks The Knick, Research for the Role, Racism of the Era, Selma, and More

17 October 2014 8:02 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Created by Jack Amiel and Michael Begler and directed by Steven Soderbergh, the Cinemax drama series The Knick showcases The Knickerbocker Hospital in New York City in 1900, when it was the home to groundbreaking surgeons, nurses and stuff who pushed the boundaries of medicine in a time of high mortality rates and no antibiotics.  Equal parts brilliant and arrogant, Dr. John Thackery (Clive Owen) is the newly appointed leader of the surgery staff, but his own ambition for medical discovery is almost overshadowed by his addiction to cocaine and opium.  While addressing issues of race, sex and class, the show will undoubtedly make viewers grateful for how far we’ve come. During this exclusive interview with Collider, actor André Holland (who plays gifted, Harvard-trained surgeon Dr. Algernon Edwards) talked about how he got involved with The Knick, what attracted him to this role, the extent of his research, the level »

- Christina Radish

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Chris Sullivan Talks The Knick, How He Views Tom Cleary, the Uniform, His Folk Band, and More

10 October 2014 3:04 PM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Created by Jack Amiel and Michael Begler and directed by Steven Soderbergh, the Cinemax drama series The Knick showcases The Knickerbocker Hospital in New York City in 1900, when it was the home to groundbreaking surgeons, nurses and stuff who pushed the boundaries of medicine in a time of high mortality rates and no antibiotics.  Equal parts brilliant and arrogant, Dr. John Thackery (Clive Owen) is the newly appointed leader of the surgery staff, but his own ambition for medical discovery is almost overshadowed by his addiction to cocaine and opium.  While addressing issues of race, sex and class, the show will undoubtedly make viewers grateful for how far we’ve come. During this exclusive phone interview with Collider, actor Chris Sullivan (who plays Tom Cleary, the Irish ambulance driver who can make almost any situation work to his benefit) talked about how he came to be a part of The Knick, »

- Christina Radish

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8 Very Soderberghian Things About The Knick

10 October 2014 2:45 PM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

At a time when cults form around top-to-bottom filmmakers like Quentin Tarantino and Christopher Nolan, Steven Soderbergh is in some ways a throwback to the golden age of the Hollywood auteur. He adapts his style to a range of genres and subjects, sometimes in scripts he’s helped develop, and other times in material, like The Knick, written by Jack Amiel and Michael Begler, to which he’s arrived after the fact.Viewers of the Cinemax series who have kept up with Soderbergh’s breathless output — 14 features in the last decade, plus a supposedly impending retirement that increasingly seems like a put-on — will instantly recognize the director’s signature: The sharp, hyperreal visual style, courtesy of Red cameras, that has been his trademark since 2008’s Che. A driving, percussive Cliff Martinez score. A penchant for crisp, scene-setting title cards. Innovative cross-cutting among parallel story lines, a Soderbergh motif since Traffic »

- Ben Kenigsberg

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The Knick, Ep. 1.08 “Working Late a Lot”: The Devil is in All of Us In Show’s Bleakest Episode Yet

4 October 2014 3:00 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Knick, Season 1, Episode 8: “Working Late a Lot”

Written by Jack Amiel & Michael Begler

Directed by Steven Soderbergh

Airs Fridays at 8Pm Est on Cinemax

This day was always going to come on this show. The moment we saw Thackery use cocaine in episode one it was clear that one day he’d be faced with the challenge of no cocaine at all. Soderbergh is right there with Thackery in the direction of each scene of his, often opting for long takes focused on Thackery’s sweaty façade. Whether it’s in a board meeting or an examination of a patient, Soderbergh opts for a one take that’s marvelous in its simplicity, focusing on Thackery while others around him chatter.

And what a sight it is to witness, Clive Owen adopting the flustering posture of a powder keg in this episode. In each scene you see him striving »

- Dylan Griffin

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Steven Soderbergh Is Doing Some Next-Level Work on The Knick

29 September 2014 11:55 AM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

Let’s take a moment to appreciate what we’re watching when we watch The Knick: the greatest sustained display of directorial virtuosity in the history of American TV, courtesy of the show’s primary and thus far only director, Steven Soderbergh. The seventh episode of this Cinemax drama, which aired on Friday, is one of the most exciting, horrifying, beautiful, and clever hours of filmmaking I’ve seen this year—and that’s saying a lot, considering how great the year has been. The show is created and written by Jack Amiel and Michael Begler, and set in and around the titular hospital circa 1900. This episode, “Get a Rope,” shows what happens when an incident of racial violence touches off a wave of vigilantism, pitting African-Americans against Irish-Americans and plunging the neighborhood into chaos.  “Get a Rope” contains many harrowing setpieces, starting with the inciting incident (an off-duty »

- Matt Zoller Seitz

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The Knick, Ep. 1.07 “Get the Rope” dashes by at a brisk, brutal 42 minutes

27 September 2014 11:46 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Knick, Season 1, Episode 7: “Get The Rope”

Written by Jack Amiel & Michael Begler

Directed by Steven Soderbergh

Airs Fridays at 8Pm Est on Cinemax

The Knick has set itself as the show to beat this week, with it’s most tense and taut episode to date. “Get the Rope” sets its sights primarily on race relations, an issue that has been sweltering underneath the shows sticky surface for a long time now, but this week, it boils into the spotlight with a cruel and ugly candor.

The episode begins with an altercation between a black man and a white man after the latter has propositioned the former’s wife as though she were a common street walker. The spat quickly turns deadly when the white man pulls out a club, and the black man counters with a knife which he handily uses to make short work of his opponent. »

- Mike Worby

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The Knick, Ep. 1.05: “They Capture the Heat” builds confidence for a strong first year

13 September 2014 5:14 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Knick, Season 1, Episode 5: “They Capture the Heat”

Written by Jack Amiel, Michael Begler & Steven Katz

Directed by Steven Soderbergh

Airs Fridays at 8Pm Est on Cinemax

Sometimes it’s the simplest things which bring us the greatest of joys. This is the recurring theme that echoes through The Knick as we reach the halfway point for its first season. From a first bike ride to a cold beer with a co-worker, it is the most basic of life’s pleasures that get our characters through another tough week at the Knickerbocker Hospital.

Thackery’s first scene, wherein he awakens just long enough to tell someone he doesn’t know to “go to hell”, serves as a stark counterpoint to the whimsical and optimistic moments that follow. We next see him smiling wistfully as Nurse Elkins cruises by on her shiny blue bike. Though the rest of the episode »

- Mike Worby

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The Knick Ep.1.04, “Where’s the Dignity”: No dignity here in the show’s strongest episode yet

6 September 2014 8:28 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Knick, Season 1, Episode 4: “Where’s the Dignity”

Written by Jack Amiel & Michael Begler

Directed by Steven Soderbergh

Airs Fridays at 8Pm Est on Cinemax

The episode asks the title question in just about every scene. Consider the opening jaw-dropping opening scene featuring Cleary dumping a bag of rats in a ring to be stomped on, all diegetic sound muted with only Cliff Martinez’s bonkers and wondrous score playing over it, making it all the more haunting. Where’s the dignity?

The last episode I reviewed, “Mr. Paris Shoes”, was absent of any of the dark humor of the pilot, so it’s been great to see the show implement moments of pitch black comedy over the past few weeks, and especially in this episode. Consider when Thackery threatens to stab Edwards with his father’s Union sword if the patient dies. Edwards replies, “Union? I would have thought Confederate. »

- Dylan Griffin

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The Knick Recap: Next Time, Kick the Man Instead

6 September 2014 2:07 PM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

The only time I saw Michael Cimino’s film maudit Heaven’s Gate (1980) — as a teen, with an adventurous friend, off of laser disc — I found it a bloated bore that I hoped to never again experience. (Now that time has passed and bias has mellowed, I feel like it’s due a rewatch given the many impassioned defenders, several of them friends and colleagues, who helped pave the way to the film’s recent Criterion Collection canonization. Someday…someday.) One of the few things that stuck with me from that single viewing, probably because it jolted me out of the tedium, was a violent cockfighting sequence, which lore has it was staged for real, and resulted in several decapitated fowl and the firing of bit player Willem Dafoe.I thought back to that scene during the opening of this week’s episode of The Knick — “Where’s the Dignity, »

- Keith Uhlich

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Eve Hewson Talks The Knick, the Gory Surgery Scenes, Steven Soderbergh, and Her Love of E.T.

6 September 2014 4:59 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Created by Jack Amiel and Michael Begler and directed by Steven Soderbergh, the Cinemax drama series The Knick showcases The Knickerbocker Hospital in New York City in 1900, when it was the home to groundbreaking surgeons, nurses and stuff who pushed the boundaries of medicine in a time of high mortality rates and no antibiotics.  Equal parts brilliant and arrogant, Dr. John Thackery (Clive Owen) is the newly appointed leader of the surgery staff, but his own ambition for medical discovery is almost overshadowed by his addiction to cocaine and opium.  While addressing issues of race, sex and class, the show will undoubtedly make viewers grateful for how far we’ve come. During this exclusive interview with Collider, actress Eve Hewson (who plays fresh-faced nurse Lucy Elkins) talked about what led her down a path to acting, how she came to be a part of The Knick, why she decided to »

- Christina Radish

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‘The Knick’ Ep. 1.03: “The Busy Flea” ups the stakes dramatically

23 August 2014 7:34 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Knick, Season 1, Episode 3: “The Busy Flea”

Written by Jack Amiel & Michael Begler

Directed by Steven Soderbergh

Airs Fridays on Cinemax at 8Pm Est on Cinemax

While the new Cinemax series, The Knick, has had a promising run thus far, one would be hard pressed to deny the fact that it has been a bit uneventful. All of that has changed with the highly charged third episode however.

Beginning with Thackery receiving a visit from an old flame, “The Busy Flea” quickly sets the stage for a different kind of story. For one thing, Thackery’s former lover is not dropping by the Knick to catch up, but for a favor; the kind that only a surgeon can provide. The viewer knows right from the outset that there’s something amiss about this woman from the reaction of the admitting nurse. Soderbergh plays with the audience for a moment »

- Mike Worby

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TV Review: The Knick: Season 1, Episode 2: Mr. Paris Shoes [Cinemax]

22 August 2014 4:04 PM, PDT | Film-Book | See recent Film-Book news »

  Cinemax‘s The Knick Mr. Paris Shoes TV Show Review. The Knick: Season 1, Episode 2: Mr. Paris Shoes is officially off (to the races) — Jack Amiel and Michael Begler’s script unfolded effortlessly with installment 2 of Cinemax’s new series The Knick. The pacing perfect, strategic…completely compelling. Cinematographer Peter Andrews (Steven Soderbergh) [...]

Continue reading: TV Review: The Knick: Season 1, Episode 2: Mr. Paris Shoes [Cinemax] »

- Eden Tirl

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The Noteworthy: "88:88", The Films of Joaquim Pinto, Photogénie #2

20 August 2014 11:39 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Edited by Adam Cook

Above: a sneak peak of Paul Thomas Anderson's Inherent Vice, via our Tumblr. A wealth of content from the Melbourne International Film Festival's newly launched Critics Campus has been published here and here. For Rolling Stone, filmmaker James Gray writes on Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now on the occasion of its 35th anniversary: 

"The film is indeed self-consciously mythic, and with its transcendent imagery, it enters the cosmic realm. Captain Willard is an enigmatic hero, and we need the narration (written by Dispatches author Michael Herr) to help us know him. Surely the man has his dark side: he kills a wounded Vietnamese woman and hacks Colonel Kurtz to death. But by the end, Willard retains enough of his soul to protect the innocent, childlike Lance (Sam Bottoms), and here we see that the human connection endures. The film's experience expands in this moment, »

- Notebook

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004

1-20 of 43 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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