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The Loft Film Festival 2017

  • Sydney's Buzz
The Loft Film Festival 2017
Better than ever, now in its seventh year, the spectacular program with its filmmaking guests and a committed community of dedicated and intellectually alive filmgoers invigorates the mind and activist tendencies already in play.

Take for instance, University of Arizona Professor Noam Chomsky, one of the most influential public intellectuals in the world, speaking with Regents’ Professor Toni Massaro about social justice and the environment. Here he is, in person, being honored as every word he speaks is treated as a jewel. Considered the founder of modern linguistics, Chomsky has written more than 100 books, his most recent being Requiem for the American Dream: The 10 Principles of Concentration of Wealth & Power. An ardent free speech advocate, Chomsky has published and lectured widely on U.S. foreign policy, Mideast politics, terrorism, democratic society and war. Chomsky, who joined the UA faculty this fall, is a laureate professor in the Department of
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‘Stranger Things 2’: Casting the Kids of Hawkins As Grown-Ups

  • Indiewire Television
Last week, “The Crown” revealed that its third season of the royal drama would be jumping forward a few decades in time, and as a result recasting its leads, with the role of Queen Elizabeth II now passing from Claire Foy to Olivia Colman. This inspired the thought — what if “Stranger Things” (a period drama in its own way) pulled a similar move at some point during its run, jumping forward to something close to the modern day? And if it did, who should be enlisted to play the kids of Hawkins, all grown up?

Because perhaps they’ve remained friends over the years. Perhaps they’ve drifted apart. But it’s not hard to imagine strange things continuing to happen to these characters, no matter the time period. So here are our ideal picks for the cast of “Stranger Things 2017,” the kids as well as a few of the adults.
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Stranger Things 2’: Casting the Kids of Hawkins As Grown-Ups

  • Indiewire
Last week, “The Crown” revealed that its third season of the royal drama would be jumping forward a few decades in time, and as a result recasting its leads, with the role of Queen Elizabeth II now passing from Claire Foy to Olivia Colman. This inspired the thought — what if “Stranger Things” (a period drama in its own way) pulled a similar move at some point during its run, jumping forward to something close to the modern day? And if it did, who should be enlisted to play the kids of Hawkins, all grown up?

Because perhaps they’ve remained friends over the years. Perhaps they’ve drifted apart. But it’s not hard to imagine strange things continuing to happen to these characters, no matter the time period. So here are our ideal picks for the cast of “Stranger Things 2017,” the kids as well as a few of the adults.
See full article at Indiewire »

New Us Trailer for Kiyoshi Kurosawa's 'Daguerrotype' Ghost Story Film

"You bend reality to suit yourself." An official Us trailer has arrived for one of Japanese filmmaker Kiyoshi Kurosawa's films from last year, titled Daguerrotype (properly spelled - Daguerreotype). The film first premiered at the 2016 Toronto Film Festival, and has been awaiting a Us release ever since. It goes under a few different titles - The Woman in the Silver Plate, or in France it's Le secret de la chambre noire, which translates roughly to The Secret of the Dark Room. French actor Tahir Rahim stars as a young apprentice in Paris, back in the days of daguerreotypes. He falls for the photographer's daughter, but they learn there's some kind of malevolent forces stopping them from escaping. The full cast includes Olivier Gourmet, Constance Rousseau, Mathieu Amalric, Malik Zidi, Valérie Sibilia. This seems like a strange film. Here's the official Us trailer (+ poster) for Kiyoshi Kurosawa's Daguerrotype, direct
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

French Film Festival announces line-up by Amber Wilkinson - 2017-10-20 18:18:56

Indochine, which screened at the first French Film Festival in 1992. Régis Wargnier will attend The French Film Festival UK celebrates its silver jubilee this year and has announced the titles which will screen at the event, which runs at cinemas across the UK from November 2 to December 17.

Among the guests attending this year's festival will be Oscar-winning director Régis Wargnier, who will present a screening of Indochine, which screened at the first French Film Festival in 1992.

Other attendees include director Lucas Belvaux, who brings his topical film This Is Our Land and physical comedians Abel and Fiona Gordon, who will introduce their latest comedy Lost In Paris.

A number of films that screened in Cannes join the slate, including Redoubtable, about a young Jean-Luc Godard, Mathieu Amalric's singer biopic Barbara and Arnaud Desplechin's Ismael's Ghosts, which charts the complications that arise for a filmmaker when his former lover returns to the scene.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

The dreamers of dreams by Anne-Katrin Titze

The lineup for Ismael’s Ghosts: Director’s Cut - Mathieu Amalric with Anne-Katrin Titze and director Arnaud Desplechin Photo: Lilia Blouin

Arnaud Desplechin's Ismael's Ghosts: Director's Cut (Les Fantômes D'Ismaël), screenplay by the director with Léa Mysius and Julie Peyr, cinematography by Irina Lubtchansky (My Golden Days, La forêt), stars Mathieu Amalric, Marion Cotillard and Charlotte Gainsbourg with Louis Garrel, László Szabó, Alba Rohrwacher, and Hippolyte Girardot.

On the afternoon before the New York Film Festival premiere, Arnaud Desplechin and Mathieu Amalric discussed with me what to do with a phantom, Woody Allen's Bananas and the theme from Marnie, a touch of Claude Lanzmann (Fours Sister - Special Event), de-whispering with Rilke, suffering with Philip Roth, Jackson Pollock and the "real pleasure to do too much", Jacques Lacan's Seminar VIII in Tel Aviv, loving someone like an apple, what makes a good dreamer, second chances, and never abandoning Vertigo.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Hip Hop Redefined: How Arnaud Desplechin Uses Rap Music to Tell Fragile Stories — Nyff

  • Indiewire
Hip Hop Redefined: How Arnaud Desplechin Uses Rap Music to Tell Fragile Stories — Nyff
The following essay was produced as part of the 2017 Nyff Critics Academy, a workshop for aspiring film critics that took place during the 55th edition of the New York Film Festival.

Arnaud Desplechin may be the only filmmaker with a literary sensibility who understands the storytelling power of rap. His dialogue resembles a specific brand of French intellectualism that manifests in maladroit humor, and he maintains a general focus on epic, convoluted structures and literary motifs — soliloquies that break the fourth wall, omniscient narration, and strongly developed characters (which tie directly with his consistent lengthiness). His characters, while gauche, are irrevocably more privileged — they are artists and filmmakers, occupying large houses and indulgent with their resources.

This is why rap becomes a key contrasting factor in several of his films: Hip hop is not for the bourgeoise. The social issues that the lyrics of the rap songs often tackle have
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Before We Vanish’ Review: Kiyoshi Kurosawa Inches Towards Relevance With Sedate Alien Invasion Story — Nyff

  • Indiewire
‘Before We Vanish’ Review: Kiyoshi Kurosawa Inches Towards Relevance With Sedate Alien Invasion Story — Nyff
Watching the dreadful and painfully distended films Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa made over the last 10 years, you’d be forgiven for thinking that he was abducted in 2008 and hijacked by a clueless alien parasite trying to keep up appearances. A major figure during the early days of J-horror, Kurosawa distilled the entropy creeping into the digital age before most other artists even felt it — modern classics like “Cure,” “Pulse,” and even the less-horrifying likes of “Bright Future” continue to serve as invaluable time capsules from the era that we’re still trying to escape.

As recently as “Tokyo Sonata,” which is now almost a decade old, it seemed as though Kurosawa could sublimate his obsessions with societal decay into any genre, and the shattering final scene of that film left fans desperate to see where he would go next.

Then, things got bad. The falloff was subtle at first, and it came in small doses,
See full article at Indiewire »

New York Film Festival encore highlights by Anne-Katrin Titze

The Meyerowitz Stories (New And Selected) director Noah Baumbach: "It's always a pain in the ass shooting food, too." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Mrs. Hyde (Madame Hyde), screenplay by Serge Bozon and Axelle Ropert, cinematography by the director's sister Céline Bozon, starring Isabelle Huppert with Romain Duris and José Garcia; Joachim Trier's Thelma with Eili Harboe in the title role; Noah Baumbach's The Meyerowitz Stories (New And Selected) with a terrific ensemble cast including Dustin Hoffman, Adam Sandler, Emma Thompson, Elizabeth Marvel, Ben Stiller, and Grace Van Patten, and Ismael’s Ghosts (Les Fantômes D'Ismaël), the director's cut at 132 minutes, starring Mathieu Amalric (whose films on John Zorn and Barbara Hannigan will be shown in Spotlight on Documentary), Marion Cotillard and Charlotte Gainsbourg with Louis Garrel, László Szabó, Alba Rohrwacher, and Hippolyte Girardot, directed by Arnaud Desplechin are four more highlights screening in the...
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

New York Film Festival to screen Ismael's Ghosts by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2017-08-25 21:20:45

Ismael's Ghosts director Arnaud Desplechin Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Arnaud Desplechin's Ismael's Ghosts (Les Fantômes D'Ismaël), starring Mathieu Amalric (whose film C’est Presque Au Bout Du Monde will be shown in Spotlight on Documentary), Marion Cotillard and Charlotte Gainsbourg with Louis Garrel, László Szabó, Alba Rohrwacher, and Hippolyte Girardot will have the director's cut at 132 minutes screened in the Main Slate of the 55th New York Film Festival, presented by the Film Society of Lincoln Center. The Cannes Film Festival opening night premiere screening on May 17, 2017 was the 114-minute version and it received a theatrical release in France in both runtimes on the same day.

Magnolia Pictures has 2018 plans for the director's cut of Ismael's Ghosts hitting cinemas in the Us.

"Arnaud Desplechin is one of the cinema's great artists, one of the few from whom we can expect to...
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Marion Cotillard Drama ‘Ismael’s Ghosts’ Will Open in U.S. in New Version — Exclusive

  • Indiewire
When “Ismael’s Ghosts” opened the 70th Cannes Film Festival in May, the movie was a freewheeling portrait of a neurotic filmmaker, Ismael (Mathieu Amalric), grappling with the reappearance of his long-missing wife (Marion Cotillard) and his new relationship with a more stable woman (Charlotte Gainsbourg). That may or may not have changed, but when “Ismael’s Ghosts” arrives at the New York Film Festival in September, it’s going to look a lot different.

While “Ismael’s Ghosts” clocked in at roughly two hours for its Cannes premiere, Magnolia Pictures will unveil Arnaud Desplechin’s director’s cut at Nyff in advance of its U.S. release. The new version is a full 20 minutes longer. Magnolia Pictures will only release that version into theaters for the film’s release in early 2018.

The news comes months after a tangled back-and-forth between Desplechin and the French distributors of the movie, which
See full article at Indiewire »

New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup

New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup
The 55th New York Film Festival will debut a starry roster of documentaries featuring giants of the art and literary worlds as well as Alex Gibney’s postponed “No Stone Unturned,” a critical investigation into the 1994 Loughinisland massacre in Ireland, which was pulled from Tribeca in April.

Other new works include films from directors Abel Ferrara, Sara Driver, Nancy Buirski, Mathieu Amalric, and Barbet Schroeder; Vanessa Redgrave’s directorial debut “Sea Sorrow,” which played at Cannes; and films featuring Joan Didion, Arthur Miller, Gay Talese, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Jane Goodall, plus stories about racism, American immigration, and the global refugee crisis.

Three documentaries spotlight acclaimed writers, including the world premiere of Griffin Dunne’s “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold,” returning Nyff filmmaker Rebecca Miller’s tender portrait of her father, “Arthur Miller: Writer,” and the World Premiere of Myles Kane and Josh Koury’s “Voyeur,” tracking journalist Gay Talese
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup

  • Indiewire
New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup
The 55th New York Film Festival will debut a starry roster of documentaries featuring giants of the art and literary worlds as well as Alex Gibney’s postponed “No Stone Unturned,” a critical investigation into the 1994 Loughinisland massacre in Ireland, which was pulled from Tribeca in April.

Other new works include films from directors Abel Ferrara, Sara Driver, Nancy Buirski, Mathieu Amalric, and Barbet Schroeder; Vanessa Redgrave’s directorial debut “Sea Sorrow,” which played at Cannes; and films featuring Joan Didion, Arthur Miller, Gay Talese, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Jane Goodall, plus stories about racism, American immigration, and the global refugee crisis.

Three documentaries spotlight acclaimed writers, including the world premiere of Griffin Dunne’s “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold,” returning Nyff filmmaker Rebecca Miller’s tender portrait of her father, “Arthur Miller: Writer,” and the World Premiere of Myles Kane and Josh Koury’s “Voyeur,” tracking journalist
See full article at Indiewire »

Nyff Spotlight on Documentary selections announced by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2017-08-23 18:34:41

The Voyeur's Motel author Gay Talese is observed in Myles Kane and Josh Koury's Voyeur, which will screen at the New York Film Festival Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The Film Society of Lincoln Center has announced the 55th New York Film Festival Spotlight on Documentary selections this afternoon. The program includes Three Music Films (C’est Presque Au Bout Du Monde, Zorn (2010-2017) and Music Is Music) by Mathieu Amalric, Barbet Schroeder's The Venerable W, Denis Côté's A Skin So Soft, Vanessa Redgrave's Sea Sorrow, Abel Ferrara's Piazza Vittorio, Alex Gibney's No Stone Unturned, Griffin Dunne's Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold, Brett Morgen's Jane, Rebecca Miller's Arthur Miller: Writer, Sara Driver's Boom For Real The Late Teenage Years Of Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Myles Kane and Josh Koury's Voyeur.

Amnesia director Barbet Schroeder to show The Venerable W Photo:
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Vanessa Redgrave, Alex Gibney, Griffin Dunne Documentaries Join New York Film Festival Slate (Exclusive)

Vanessa Redgrave, Alex Gibney, Griffin Dunne Documentaries Join New York Film Festival Slate (Exclusive)
The 2017 New York Film Festival’s Spotlight on Documentary lineup includes work by a number of notable directors, with world premieres by Vanessa Redgrave (“Sea Sorrow”), Alex Gibney (“No Stone Unturned”), and Griffin Dunne (“Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold”), among others.

The documentaries on tap encompass a wide range of subjects, including the global refugee crisis (“Sea Sorrow”), male bodybuilding (Denis Côté’s “A Skin So Soft”), small-town racism and misogyny (Travis Wilkerson’s “Did You Wonder Who Fired the Gun?”), Rome’s biggest public square (Abel Ferrara’s “Piazza Vittorio”), and a 1994 Irish massacre (“No Stone Unturned”).

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New York Film Festival 2017 Slate Dominated by Amazon, Netflix (Full List)

There are also a number of works focused on individuals, including Rebecca Miller’s movie about her playwright father, “Arthur Miller: Writer,” as well as docs about the writer Joan Didion (“The Center Will Not Hold”), artist Jean-Michel Basquiat (Sara Driver’s “Boom for
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Nyff Announces 2017 Main Slate, Including ‘Call Me By Your Name,’ ‘The Florida Project,’ ‘Lady Bird,’ and More

  • Indiewire
Nyff Announces 2017 Main Slate, Including ‘Call Me By Your Name,’ ‘The Florida Project,’ ‘Lady Bird,’ and More
It’s beginning to look a lot like fall festival season. On the heels of announcements from Tiff and Venice, the 55th edition of the New York Film Festival has unveiled its Main Slate, including a number of returning faces, emerging talents, and some of the most anticipated films from the festival circuit this year.

This year’s Main Slate showcases a number of films honored at Cannes including Ruben Östlund’s Palme d’Or–winner “The Square,” Robin Campillo’s “Bpm,” and Agnès Varda & Jr’s “Faces Places.” Other Cannes standouts, including “The Rider” and “The Florida Project,” will also screen at Nyff.

Read MoreTIFF Reveals First Slate of 2017 Titles, Including ‘The Shape of Water,’ ‘Downsizing,’ and ‘Call Me By Your Name

Elsewhere, Aki Kaurismäki’s Silver Bear–winner “The Other Side of Hope” and Agnieszka Holland’s Alfred Bauer Prize–winner “Spoor” come to Nyff after Berlin bows.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Creepy’ Review: ‘Pulse’ Director Kiyoshi Kurosawa Returns to Form with a Chiller That Lives Up to Its Title

  • Indiewire
‘Creepy’ Review: ‘Pulse’ Director Kiyoshi Kurosawa Returns to Form with a Chiller That Lives Up to Its Title
According to a lecture given early in “Creepy,” serial killers are broken down into three categories: organized, disorganized, and mixed characteristic. The first two are relatively easy to define, and thus simpler to track down. Mixed-characteristic killers, meanwhile, exhibit no discernible patterns. They’re puzzles, anomalies. You can probably guess which class of killer this detective story from Kiyoshi Kurosawa follows.

The director, whose genre mastery is most evident in the likes of “Pulse” and “Cure,” more recently delved into this territory in “Daguerreotype.” That old-fashioned haunt took him outside Japan with the help of Tahar Rahim, Olivier Gourmet, and Mathieu Amalric; “Creepy” is both a return home and a return to form. Here he’s woven a procedural yarn from a novel by Yutaka Maekawa that was either loosely adapted or strikingly aligned with the director’s long-established sensibilities.

Read MoreNew Films By Terence Davies & Kiyoshi Kurosawa Set Berlin Premieres,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Tomorrow and Thereafter’ Review: A Family Drama That’s Almost Powerful But Even More Disappointing — Locarno 2017

  • Indiewire
‘Tomorrow and Thereafter’ Review: A Family Drama That’s Almost Powerful But Even More Disappointing — Locarno 2017
With its cluttered bedrooms and eye-popping primary-colored scarfs and skirts, Noémie Lvovsky’s “Tomorrow and Thereafter” is a film of tactile pleasures. Its inhabitants move through a world dense with thousands of miniscule details, and just as surely as they stuff their sitting rooms with gimcracks and mismatched furniture do they also ultimately submit them to destruction. Wedding dress hems trawled along wet pavements, school uniforms caked in mud, curtains ablaze in the middle of a living room: these crowded domestic worlds collide with the very real consequences of their owners’ eccentricities and psychological troubles.

But as smart as the filmmakers are in their good taste in costume and as shrewdly as they dress their sets with an eye for detail that would make James Gray blush, so too do they ultimately withdraw from the intensity of emotion that is suggested by the subject matter. For a film about a
See full article at Indiewire »

Locarno Film Review: ‘Tomorrow and Thereafter’

Locarno Film Review: ‘Tomorrow and Thereafter’
Stories for kids are allowed a certain leeway when it comes to background and believability: No one really gets hung up on not knowing why Little Red Riding Hood’s granny lives in the middle of the woods, or even why Red doesn’t have a real name. In film, it’s pretty much the same, yet when it’s a movie meant for adults about a child, and the adult audience is supposed to be guided into reconnecting with the fears and loneliness of their nine-year-old selves, then more of the “whys” are needed.

With “Tomorrow and Thereafter,” actress-director Noémi Lvovsky expects viewers to be so taken with her young protagonist and her unbalanced mother that they’ll treat the whole thing as a precious fairy tale of peril and liberation, yet there’s something so deeply personal here (or perhaps so deeply French) that it’s difficult to imagine just who it’s made for
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Luc Besson Movies Ranked from Worst to Best

  • Indiewire
Luc Besson Movies Ranked from Worst to Best
Too Hollywood for art houses and too art house for Hollywood, iconoclastic French filmmaker Luc Besson has always had to blaze his own trail. Unwilling — or unable — to compromise from the very start (his debut feature was a dialogue-free post-apocalyptic drama about a waterless future where it occasionally rains fish), Besson continues to offset his pigheadedness with his passion. He eventually got so sick of looking for support that he launched his own production company, EuropaCorp, which has become one of the most profitable in all of Europe by churning out the kind of carnivalesque shlock that made its founder so famous in the first place. Besson may not have directed the likes of “Taken,” “Lock-Out,” and “Colombiana,” but his fingerprints are all over them.

Read More Review: ‘Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets’ Is Like ‘Star Wars’ on Crystal Meth, and It’s Almost Crazy Enough to
See full article at Indiewire »
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