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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 1997

21-40 of 91 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Gaumont Names New Key Execs in Its Paris, L.A. Offices (Exclusive)

13 June 2017 8:02 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Gaumont, the film and TV studio behind “The Intouchables” and “Narcos,” has added several key execs to its global distribution team in Paris and Los Angeles.

Following the appointment of Vanessa Shapiro as president of Gaumont’s worldwide TV distribution and co-production earlier this year, Gaumont has tapped Cecilia Rossignol as VP of international TV sales and drama, Cherie Johnson was appointed VP of marketing, and Robby Amar joined the company as VP of TV acquisitions and distribution.

“2017 will be a year of significant growth for Gaumont, with over 40 drama series across multiple genres in development between our Los Angeles and Paris offices, and our new focus on acquisitions from third party producers,” said Shapiro. “The appointment of these highly respected and accomplished executives will be of paramount importance as we move into the production of new content over the next few months both in the U.S., and with our European co-production partners.”

Rossignol »

- Elsa Keslassy

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The avenger by Anne-Katrin Titze

13 June 2017 2:25 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Emmanuelle Devos on Frédéric Mermoud's Moka based on the novel by Tatiana de Rosnay: "The landscape does have an effect on your acting." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Moka star Emmanuelle Devos at the start of our conversation at the French Institute Alliance Française, mentioned seeing Laura Linney and Cynthia Nixon in Lillian Hellman's Little Foxes and Laurie Metcalf and Chris Cooper in Lucas Hnath's A Doll's House, Part 2 on Broadway. She has a long history with her first director, Arnaud Desplechin (My Sex Life... Or How I Got Into An Argument, Esther Kahn, A Christmas Tale, Kings & Queen), who also directed her son Raphaël Cohen in My Golden Days. Desplechin and Mathieu Amalric regular Grégoire Hetzel is Moka's co-composer. Emmanuelle and I had spoken at the Tribeca Film Festival with Jérôme Bonnell for his Le Temps De L'Aventure (Just A Sigh).

Marlène (Nathalie Baye) with Diane (Emmanuelle Devos »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Cannes Ends with…Awards — 3rd of 3

29 May 2017 12:30 PM, PDT | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

Cannes Ends with…Awards — 3rd of 3

The heightened security with machine gun armed soldiers and policemen constantly patrolling was intensified after the Manchester Massacre. With a pall over the festival, one minute of silence was observed for the 22 murdered and flags hung at half-mast. In addition to that, the sudden death at 57 of the Busan Film Festival deputy director Kim Ji-seok and that of the James Bond star Roger Moore brought the film world into a new perspective as we join the larger world to face the random indications of human mortality. High security vs. cinema as a sanctuary of freedom is highlighted this year like no other time that I can recall in my 31 years here.President of the jury, Pedro Almodovar

But life does go on, the jury judges, the stars get press attention on the red carpet and the rest of us continue to wait patiently in »

- Sydney Levine

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Cannes 2017 Winners Include ‘The Square,’ Sofia Coppola, Joaquin Phoenix, and More

29 May 2017 7:49 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Headed by Pedro Almodóvar, the 2017 Cannes Film Festival jury — also featuring Maren Ade, Jessica Chastain, Fan Bingbing, Agnès Jaoui, Park Chan-wook, Will Smith, Paolo Sorrentino, and Gabriel Yared — handed out their winners for the films in competition. Leading the pack is Ruben Östlund‘s Force Majeure follow-up The Square, which picked up the Palme d’Or, while Sofia Coppola earned Best Director — the first woman to do so since 1961, when Yuliya Solntseva won for Chronicle of Flaming Years, and only the second in Cannes history. Joaquin Phoenix and Diane Kruger picked up the top acting awards, while Nicole Kidman was given a special prize for the four projects she brought to Cannes.

Ahead of our picks for our favorite films (update: see them here), check out the complete list of winners below, along with other sections, as well as the jury’s discussion of their picks, as well as separate »

- Jordan Raup

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Cannes Awards: Controversial Swedish Satire ‘The Square’ Wins Palme d’Or

28 May 2017 10:25 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Cannes — The 70th anniversary Cannes Film Festival has wrapped, culminating with an unconventional awards ceremony in which Pedro Almodóvar and his jury bestowed a couple unexpected bonus prizes, including a tie for screenplay and a special award to Nicole Kidman, who appeared in four projects in this year’s official selection, including competition titles “The Killing of a Sacred Deer” and “The Beguiled,” season two of “Top of the Lake” and special screening “How to Talk to Girls at Parties.”

Meanwhile, the fabled Palme d’Or went to Swedish director Ruben Östlund’s cutting art-world (and real-world) satire “The Square,” which dares to bring aspects of conceptual and performance art into the sphere of cinema. The choice came as something of a surprise, if only because the masterful, 142-minute film has divided audiences so far, and jury prizes rely on consensus.

Östlund’s follow-up to Un Certain Regard winner “Force Majeure, »

- Peter Debruge

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9 Thoughts on Cannes 2017

27 May 2017 11:31 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Cannes Film Festival played host to some good movies this year (there is never a year when it doesn’t), yet throughout the 12-day event, there has been a pervasive feeling, shared by critics and distributors and publicists and audiences alike, that the festival’s been having a soft year, that the magic was tamped down. It had something do with the lack of a universally agreed upon home run, like “Toni Erdmann” or “Amour” or “4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days” or “Breaking the Waves.” (There were a handful of doubles and triples, but more disputes than not about all of them.) It had something to do with the new security system (long, slow lines to get through metal detectors), which freighted the simple act of walking into a movie with a touch of that airport depression. For all that, Cannes is still Cannes: the most momentous film festival in the world. »

- Owen Gleiberman

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Cannes 2017: Un Certain Regard winners revealed

27 May 2017 12:59 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Mohammad Rasoulof’s A Man Of Integrity among winners.

Mohammad Rasoulof’s A Man Of Integrity took home the Un Certain Regard Prize in Cannes’ Un Certain Regard strand, which presented 18 films from 22 countries.

The Iranian drama charts the story of a goldfish farmer who finds his principles under serious threat.

Jasmine Trinca won best actress for her performance in Fortunata by Sergio Castellito and best director went to Taylor Sheridan for Wind River.

Trinca plays a young mother fighting for her dream to open a hair salon in the well-sold Italian feature.

Elizabeth Olsen and Jeremy Renner star in Sheridan’s feature directorial debut about an inexperienced FBI investigator who teams up with a Wyoming game tracker to solve a murder on a Native American reservation.

The prize for ‘the best poetic narrative’ went to Mathieu Amalric’s Un Certain Regard opener Barbara and the jury prize went to Mexican director Michel Franco’s April’s Daughter »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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How Taylor Sheridan’s ‘Wind River’ Won an Award at Cannes

27 May 2017 12:18 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Last week, Taylor Sheridan went to Cannes for the first time with his directorial debut “Wind River,” a sharp thriller starring Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen set on a Native American reservation. It was Sheridan’s first trip to Europe, even though he wrote two Cannes and Oscar entries in a row, Denis Villeneuve’s “Sicario” and “Hell or High Water,” for which he was nominated for the Best Original Screenplay Oscar.

He went on to write and direct “Wind River” (August 4, The Weinstein Co.), which debuted at Sundance and won the Un Certain Regard mise-en-scene (directing) prize at Cannes Saturday. “It’s the first time I’ve won anything,” Sheridan told me on the phone from Wyoming, where he had been mushroom hunting.

Cannes doesn’t fly in writers, apparently. “I had to direct something,” he said. Being in the South of France was “pretty overwhelming, a whirlwind,” he said. »

- Anne Thompson

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How Taylor Sheridan’s ‘Wind River’ Won an Award at Cannes

27 May 2017 12:18 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Last week, Taylor Sheridan went to Cannes for the first time with his directorial debut “Wind River,” a sharp thriller starring Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen set on a Native American reservation. It was Sheridan’s first trip to Europe, even though he wrote two Cannes and Oscar entries in a row, Denis Villeneuve’s “Sicario” and “Hell or High Water,” for which he was nominated for the Best Original Screenplay Oscar.

He went on to write and direct “Wind River” (August 4, The Weinstein Co.), which debuted at Sundance and won the Un Certain Regard mise-en-scene (directing) prize at Cannes Saturday. “It’s the first time I’ve won anything,” Sheridan told me on the phone from Wyoming, where he had been mushroom hunting.

Cannes doesn’t fly in writers, apparently. “I had to direct something,” he said. Being in the South of France was “pretty overwhelming, a whirlwind,” he said. »

- Anne Thompson

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‘A Man of Integrity,’ ‘Wind River,’ ‘Barbara’ Take Un Certain Regard Awards at Cannes

27 May 2017 10:41 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Iranian filmmaker Mohammad Rasoulof’s “A Man of Integrity” won the top prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival this evening, beating a diverse international selection of 17 other titles to the honor. The award was presented by this year’s Un Certain Regard jury president Uma Thurman, heading a panel that also included filmmakers Joachim Lafosse and Mohamed Diab, actor Reda Kateb and Karlovy Vary festival director Karel Och.

Other prizewinners included U.S. writer-director Taylor Sheridan’s Sundance-premiered debut feature “Wind River” and actor-filmmaker Mathieu Amalric’s section opener “Barbara.”

More details to come in an update of this report. The full list of Un Certain Regard winners is as follows:

Un Certain Regard Award: “A Man of Integrity,” Mohammad Rasoulof

Best Director: Taylor Sheridan, “Wind River

Jury Prize: Michel Franco, “April’s Daughter

Jury Award for Performance: Jasmine Trinca, “Fortunata

Special Award for Poetry of Cinema: Mathieu Amalric, »

- Guy Lodge

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Cannes: Studiocanal’s ‘Radioactive,’ ’Russian Spy’ Nearly Sell Out International (Exclusive)

24 May 2017 11:07 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Cannes —  European film-tv powerhouse Studiocanal has nearly sold out in international at Cannes on its two big new English-language projects: Working Title-produced “Radioactive,” director Marjane Satrapi’s story of the loves, life and lasting importance of Marie Curie; and “The Tracking of a Russian Spy,” produced by The Picture Company and directed by Nima Nourizadeh (“Project X”).

In further business, Studiocanal’s two new French productions, the Gilles Lellouch-directed “Sink or Swim” and mainstream comedy “Marry Me, Dude” have proved market breakouts, pre-selling much of the world, a feat for French-language movies.

The robust business on Studiocanal’s Cannes market debutants proves that there is still a global market for high-profile larger upscale movies with pedigree producers. It also underscores something of a late surge in business announcements at Cannes this year, driven by its big sales players, from both the U.S. and Europe – and that much of the »

- John Hopewell and Elsa Keslassy

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Mathieu Amalric, Cédric Klapisch films on MK2 | Mile End slate

23 May 2017 2:40 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Fledgling Canadian distributor indulges in French passion.

Montreal-based upstart MK2 | Mile End has snapped up rights to a number of French auteur-driven titles led by Mathieu Amalric’s Un Certain Regard opener Barbara (pictured).

The distributor, recently launched by Paris-based MK2 and Metropole Films co-founding MD Charles Tremblay, struck a deal with Gaumont also yielded Guillaume Gallienne’s Maryline.

MK2 | Mile End acquired two from Pathé – Abdellatif Kechiche’s Mektoub Is Mektoub and Xavier Beauvois’ The Guardians, both of which are in post.

The distributor has signed three from Memento, taking Berlinale premiere The Midwife by Martin Provost, Xavier Giannoli’s in-production The Apparition, and Claire Darling by Julie Bertuccelli, which will star Catherine Deneuve and her daughter Chiara Mastroianni.

Rounding out the spree are Cédric Klapisch’s Back To Burgundy from StudioCanal, and Jean-Stephane Bron’s The Paris Opera from Les Films du Losange.

As part of its exclusive output deal with MK2 Films, MK2 l [link »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Mathieu Amalric, Cédric Klapisch on MK2 | Mile End slate

23 May 2017 2:40 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Fledgling Canadian distributor indulges in French passion.

Montreal-based upstart MK2 | Mile End has snapped up rights to a number of French auteur-driven titles led by Mathieu Amalric’s Un Certain Regard opener Barbara (pictured).

The distributor, recently launched by Paris-based MK2 and Metropole Films co-founding MD Charles Tremblay, struck a deal with Gaumont also yielded Guillaume Gallienne’s Maryline.

MK2 | Mile End acquired two from Pathé – Abdellatif Kechiche’s Mektoub Is Mektoub and Xavier Beauvois’ The Guardians, both of which are in post.

The distributor has signed three from Memento, taking Berlinale premiere The Midwife by Martin Provost, Xavier Giannoli’s in-production The Apparition, and Claire Darling by Julie Bertuccelli, which will star Catherine Deneuve and her daughter Chiara Mastroianni.

Rounding out the spree are Cédric Klapisch’s Back To Burgundy from StudioCanal, and Jean-Stephane Bron’s The Paris Opera from Les Films du Losange.

As part of its exclusive output deal with MK2 Films, MK2 l [link »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Marion Cotillard Talks ‘Ismael’s Ghosts’; Says “I Would Pay” To Do American Comedy – Cannes Studio

20 May 2017 4:21 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Oscar winner and Cannes Film Festival veteran Marion Cotillard reteams with director Arnaud Desplechin for Ismael’s Ghosts, which opened the festival this week. The two previously worked together in 1996’s My Sex Life… Or How I Got Into An Argument. We sat down recently with Cotillard to discuss the new movie and how things have evolved for her over the past 20 years. Ismael’s Ghosts is the story of a filmmaker (Mathieu Amalric) whose life is sent into a tailspin by the… »

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Jeanne Balibar Shines In Mathieu Amalric’s Messy & Incoherent ‘Barbara’ [Cannes Review]

19 May 2017 5:38 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

The ever prolific Mathieu Amalric, with his bulbous eyes that tempt to twitch at any given second, and frazzled, half-cracked smiles, is a brilliantly neurotic actor. It’s what makes watching him on screen so utterly compelling. But those qualities don’t always translate when they’re brought behind the camera as well. Case in point: “Barbara.” Stretching out the film-within-a-film trope to its outer limits, “Barbara” is Amalric’s ambitious attempt at detailing the creative process through the life of popular 1960s French singer Barbara.

Continue reading Jeanne Balibar Shines In Mathieu Amalric’s Messy & Incoherent ‘Barbara’ [Cannes Review] at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Barbara review – Mathieu Amalric's dreamlike, opaque biopic of the mysterious chanteuse

19 May 2017 2:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Jeanne Balibar is cast in the double role of the celebrated singer and an actor playing her in a haunting performance that harks back to Amalric’s burlesque study On Tour

To fans of the mononymous Barbara – the delicate-voiced, emotionally acute French chanteuse adored by everyone from Jacques Brel to François Mitterand – Mathieu Amalric’s mega-meta, dreamily blurred biopic-within-a-film may seem a bemusing tribute to a national icon. To those unfamiliar with the singer and her work – which is to say the vast majority of people outside Francophone territory – this film is likely to be a more perplexing experience still: an elusive ghost of a celebrity portrait, a meditation on likeness and impersonation in which the subject, the actor and the performance become difficult to prise apart on screen.

Once you settle into your bewilderment, however, Barbara an oddly alluring film that does a double backflip on hokey showbiz-bio convention: »

- Guy Lodge

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'Barbara': Film Review | Cannes 2017

18 May 2017 3:05 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Actor-writer-director Mathieu Amalric and actor-singer Jeanne Balibar pay tribute to one of France’s most unusual and gifted mid-20th century chanteuses with Barbara. A self-eating snake of a movie about a director (Amalric) and a singer-actress (Balibar) trying themselves to make a movie about the French singer Barbara (who was born Monique Serf in 1930), this is a self-reflexive and sometimes screamingly self-indulgent work that’s strictly for hardcore French viewers and festivals. And yet, it still manages to be fitfully compelling, thanks especially to Balibar and the real Barbara, who died in 1997 but appears throughout via film clips and songs.

»

- Leslie Felperin

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Cannes Film Review: ‘Barbara’

18 May 2017 10:56 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

While her star continues to shine brightly in France 20 years after her death, the singer Barbara remains a lesser-known artist in other parts of Europe, not to mention on the other side of the pond. Presumably the producers of “Barbara” knew that and won’t be expecting brisk sales even with the opening slot in Cannes’ Un Certain Regard. Designed as a sort of meta-film in which Jeanne Balibar (refreshingly unaffected) is an actress playing Barbara in a film made by an obsessed director — Mathieu Amalric doing double duty as actor and director — the movie lightly plumbs that dangerously unsettled space between performing and literally being the protagonist in a biopic. “Barbara” is also a tribute to the singer’s prodigious talent and her undiminished emotional pull, but will struggle to find ticket buyers beyond her francophone fan base.

It’s hard to find a singer outside of France to »

- Jay Weissberg

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Cannes 2017. Past Upon Present—Arnaud Desplechin’s “Ismael’s Ghosts”

17 May 2017 4:08 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

If last year saw Olivier Assayas doing his version of a ghost story with Personal Shopper, this year, it apparently fell upon French contemporary Arnaud Desplechin to do the same with Ismael’s Ghosts, the (uncharacteristically) interesting opening film of the 70th Cannes Film Festival. Anyone expecting Desplechin to go full genre, though, will likely be disappointed, which is to say that Ismael’s Ghosts isn't much of a ghost story—or at least not any more of a ghost story than any of his other films, from his debut feature, the beautifully titled La vie des morts (1991), to his most recent, the coming-of-age drama My Golden Days (2015). What is a ghost story, after all, except the present being haunted by the past? Drawing from a vast array of references, Desplechin weaves together stories and fragments of stories that shift to and fro with wild abandon. Here, Ismaël Vuillard (a »

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Gathering lavender by Anne-Katrin Titze

17 May 2017 12:43 PM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Nicole Garcia on Marion Cotillard: "I find her very spontaneous and very unpredictable in this movie."

Tonight, Marion Cotillard is walking the Cannes Film Festival opening night red carpet for Arnaud Desplechin's Ismael’s Ghosts (Les Fantômes D'Ismaël), in which she stars with Charlotte Gainsbourg and Mathieu Amalric (who stars in his own film Barbara with Jeanne Balibar and Lisa Ray-Jacobs in the Directors' Fortnight program).

In my conversation with From The Land Of The Moon (Mal De Pierres) director Nicole Garcia she reveals how Marion Cotillard works on her character, explains the choices from costume designer Catherine Leterrier (Danièle Thompson's Cézanne Et Moi and Benoît Jacquot's 3 Coeurs), and shares the advice from Frantz director François Ozon on choosing a foreign language film title.

Nicole Garcia on the novel by Milena Agus: "I talked to Marion Cotillard about the book years ago." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

In »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 1997

21-40 of 91 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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