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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 1997

1-20 of 81 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Nyff Announces 2017 Main Slate, Including ‘Call Me By Your Name,’ ‘The Florida Project,’ ‘Lady Bird,’ and More

8 August 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

It’s beginning to look a lot like fall festival season. On the heels of announcements from Tiff and Venice, the 55th edition of the New York Film Festival has unveiled its Main Slate, including a number of returning faces, emerging talents, and some of the most anticipated films from the festival circuit this year.

This year’s Main Slate showcases a number of films honored at Cannes including Ruben Östlund’s Palme d’Or–winner “The Square,” Robin Campillo’s “Bpm,” and Agnès Varda & Jr’s “Faces Places.” Other Cannes standouts, including “The Rider” and “The Florida Project,” will also screen at Nyff.

Read MoreTIFF Reveals First Slate of 2017 Titles, Including ‘The Shape of Water,’ ‘Downsizing,’ and ‘Call Me By Your Name

Elsewhere, Aki Kaurismäki’s Silver Bear–winner “The Other Side of Hope” and Agnieszka Holland’s Alfred Bauer Prize–winner “Spoor” come to Nyff after Berlin bows. »

- Kate Erbland

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‘Creepy’ Review: ‘Pulse’ Director Kiyoshi Kurosawa Returns to Form with a Chiller That Lives Up to Its Title

3 August 2017 11:23 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

According to a lecture given early in “Creepy,” serial killers are broken down into three categories: organized, disorganized, and mixed characteristic. The first two are relatively easy to define, and thus simpler to track down. Mixed-characteristic killers, meanwhile, exhibit no discernible patterns. They’re puzzles, anomalies. You can probably guess which class of killer this detective story from Kiyoshi Kurosawa follows.

The director, whose genre mastery is most evident in the likes of “Pulse” and “Cure,” more recently delved into this territory in “Daguerreotype.” That old-fashioned haunt took him outside Japan with the help of Tahar Rahim, Olivier Gourmet, and Mathieu Amalric; “Creepy” is both a return home and a return to form. Here he’s woven a procedural yarn from a novel by Yutaka Maekawa that was either loosely adapted or strikingly aligned with the director’s long-established sensibilities.

Read MoreNew Films By Terence Davies & Kiyoshi Kurosawa Set Berlin Premieres, »

- Michael Nordine

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‘Tomorrow and Thereafter’ Review: A Family Drama That’s Almost Powerful But Even More Disappointing — Locarno 2017

2 August 2017 3:11 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

With its cluttered bedrooms and eye-popping primary-colored scarfs and skirts, Noémie Lvovsky’s “Tomorrow and Thereafter” is a film of tactile pleasures. Its inhabitants move through a world dense with thousands of miniscule details, and just as surely as they stuff their sitting rooms with gimcracks and mismatched furniture do they also ultimately submit them to destruction. Wedding dress hems trawled along wet pavements, school uniforms caked in mud, curtains ablaze in the middle of a living room: these crowded domestic worlds collide with the very real consequences of their owners’ eccentricities and psychological troubles.

But as smart as the filmmakers are in their good taste in costume and as shrewdly as they dress their sets with an eye for detail that would make James Gray blush, so too do they ultimately withdraw from the intensity of emotion that is suggested by the subject matter. For a film about a »

- Christopher Small

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Locarno Film Review: ‘Tomorrow and Thereafter’

2 August 2017 2:05 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Stories for kids are allowed a certain leeway when it comes to background and believability: No one really gets hung up on not knowing why Little Red Riding Hood’s granny lives in the middle of the woods, or even why Red doesn’t have a real name. In film, it’s pretty much the same, yet when it’s a movie meant for adults about a child, and the adult audience is supposed to be guided into reconnecting with the fears and loneliness of their nine-year-old selves, then more of the “whys” are needed.

With “Tomorrow and Thereafter,” actress-director Noémi Lvovsky expects viewers to be so taken with her young protagonist and her unbalanced mother that they’ll treat the whole thing as a precious fairy tale of peril and liberation, yet there’s something so deeply personal here (or perhaps so deeply French) that it’s difficult to imagine just who it’s made for »

- Jay Weissberg

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Luc Besson Movies Ranked from Worst to Best

20 July 2017 7:54 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Too Hollywood for art houses and too art house for Hollywood, iconoclastic French filmmaker Luc Besson has always had to blaze his own trail. Unwilling — or unable — to compromise from the very start (his debut feature was a dialogue-free post-apocalyptic drama about a waterless future where it occasionally rains fish), Besson continues to offset his pigheadedness with his passion. He eventually got so sick of looking for support that he launched his own production company, EuropaCorp, which has become one of the most profitable in all of Europe by churning out the kind of carnivalesque shlock that made its founder so famous in the first place. Besson may not have directed the likes of “Taken,” “Lock-Out,” and “Colombiana,” but his fingerprints are all over them.

Read More Review: ‘Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets’ Is Like ‘Star Wars’ on Crystal Meth, and It’s Almost Crazy Enough to »

- David Ehrlich

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Locarno Festival 2017 Lineup: The Best Summer Movie Counterprogramming You Could Ask For

15 July 2017 10:53 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The summer movie season may start winding down by early August, but for cinephiles, that’s when the real fun begins. While the fall season festivals — epitomized by the trio of awards season influencers Telluride, Toronto and New York — are a massive platform for major prestige titles at the end of the year, the Locarno Film Festival has the jump on all of them, and provides the most diverse range of cinema you’ll see anywhere in the world.

The 70th edition, announced this week, provides the latest example. No festival embodies the “something for everyone” philosophy better than Locarno, which complements its cinephile-oriented sections with another one exclusively designed for wider audiences. That would be the Piazza Grande, where 16 features screen outdoors for an audience of 8,000 people. But rather than simply showcasing the same summer blockbusters that have dominated the box office, the Piazza features international efforts well suited to pleasing massive crowds, »

- Eric Kohn

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Locarno Festival 2017 line-up revealed

12 July 2017 5:00 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Atomic Blonde, The Big Sick, The Song Of Scorpions among line-up.

The line-up for the 70th Locarno Festival (Aug 2-12) in Switzerland has been announced.

Scroll down for the full line-up

The 16-strong Piazza Grande strand features 11 world premieres, including opening night film Tomorrow And Every Other Day directed by Noemie Lvovsky and starring Mathieu Amalric, and closing night music doc Gotthard - One Life, One Soul, about the swiss rock band.

Other Piazza Grande films include Atomic Blonde with Charlize Theron, Good Time starring Robert Pattinson, Kumail Nanjiani’s The Big Sick, What Happened to Monday? with Glenn Close and the world premiere of Anup Singh’s The Song of Scorpions, starring Irrfan Khan, who will attend the festival.

Actor and director Mathieu Kassovitz will receive the festival’s 2017 excellence award and Nastassja Kinski will be honoured with a lifetime achievement award.

Michel Merkt (Toni Erdmann, Elle) will receive the festival’s best independent producer award.

As »

- orlando.parfitt@screendaily.com (Orlando Parfitt)

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Locarno Festival Unveils Lineup for 70th Edition, Including 'The Big Sick,' 'Atomic Blonde'

12 July 2017 1:30 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Switzerland's Locarno Festival is entering its 70th year with a diverse lineup of pictures that has become characteristic of the annual film gathering which attracts top independent film talent from around the world. 

With a look to the future, the event has rebranded itself as simply the Locarno Festival, with new initiatives including a Locarno Kids section and a Youth Advisory Board. 

This year's opening night film is Noemie Lvovsky's dark drama Tomorrow and Thereafter, starring Mathieu Amalric. And the festival will close with a rock tribute film from Kevin Merz: Gotthard – One Life, One Soul. 

Other Piazza Grande events include the critically lauded The »

- Ariston Anderson

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Bypassed Palme d'Or Contenders Academy Award Chances? From Haneke's Latest to Pattinson Thriller

20 June 2017 8:14 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Good Time' with Robert Pattinson: All but completely bypassed at the Cannes Film Festival, Ben and Joshua Safdie's crime thriller – co-written by Joshua Safdie and Ronald Bronstein – may turn out to be a key contender in various categories next awards season. Bypassed Palme d'Or contenders (See previous post re: Cannes winners Diane Kruger & Sofia Coppola's Oscar chances.) The Cannes Film Festival has historically been both U.S.- and eurocentric. In other words, filmmaking from other countries in the Americas, Africa, Asia, and the Pacific tend to be ignored either at the awards ceremony or at the very outset – in other words, they don't even get the chance to compete for the Palme d'Or. This year was no different, with a mere two non-u.S., non-European productions (or co-productions) among the 19 films in the Official Competition: Naomi Kawase's Japanese romantic drama Radiance and Hong Sang-soo's South Korean romantic drama The Day After. Both came out empty-handed. Among the other movies that failed to win any of the Official Competition awards, several may have a shot in some category or other come Oscar time. Notably: The socially conscious family drama Happy End, produced by veteran Margaret Ménégoz (Pauline at the Beach, Europa Europa) and a Sony Pictures Classics release in North America. Dir.: Michael Haneke. Cast: Isabelle Huppert. Jean-Louis Trintignant. Mathieu Kassovitz. The mix of time-bending mystery and family drama Wonderstruck, a Roadside Attractions / Amazon Studios release (on Oct. 20) in the U.S. Dir.: Todd Haynes. Cast: Julianne Moore. Millicent Simmonds. Cory Michael Smith. The crime drama Good Time, an A24 release (on Aug. 11) in the U.S. Dir.: Ben and Joshua Safdie. Cast: Robert Pattinson. Jennifer Jason Leigh. Barkhad Abdi. Cannes non-win doesn't mean weaker Oscar chances It's good to remember that the lack of a Cannes Film Festival win doesn't necessarily reduce a film's, a director's, a screenwriter's, or a performer's Oscar chances. Case in point: last year's Cannes Best Actress “loser” Isabelle Huppert for Elle. Here are a few other recent examples of Cannes non-winners in specific categories that went on to receive Oscar nods: Carol (2015), Best Actress (Cate Blanchett) nominee. Two Days, One Night / Deux jours, une nuit (2014), Best Actress (Marion Cotillard) nominee. The Great Beauty / La grande bellezza (2013), Best Foreign Language Film winner. The Hunt / Jagten (2012), Best Foreign Language Film nominee (at the 2013 Academy Awards). The Artist (2011), Best Picture and Best Director (Michel Hazanavicius) Oscar winner. And here's a special case: Amour leading lady and 2012 Best Actress Oscar nominee Emmanuelle Riva could not have won the Best Actress Award at Cannes, as current festival rules prevent Palme d'Or winners from taking home any other Official Competition awards. In other words, Isabelle Huppert (again), Julianne Moore, and Robert Pattinson – and their respective films – could theoretically remain strong Oscar contenders despite the absence of Cannes Film Festival Official Competition victories. Mohammad Rasoulof and Leslie Caron among other notable Cannes winners Besides those already mentioned in this article, notable winners at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival include: Mohammad Rasoulof's A Man of Integrity. Having infuriated Iran's theocracy, in 2010 Rasoulof was sentenced to a year in prison following accusations of “filming without a permit.” He has been out on bail. In 2011, Rasoulof won the Un Certain Regard sidebar's Best Director Award for Goodbye. Two years later, his Un Certain Regard entry Manuscripts Don't Burn won the International Film Critics' Fipresci Prize. Veteran Leslie Caron and her 17-year-old pet rescue dog Tchi Tchi shared the Palm DogManitarian Award for their work in the British television series The Durrells in Corfu / The Durrells. Caron, who will be turning 86 on July 1, made her film debut in Vincente Minnelli's 1951 musical An American in Paris – that year's Best Picture Academy Award winner. She would be shortlisted twice for the Best Actress Oscar: Lili (1953) and The L-Shaped Room (1963). Last year, she was the subject of Larry Weinstein's documentary Leslie Caron: The Reluctant Star and will next be seen in Thomas Brunot's short The Perfect Age. Faces Places / Visages, villages, which offers a tour of the French countryside, won Cannes' Golden Eye Award for Best Documentary. The directors are veteran Agnès Varda (Cléo from 5 to 7, Vagabond), who turned 89 on May 30, and photographer/muralist Jr. Faces Places is supposed to be Varda's swan song, following a career spanning more than six decades. Her 2008 César-winning documentary The Beaches of Agnès was one of the 15 semi-finalists for the Best Documentary Feature Oscar. See below a comprehensive list of the 2017 Cannes Film Festival winners. Leslie Caron in 'The Durrells in Corfu.' TV series a.k.a. 'The Durrells' earned the veteran two-time Best Actress Oscar nominee ('Lili,' 1953; 'The L-Shaped Room,' 1963) and her dog companion Tchi Tchi this year's Palm DogManitarian Award at the Cannes Film Festival. 2017 Cannes Film Festival winners Official Competition Palme d'Or: The Square (dir.: Ruben Östlund). Grand Prix: 120 Beats per Minute (dir.: Robin Campillo). Jury Prize: Loveless (dir.: Andrey Zvyagintsev). Best Screenplay (tie): The Killing of a Sacred Deer, Yorgos Lanthimos & Efthymis Filippou. You Were Never Really Here, Lynne Ramsay. Best Actress: Diane Kruger, In the Fade. Best Actor: Joaquin Phoenix, You Were Never Really Here. Best Director: Sofia Coppola, The Beguiled. Best Short Film: A Gentle Night (dir.: Qiu Yang). Short Film Special Mention: Katto (dir.: Teppo Airaksinen).   Un Certain Regard Un Certain Regard Award: A Man of Integrity (dir.: Mohammad Rasoulof). Jury Prize: April's Daughter / Las hijas de abril (dir.: Michel Franco). Best Director: Taylor Sheridan, Wind River. Best Actress / Best Performance: Jasmine Trinca, Fortunata. Prize for Best Poetic Narrative: Barbara (dir.: Mathieu Amalric).   International Film Critics' Fipresci Prize Official Competition:  120 Beats per Minute. Un Certain Regard: Closeness (dir.: Kantemir Balagov). Directors' Fortnight: The Nothing Factory / A Fábrica de Nada (dir.: Pedro Pinho).   Directors' Fortnight / Quinzaine des Réalisateurs Prix Sacd (Société des Auteurs Compositeurs Dramatiques) (tie): Lover for a Day / L'amant d'un jour (dir.: Philippe Garrel). Let the Sunshine In / Un beau soleil intérieur (dir.: Claire Denis). C.I.C.A.E. Art Cinema Award: The Rider (dir.: Chloe Zhao). Europa Cinemas Label: A Ciambra (dir.: Jonas Carpignano). Prix Illy for Best Short Film: Back to Genoa City / Retour à Genoa City (dir.: Benoît Grimalt).   Critics' Week Grand Prize: Makala (dir.: Emmanuel Gras). Visionary Award: Gabriel and the Mountain / Gabriel e a Montanha (dir.: Fellipe Barbosa). Gan Foundation Award for Distribution: Version Originale Condor, French distributor of Gabriel and the Mountain. Sacd Award: Léa Mysius, Ava. Discovery Award for Best Short Film: Los desheredados (dir.: Laura Ferrés). Canal+ Award for Best Short Film: The Best Fireworks Ever / Najpienkniejsze Fajerwerki Ever (dir.: Aleksandra Terpinska).   Other Cannes Film Festival 2017 Awards 70th Anniversary prize: Nicole Kidman. Caméra d'Or for Best First Film: Montparnasse Bienvenue / Jeune femme (dir.: Léonor Serraille). Golden Eye Award for Best Documentary: Faces Places / Visages, Villages (dir.: Agnès Varda, Jr). Prize of the Ecumenical Jury: Radiance (dir.: Naomi Kawase). Queer Palm: 120 Beats per Minute. Queer Palm for Best Short Film: Islands / Les îles (dir.: Yann Gonzalez). Cannes Soundtrack Award for Best Composer: Daniel Lopatin, Good Time. Vulcan Prize for Artist Technicians: Josefin Åsberg, The Square. Kering Women in Motion Award: Isabelle Huppert. Palm Dog: Einstein the Dog for The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected). Palm DogManitarian Award: Leslie Caron and the dog Tchi Tchi for The Durrells in Corfu. Chopard Trophy for Male/Female Revelation: George MacKay and Anya Taylor-Joy.   This article was originally published at Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/). »

- Steph Mont.

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Gaumont Names New Key Execs in Its Paris, L.A. Offices (Exclusive)

13 June 2017 8:02 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Gaumont, the film and TV studio behind “The Intouchables” and “Narcos,” has added several key execs to its global distribution team in Paris and Los Angeles.

Following the appointment of Vanessa Shapiro as president of Gaumont’s worldwide TV distribution and co-production earlier this year, Gaumont has tapped Cecilia Rossignol as VP of international TV sales and drama, Cherie Johnson was appointed VP of marketing, and Robby Amar joined the company as VP of TV acquisitions and distribution.

“2017 will be a year of significant growth for Gaumont, with over 40 drama series across multiple genres in development between our Los Angeles and Paris offices, and our new focus on acquisitions from third party producers,” said Shapiro. “The appointment of these highly respected and accomplished executives will be of paramount importance as we move into the production of new content over the next few months both in the U.S., and with our European co-production partners. »

- Elsa Keslassy

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Gaumont Names New Key Execs in Its Paris, L.A. Offices (Exclusive)

13 June 2017 8:02 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Gaumont, the film and TV studio behind “The Intouchables” and “Narcos,” has added several key execs to its global distribution team in Paris and Los Angeles.

Following the appointment of Vanessa Shapiro as president of Gaumont’s worldwide TV distribution and co-production earlier this year, Gaumont has tapped Cecilia Rossignol as VP of international TV sales and drama, Cherie Johnson was appointed VP of marketing, and Robby Amar joined the company as VP of TV acquisitions and distribution.

“2017 will be a year of significant growth for Gaumont, with over 40 drama series across multiple genres in development between our Los Angeles and Paris offices, and our new focus on acquisitions from third party producers,” said Shapiro. “The appointment of these highly respected and accomplished executives will be of paramount importance as we move into the production of new content over the next few months both in the U.S., and with our European co-production partners.”

Rossignol »

- Elsa Keslassy

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The avenger by Anne-Katrin Titze

13 June 2017 2:25 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Emmanuelle Devos on Frédéric Mermoud's Moka based on the novel by Tatiana de Rosnay: "The landscape does have an effect on your acting." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Moka star Emmanuelle Devos at the start of our conversation at the French Institute Alliance Française, mentioned seeing Laura Linney and Cynthia Nixon in Lillian Hellman's Little Foxes and Laurie Metcalf and Chris Cooper in Lucas Hnath's A Doll's House, Part 2 on Broadway. She has a long history with her first director, Arnaud Desplechin (My Sex Life... Or How I Got Into An Argument, Esther Kahn, A Christmas Tale, Kings & Queen), who also directed her son Raphaël Cohen in My Golden Days. Desplechin and Mathieu Amalric regular Grégoire Hetzel is Moka's co-composer. Emmanuelle and I had spoken at the Tribeca Film Festival with Jérôme Bonnell for his Le Temps De L'Aventure (Just A Sigh).

Marlène (Nathalie Baye) with Diane (Emmanuelle Devos »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Cannes Ends with…Awards — 3rd of 3

29 May 2017 12:30 PM, PDT | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

Cannes Ends with…Awards — 3rd of 3

The heightened security with machine gun armed soldiers and policemen constantly patrolling was intensified after the Manchester Massacre. With a pall over the festival, one minute of silence was observed for the 22 murdered and flags hung at half-mast. In addition to that, the sudden death at 57 of the Busan Film Festival deputy director Kim Ji-seok and that of the James Bond star Roger Moore brought the film world into a new perspective as we join the larger world to face the random indications of human mortality. High security vs. cinema as a sanctuary of freedom is highlighted this year like no other time that I can recall in my 31 years here.President of the jury, Pedro Almodovar

But life does go on, the jury judges, the stars get press attention on the red carpet and the rest of us continue to wait patiently in »

- Sydney Levine

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Cannes 2017 Winners Include ‘The Square,’ Sofia Coppola, Joaquin Phoenix, and More

29 May 2017 7:49 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Headed by Pedro Almodóvar, the 2017 Cannes Film Festival jury — also featuring Maren Ade, Jessica Chastain, Fan Bingbing, Agnès Jaoui, Park Chan-wook, Will Smith, Paolo Sorrentino, and Gabriel Yared — handed out their winners for the films in competition. Leading the pack is Ruben Östlund‘s Force Majeure follow-up The Square, which picked up the Palme d’Or, while Sofia Coppola earned Best Director — the first woman to do so since 1961, when Yuliya Solntseva won for Chronicle of Flaming Years, and only the second in Cannes history. Joaquin Phoenix and Diane Kruger picked up the top acting awards, while Nicole Kidman was given a special prize for the four projects she brought to Cannes.

Ahead of our picks for our favorite films (update: see them here), check out the complete list of winners below, along with other sections, as well as the jury’s discussion of their picks, as well as separate »

- Jordan Raup

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Cannes Awards: Controversial Swedish Satire ‘The Square’ Wins Palme d’Or

28 May 2017 10:25 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Cannes — The 70th anniversary Cannes Film Festival has wrapped, culminating with an unconventional awards ceremony in which Pedro Almodóvar and his jury bestowed a couple unexpected bonus prizes, including a tie for screenplay and a special award to Nicole Kidman, who appeared in four projects in this year’s official selection, including competition titles “The Killing of a Sacred Deer” and “The Beguiled,” season two of “Top of the Lake” and special screening “How to Talk to Girls at Parties.”

Meanwhile, the fabled Palme d’Or went to Swedish director Ruben Östlund’s cutting art-world (and real-world) satire “The Square,” which dares to bring aspects of conceptual and performance art into the sphere of cinema. The choice came as something of a surprise, if only because the masterful, 142-minute film has divided audiences so far, and jury prizes rely on consensus.

Östlund’s follow-up to Un Certain Regard winner “Force Majeure, »

- Peter Debruge

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9 Thoughts on Cannes 2017

27 May 2017 11:31 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Cannes Film Festival played host to some good movies this year (there is never a year when it doesn’t), yet throughout the 12-day event, there has been a pervasive feeling, shared by critics and distributors and publicists and audiences alike, that the festival’s been having a soft year, that the magic was tamped down. It had something do with the lack of a universally agreed upon home run, like “Toni Erdmann” or “Amour” or “4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days” or “Breaking the Waves.” (There were a handful of doubles and triples, but more disputes than not about all of them.) It had something to do with the new security system (long, slow lines to get through metal detectors), which freighted the simple act of walking into a movie with a touch of that airport depression. For all that, Cannes is still Cannes: the most momentous film festival in the world. »

- Owen Gleiberman

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Cannes 2017: Un Certain Regard winners revealed

27 May 2017 12:59 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Mohammad Rasoulof’s A Man Of Integrity among winners.

Mohammad Rasoulof’s A Man Of Integrity took home the Un Certain Regard Prize in Cannes’ Un Certain Regard strand, which presented 18 films from 22 countries.

The Iranian drama charts the story of a goldfish farmer who finds his principles under serious threat.

Jasmine Trinca won best actress for her performance in Fortunata by Sergio Castellito and best director went to Taylor Sheridan for Wind River.

Trinca plays a young mother fighting for her dream to open a hair salon in the well-sold Italian feature.

Elizabeth Olsen and Jeremy Renner star in Sheridan’s feature directorial debut about an inexperienced FBI investigator who teams up with a Wyoming game tracker to solve a murder on a Native American reservation.

The prize for ‘the best poetic narrative’ went to Mathieu Amalric’s Un Certain Regard opener Barbara and the jury prize went to Mexican director Michel Franco’s April’s Daughter »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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How Taylor Sheridan’s ‘Wind River’ Won an Award at Cannes

27 May 2017 12:18 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Last week, Taylor Sheridan went to Cannes for the first time with his directorial debut “Wind River,” a sharp thriller starring Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen set on a Native American reservation. It was Sheridan’s first trip to Europe, even though he wrote two Cannes and Oscar entries in a row, Denis Villeneuve’s “Sicario” and “Hell or High Water,” for which he was nominated for the Best Original Screenplay Oscar.

He went on to write and direct “Wind River” (August 4, The Weinstein Co.), which debuted at Sundance and won the Un Certain Regard mise-en-scene (directing) prize at Cannes Saturday. “It’s the first time I’ve won anything,” Sheridan told me on the phone from Wyoming, where he had been mushroom hunting.

Cannes doesn’t fly in writers, apparently. “I had to direct something,” he said. Being in the South of France was “pretty overwhelming, a whirlwind,” he said. »

- Anne Thompson

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How Taylor Sheridan’s ‘Wind River’ Won an Award at Cannes

27 May 2017 12:18 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Last week, Taylor Sheridan went to Cannes for the first time with his directorial debut “Wind River,” a sharp thriller starring Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen set on a Native American reservation. It was Sheridan’s first trip to Europe, even though he wrote two Cannes and Oscar entries in a row, Denis Villeneuve’s “Sicario” and “Hell or High Water,” for which he was nominated for the Best Original Screenplay Oscar.

He went on to write and direct “Wind River” (August 4, The Weinstein Co.), which debuted at Sundance and won the Un Certain Regard mise-en-scene (directing) prize at Cannes Saturday. “It’s the first time I’ve won anything,” Sheridan told me on the phone from Wyoming, where he had been mushroom hunting.

Cannes doesn’t fly in writers, apparently. “I had to direct something,” he said. Being in the South of France was “pretty overwhelming, a whirlwind,” he said. »

- Anne Thompson

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‘A Man of Integrity,’ ‘Wind River,’ ‘Barbara’ Take Un Certain Regard Awards at Cannes

27 May 2017 10:41 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Iranian filmmaker Mohammad Rasoulof’s “A Man of Integrity” won the top prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival this evening, beating a diverse international selection of 17 other titles to the honor. The award was presented by this year’s Un Certain Regard jury president Uma Thurman, heading a panel that also included filmmakers Joachim Lafosse and Mohamed Diab, actor Reda Kateb and Karlovy Vary festival director Karel Och.

Other prizewinners included U.S. writer-director Taylor Sheridan’s Sundance-premiered debut feature “Wind River” and actor-filmmaker Mathieu Amalric’s section opener “Barbara.”

More details to come in an update of this report. The full list of Un Certain Regard winners is as follows:

Un Certain Regard Award: “A Man of Integrity,” Mohammad Rasoulof

Best Director: Taylor Sheridan, “Wind River

Jury Prize: Michel Franco, “April’s Daughter

Jury Award for Performance: Jasmine Trinca, “Fortunata

Special Award for Poetry of Cinema: Mathieu Amalric, »

- Guy Lodge

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