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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 1997

1-20 of 61 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Cannes: Studiocanal’s ‘Radioactive,’ ’Russian Spy’ Nearly Sell Out International (Exclusive)

16 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Cannes —  European film-tv powerhouse Studiocanal has nearly sold out in international at Cannes on its two big new English-language projects: Working Title-produced “Radioactive,” director Marjane Satrapi’s story of the loves, life and lasting importance of Marie Curie; and “The Tracking of a Russian Spy,” produced by The Picture Company and directed by Nima Nourizadeh (“Project X”).

In further business, Studiocanal’s two new French productions, the Gilles Lellouch-directed “Sink or Swim” and mainstream comedy “Marry Me, Dude” have proved market breakouts, pre-selling much of the world, a feat for French-language movies.

The robust business on Studiocanal’s Cannes market debutants proves that there is still a global market for high-profile larger upscale movies with pedigree producers. It also underscores something of a late surge in business announcements at Cannes this year, driven by its big sales players, from both the U.S. and Europe – and that much of the »

- John Hopewell and Elsa Keslassy

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Mathieu Amalric, Cédric Klapisch films on MK2 | Mile End slate

23 May 2017 2:40 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Fledgling Canadian distributor indulges in French passion.

Montreal-based upstart MK2 | Mile End has snapped up rights to a number of French auteur-driven titles led by Mathieu Amalric’s Un Certain Regard opener Barbara (pictured).

The distributor, recently launched by Paris-based MK2 and Metropole Films co-founding MD Charles Tremblay, struck a deal with Gaumont also yielded Guillaume Gallienne’s Maryline.

MK2 | Mile End acquired two from Pathé – Abdellatif Kechiche’s Mektoub Is Mektoub and Xavier Beauvois’ The Guardians, both of which are in post.

The distributor has signed three from Memento, taking Berlinale premiere The Midwife by Martin Provost, Xavier Giannoli’s in-production The Apparition, and Claire Darling by Julie Bertuccelli, which will star Catherine Deneuve and her daughter Chiara Mastroianni.

Rounding out the spree are Cédric Klapisch’s Back To Burgundy from StudioCanal, and Jean-Stephane Bron’s The Paris Opera from Les Films du Losange.

As part of its exclusive output deal with MK2 Films, MK2 l [link »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Mathieu Amalric, Cédric Klapisch on MK2 | Mile End slate

23 May 2017 2:40 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Fledgling Canadian distributor indulges in French passion.

Montreal-based upstart MK2 | Mile End has snapped up rights to a number of French auteur-driven titles led by Mathieu Amalric’s Un Certain Regard opener Barbara (pictured).

The distributor, recently launched by Paris-based MK2 and Metropole Films co-founding MD Charles Tremblay, struck a deal with Gaumont also yielded Guillaume Gallienne’s Maryline.

MK2 | Mile End acquired two from Pathé – Abdellatif Kechiche’s Mektoub Is Mektoub and Xavier Beauvois’ The Guardians, both of which are in post.

The distributor has signed three from Memento, taking Berlinale premiere The Midwife by Martin Provost, Xavier Giannoli’s in-production The Apparition, and Claire Darling by Julie Bertuccelli, which will star Catherine Deneuve and her daughter Chiara Mastroianni.

Rounding out the spree are Cédric Klapisch’s Back To Burgundy from StudioCanal, and Jean-Stephane Bron’s The Paris Opera from Les Films du Losange.

As part of its exclusive output deal with MK2 Films, MK2 l [link »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Marion Cotillard Talks ‘Ismael’s Ghosts’; Says “I Would Pay” To Do American Comedy – Cannes Studio

20 May 2017 4:21 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Oscar winner and Cannes Film Festival veteran Marion Cotillard reteams with director Arnaud Desplechin for Ismael’s Ghosts, which opened the festival this week. The two previously worked together in 1996’s My Sex Life… Or How I Got Into An Argument. We sat down recently with Cotillard to discuss the new movie and how things have evolved for her over the past 20 years. Ismael’s Ghosts is the story of a filmmaker (Mathieu Amalric) whose life is sent into a tailspin by the… »

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Jeanne Balibar Shines In Mathieu Amalric’s Messy & Incoherent ‘Barbara’ [Cannes Review]

19 May 2017 5:38 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

The ever prolific Mathieu Amalric, with his bulbous eyes that tempt to twitch at any given second, and frazzled, half-cracked smiles, is a brilliantly neurotic actor. It’s what makes watching him on screen so utterly compelling. But those qualities don’t always translate when they’re brought behind the camera as well. Case in point: “Barbara.” Stretching out the film-within-a-film trope to its outer limits, “Barbara” is Amalric’s ambitious attempt at detailing the creative process through the life of popular 1960s French singer Barbara.

Continue reading Jeanne Balibar Shines In Mathieu Amalric’s Messy & Incoherent ‘Barbara’ [Cannes Review] at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Barbara review – Mathieu Amalric's dreamlike, opaque biopic of the mysterious chanteuse

19 May 2017 2:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Jeanne Balibar is cast in the double role of the celebrated singer and an actor playing her in a haunting performance that harks back to Amalric’s burlesque study On Tour

To fans of the mononymous Barbara – the delicate-voiced, emotionally acute French chanteuse adored by everyone from Jacques Brel to François Mitterand – Mathieu Amalric’s mega-meta, dreamily blurred biopic-within-a-film may seem a bemusing tribute to a national icon. To those unfamiliar with the singer and her work – which is to say the vast majority of people outside Francophone territory – this film is likely to be a more perplexing experience still: an elusive ghost of a celebrity portrait, a meditation on likeness and impersonation in which the subject, the actor and the performance become difficult to prise apart on screen.

Once you settle into your bewilderment, however, Barbara an oddly alluring film that does a double backflip on hokey showbiz-bio convention: »

- Guy Lodge

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'Barbara': Film Review | Cannes 2017

18 May 2017 3:05 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Actor-writer-director Mathieu Amalric and actor-singer Jeanne Balibar pay tribute to one of France’s most unusual and gifted mid-20th century chanteuses with Barbara. A self-eating snake of a movie about a director (Amalric) and a singer-actress (Balibar) trying themselves to make a movie about the French singer Barbara (who was born Monique Serf in 1930), this is a self-reflexive and sometimes screamingly self-indulgent work that’s strictly for hardcore French viewers and festivals. And yet, it still manages to be fitfully compelling, thanks especially to Balibar and the real Barbara, who died in 1997 but appears throughout via film clips and songs.

»

- Leslie Felperin

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Cannes Film Review: ‘Barbara’

18 May 2017 10:56 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

While her star continues to shine brightly in France 20 years after her death, the singer Barbara remains a lesser-known artist in other parts of Europe, not to mention on the other side of the pond. Presumably the producers of “Barbara” knew that and won’t be expecting brisk sales even with the opening slot in Cannes’ Un Certain Regard. Designed as a sort of meta-film in which Jeanne Balibar (refreshingly unaffected) is an actress playing Barbara in a film made by an obsessed director — Mathieu Amalric doing double duty as actor and director — the movie lightly plumbs that dangerously unsettled space between performing and literally being the protagonist in a biopic. “Barbara” is also a tribute to the singer’s prodigious talent and her undiminished emotional pull, but will struggle to find ticket buyers beyond her francophone fan base.

It’s hard to find a singer outside of France to »

- Jay Weissberg

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Cannes 2017. Past Upon Present—Arnaud Desplechin’s “Ismael’s Ghosts”

17 May 2017 4:08 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

If last year saw Olivier Assayas doing his version of a ghost story with Personal Shopper, this year, it apparently fell upon French contemporary Arnaud Desplechin to do the same with Ismael’s Ghosts, the (uncharacteristically) interesting opening film of the 70th Cannes Film Festival. Anyone expecting Desplechin to go full genre, though, will likely be disappointed, which is to say that Ismael’s Ghosts isn't much of a ghost story—or at least not any more of a ghost story than any of his other films, from his debut feature, the beautifully titled La vie des morts (1991), to his most recent, the coming-of-age drama My Golden Days (2015). What is a ghost story, after all, except the present being haunted by the past? Drawing from a vast array of references, Desplechin weaves together stories and fragments of stories that shift to and fro with wild abandon. Here, Ismaël Vuillard (a »

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Gathering lavender by Anne-Katrin Titze

17 May 2017 12:43 PM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Nicole Garcia on Marion Cotillard: "I find her very spontaneous and very unpredictable in this movie."

Tonight, Marion Cotillard is walking the Cannes Film Festival opening night red carpet for Arnaud Desplechin's Ismael’s Ghosts (Les Fantômes D'Ismaël), in which she stars with Charlotte Gainsbourg and Mathieu Amalric (who stars in his own film Barbara with Jeanne Balibar and Lisa Ray-Jacobs in the Directors' Fortnight program).

In my conversation with From The Land Of The Moon (Mal De Pierres) director Nicole Garcia she reveals how Marion Cotillard works on her character, explains the choices from costume designer Catherine Leterrier (Danièle Thompson's Cézanne Et Moi and Benoît Jacquot's 3 Coeurs), and shares the advice from Frantz director François Ozon on choosing a foreign language film title.

Nicole Garcia on the novel by Milena Agus: "I talked to Marion Cotillard about the book years ago." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

In »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Long and short of Cannes opener by Richard Mowe

17 May 2017 12:08 PM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Cannes opening film line-up (from left): Hippolyte Girardot, Mathieu Amalric, Marion Cotillard, Arnaud Desplechin, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Louis Garrel and Alba Rohrwacher in Ismael’s Ghosts, opening film at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Photo: Richard Mowe

The director of the Cannes Film Festival’s opening title Ismael’s Ghosts tried to explain away why there are two versions of the film on view - a short and long cut.

Arnaud Desplechin Photo: Richard Mowe

The Cannes first night audience saw the slim one: “There’s the original one, which is more intellectual,” said Desplechin at a media encounter. “And there’s the shorter one which you saw this morning which I would describe as more sentimental.” The extended cut currently is screening at the Pantheon Cinema in Paris, owned by Desplechin’s producer Pascal Caucheteux.

The American distributor Magnolia Pictures has yet to decide on which version to show in the States. »

- Richard Mowe

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Cannes Review: ‘Ismael’s Ghosts’ is a Disorienting, Exhilarating Drama

17 May 2017 8:52 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Pasolini included an “essential bibliography” in the opening credits of Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom, proffering five philosophical titles by the likes of Roland Barthes and Maurice Blanchot to help viewers navigate his rich and daunting Sadean masterpiece. The closing credits of Arnaud Desplechin’s Ismael’s Ghosts also feature a reading list that could be called essential. Of the four authors listed therein, one in particular might hold the key to interpreting Desplechin’s exhilarating, overflowing mindfuck of a movie: Jacques Lacan.

Desplechin has frequently acknowledged his debt to psychoanalysis in general and Lacan specifically, but never had he dared plunge as deeply into the mysteries of the psyche as he does here. The hyper-dense complexity of Ismael’s Ghosts may be his attempt at a cinematic representation of a nervous breakdown, namely that of the protagonist Ismael (Mathieu Amalric), a director who gets stuck at a creative »

- Giovanni Marchini Camia

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Cannes 2017: Will Smith Clashes With Pedro Almodóvar Over Netflix

17 May 2017 7:20 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Cannes got started with fireworks at the usually dull jury press conference after an underwhelming press screening for the opening film “Ismael’s Ghosts” from Arnaud Desplechin. (Read IndieWire’s review here.) Charlotte Gainsbourg and Marion Cotillard shine in the stylish French drama (which played out of competition), but their central relationship drama with an alcoholic filmmaker (Mathieu Amalric) is buried by overwrought theatrics.

Read More: The Cannes 2017 Buyers Guide: Who Will Buy Films You’ll See

Then the jury press conference exploded as jury president Pedro Almodóvar defended the experience of seeing movies on the big screen — all films should be seen first that way, he stated — and not on Netflix in people’s living rooms.

Was he actually saying he wouldn’t consider giving the Palme d’Or to the two Netflix competition films, Noah Baumbach’s “The Meyerowitz Stories” and Bong Joon Ho’s “Okja”?  And if so, »

- Anne Thompson

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Cannes 2017: Will Smith Clashes With Pedro Almodóvar Over Netflix

17 May 2017 7:20 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Cannes got started with fireworks at the usually dull jury press conference after an underwhelming press screening for the opening film “Ismael’s Ghosts” from Arnaud Desplechin. (Read IndieWire’s review here.) Charlotte Gainsbourg and Marion Cotillard shine in the stylish French drama (which played out of competition), but their central relationship drama with an alcoholic filmmaker (Mathieu Amalric) is buried by overwrought theatrics.

Read More: The Cannes 2017 Buyers Guide: Who Will Buy Films You’ll See

Then the jury press conference exploded as jury president Pedro Almodóvar defended the experience of seeing movies on the big screen — all films should be seen first that way, he stated — and not on Netflix in people’s living rooms.

Was he actually saying he wouldn’t consider giving the Palme d’Or to the two Netflix competition films, Noah Baumbach’s “The Meyerowitz Stories” and Bong Joon Ho’s “Okja”?  And if so, »

- Anne Thompson

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Arnaud Desplechin Responds to ‘Ismael’s Ghosts’ Alternate Cut Controversy: ‘There Aren’t Actually Two Films’

17 May 2017 5:45 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The way filmmaker Arnaud Desplechin explains it, his Cannes opening night offering “Ismael’s Ghosts” doesn’t have two different cuts, it simply has two different tones. 

At a press conference on Wednesday afternoon — held, as per tradition, after the press screening of the film, which will officially open the festival later tonight — Desplechin attempted to explain away rumors that the film bowing at the festival is not his preferred version, Variety reports.

Read More: The 2017 IndieWire Cannes Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted During the Festival

“This is an idea that dates from a long time ago,” Desplechin told the crowd. “It was a proposal by the producer. We were looking at the situation…There aren’t actually two films. There’s the original version and the one you saw. The original one is a more intellectual one. The version you saw is the more sentimental one. »

- Kate Erbland

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Ismael's Ghosts review – even Marion Cotillard can't save this silly, self-indulgent ragbag

17 May 2017 5:42 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Despite a classy cast, which includes Charlotte Gainsbourg and Mathieu Amalric alongside Cotillard, Arnaud Desplechin’s Cannes opener is a baffling mess

The Cannes film festival has begun with a twirl of pure time-wasting silliness from French film-maker and Cannes veteran Arnaud Desplechin. This is an unfinished doodle of a film, a madly self-indulgent jeu d’esprit without substance: a sketch, or jumble of sketches, a ragbag of half-cooked ideas for other movie projects, I suspect, that the director has attempt to salvage and jam together. It is admittedly leavened with the occasional shrug of humour or elegance or interesting moment of performance. But these stylish touches are in effect orphaned, presented to us without any satisfying cinematic or dramatic context. And the tonal switches between sophisticated comedy, mystery and finally tragedy – a final scene attempts an allusion to Cordelia and Lear – are frankly baffling and jarring.

Desplechin’s films »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Cannes Opening Night Film: Director Addresses Controversy About Two Cuts

17 May 2017 5:17 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Controversies over showing the director’s cut of a film is familiar turf at the Cannes Film Festival — remember Harvey Weinstein vs. “Grace of Monaco”?

But at the press conference on Wednesday afternoon for this year’s opening night selection, “Ismael's Ghosts,” director Arnaud Desplechin tried to downplay reports that his version isn’t premiering at the festival.

The extended cut of the film, which is 20 minutes longer, will only screen for now at Paris’ Cinema du Pantheon, owned by producer Pascal Caucheteux. Jean Labadie’s banner Le Pacte will release the version that’s showing in Cannes in French theaters. Magnolia Pictures, which is distributing the film in the United States, still hasn’t decided which version to show.

“This is an idea that dates from a long time ago,” Desplechin said. “It was a proposal by the producer. We were looking at the situation … There aren’t actually two films. »

- Ramin Setoodeh

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Cannes: Star-Studded Opening Night Celebrates 70th Anniversary

17 May 2017 3:19 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

The Cannes Film Festival kicked off its 70th edition on Wednesday night with a star-studded celebration hosted by master of ceremonies Monica Bellucci. 

As befitting the occasion, and the 70th anniversary, the A-list was out in force. Adrien Brody, Robin Wright, Julianne Moore, Susan Sarandon, Bella Hadid, Elle Fanning, Naomie Harris and Uma Thurman were among the celebrities gracing the red carpet, alongside Marion Cotillard, Charlotte Gainsbourg and Mathieu Amalric, the French headliners of the opening-night film, Arnaud Desplechin's Ismael's Ghosts.

But the fans crowding the streets across from the red carpet gave their biggest cheers for the members of this year's competition jury, including Pedro Almodovar (jury »

- Chris Gardner,Scott Roxborough

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Cannes Review: Marion Cotillard Won’t Stay Dead in Arnaud Desplechin’s Opening Night Film, ‘Ismael’s Ghosts’

17 May 2017 3:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Within its first half hour, “Ismael’s Ghosts” weaves together espionage, melodrama, supernatural hauntings, and a filmmaker’s creative crisis. It’s the most ambitious movie to date from French director Arnaud Desplechin, whose ensemble dramas “A Christmas Tale” and “My Golden Years” also dealt with characters coping with their troubled pasts. This time, it’s a wild hodgepodge of genres that often risk collapsing on top of each other. At its best, the movie is a freewheeling gambit, hurtling in multiple directions at once, and it’s thrilling to watch Desplechin try juggle them all.

“Ismael’s Ghosts” within the confines of a movie imagined by its main character: a dense, labyrinthine spy story involving the experiences of young recruit Ivan (Louie Garrel) who’s services straight out of school. Minutes into that setup, Desplechin pulls out to reveal the world of disheveled writer-director Ismael (Mathieu Amalric), a rugged, »

- Eric Kohn

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Cannes Film Review: ‘Ismael’s Ghosts’

17 May 2017 2:54 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

By far the most important ingredient for any artist is life experience: When storytellers try to tackle anything more realistic than a by-the-numbers superhero movie, it helps to have had your heart broken, perhaps to have lost a parent, to have been forced to choose between two lovers, to have fathered a child. With “Ismael’s Ghosts,” Arnaud Desplechin attempts to cram all this and more into a single film. A self-absorbed, nightmare-besotted director (played by Mathieu Amalric) is literally haunted by his past when his wife, presumed dead for 21 years, unexpectedly reappears midway through his latest production — but even though much seems to be informed by autobiography (or at least narcissism), precious little rings true.

As phony emotional showcases go, this one’s full of unintentionally comedic melodrama, rivaling cult favorite “The Room” at times as Amalric (reprising his role as the chronicallly unstable Ismael Vuillard from “Kings and »

- Peter Debruge

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 1997

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