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Five Foreign-Language Directors Who Have Been to Oscars Before

Five Foreign-Language Directors Who Have Been to Oscars Before
Variety approached five foreign-language directors who have been to the awards circuit before about the changes in their lives and their show business careers since their previous visit to the kudos rodeo whether it was five or 15 years earlier. For some technological advances were in the forefront while for others it was financing. We also asked them if they were interested in taking a path others had before them to Hollywood. The answers may surprise, or enlighten as each director has a unique take on new technology, recognition and of course the motivation and inspiration behind their current films.

Ruben Ostlund

There was a time in the Oscar foreign-language category’s not-too-distant history when the nominating committee fell for films about the sentimental bond between a grandfatherly old man and the bright-eyed boy he takes under his wing — feel-good films such as “Kolya” and “Cinema Paradiso.”

Ruben Ostlund’s “The Square” is not that movie. In fact, it
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The 20 Best Film Directors Who Came to TV in the 21st Century

The 20 Best Film Directors Who Came to TV in the 21st Century
While in recent years we’ve seen plenty of crossover between the film and television worlds, there have been a number of film directors whose engagement with this quasi-new medium has been truly groundbreaking, as they’ve found TV to be a far more creatively satisfying place than film. Thus, while they still may actively work in film from time to time, their TV efforts have proved unforgettable.

For the record, because we limited this to the 21st century, directors Nicole Holocenfer, Mimi Leder, David Lynch, and Tommy Schlamme were ineligible. But their accomplishments cannot be undersold.

Susanne Bier

Oscar winner Susanne Bier made her American television debut with the stylish and sexy John le Carré miniseries “The Night Manager.” Unlike Tomas Alfredson’s barren aesthetic for the Carré film “Tinker Tailor Solider Spy,” Bier opted instead to bring a golden-hued sensuality to nearly every frame of her Carré vision.
See full article at Indiewire Television »

The 20 Best Film Directors Who Came to TV in the 21st Century

  • Indiewire
The 20 Best Film Directors Who Came to TV in the 21st Century
While in recent years we’ve seen plenty of crossover between the film and television worlds, there have been a number of film directors whose engagement with this quasi-new medium has been truly groundbreaking, as they’ve found TV to be a far more creatively satisfying place than film. Thus, while they still may actively work in film from time to time, their TV efforts have proved unforgettable.

For the record, because we limited this to the 21st century, directors Nicole Holocenfer, Mimi Leder, David Lynch, and Tommy Schlamme were ineligible. But their accomplishments cannot be undersold.

Susanne Bier

Oscar winner Susanne Bier made her American television debut with the stylish and sexy John le Carré miniseries “The Night Manager.” Unlike Tomas Alfredson’s barren aesthetic for the Carré film “Tinker Tailor Solider Spy,” Bier opted instead to bring a golden-hued sensuality to nearly every frame of her Carré vision.
See full article at Indiewire »

Film Review: "The Snowman" (2017) Starring Michael Fassbender

  • CinemaRetro
By Mark Cerulli

Michael Fassbender plays a Norwegian detective with the high school bully magnet name of “Harry Hole” on the icy trail of a serial killer who always leaves a snowman at his crime scenes. Based on the, um, Hole literary series by Norwegian writer Jo NesbØ, the thriller also stars Rebecca Ferguson as a damaged policewoman trying to solve the crimes, Oscar-winner J.K. Simmons as a creepy industrialist and, curiously, Val Kilmer as an alcoholic detective who first opens up the case. (Kilmer’s rumored bout with cancer has sadly taken a toll as the actor looks nothing like the blonde Adonis he was in Top Gun and Batman Forever. It also sounded like he was dubbed throughout.) Although the Nordic scenery looks bleakly majestic due to Dion Beebe’s stunning cinematography and soaring helicopter shots, the plot twists and turns into a slushy mess.

Directed by Swedish filmmaker Tomas Alfredson (Tinker,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Your Alternative Halloween Viewing Guide: Hidden Horror Gems to Make Movie Night Frighteningly Fun

Your Alternative Halloween Viewing Guide: Hidden Horror Gems to Make Movie Night Frighteningly Fun
Every Halloween, when you want to check out a horror movie to get your heart racing, or a hilarious scary movie send-up to celebrate the holiday with laughs, everybody seems to cycle back to some of the same old classics.

While the slasher movies we've all come to know and love are classics for a reason (see: Halloween, I Know What You Did Last Summer or Scream), it’s fun to dive a little deeper into the realm of obscure horror, where some of the truly great fright flicks hide in the shadows.

Check out Et’s suggestions for some of the great lesser-known gems of spooky cinema with this year's alternative Halloween viewing guide:

Vampire Movies

Typical Fare: Bram Stoker's Dracula, The Lost Boys, From Dusk Till Dawn

Alternative Option: Let the Right One In

This thoughtful Swedish horror tale, directed by Tomas Alfredson, is an entirely unique take on the well-trod territory of vampire
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

13 horror films for people who hate horror films

Chris Thomson Oct 29, 2017

Have a collection of horror films that are great, but might still let you sort-of-sleep at night...

It’s fair to say that not everyone gets along with horror films. For every horror aficionado who revels in being scared witless or seeing a hapless victim have their insides rehomed, there are plenty who would rather chew gravel than spend two hours in the company of their worst fears and nightmares.

Somewhere in between is a bizarre middle ground (which is where I sit) of those intrigued by the thought of horror films, but in practice spend half the film ingesting their own fingernails or testing the structural integrity of the arm rests.

If you’re not a huge fan of horror but still fancy dipping your toe in the water, here are 13 horror films perfect for those who don’t like horror films...

Get Out

Make no mistake,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Gary Oldman to Receive Variety Award at British Independent Film Awards

Gary Oldman to Receive Variety Award at British Independent Film Awards
Gary Oldman is to receive this year’s Variety Award at the British Independent Film Awards on Dec. 10. The award recognizes a director, actor, writer or producer who has made a global impact and helped to focus the international spotlight on the U.K.

Previous recipients of the award include Benedict Cumberbatch, Jude Law, Kenneth Branagh, Keira Knightley, Liam Neeson, Paul Greengrass, Daniel Craig, Helen Mirren, Kate Winslet and Naomie Harris, who was last year’s honoree.

Steven Gaydos, Variety’s Vice President and Executive Editor, said: “In the 30 years since Gary Oldman galvanized global film audiences with his portrayal of punk rocker Sid Vicious in ‘Sid and Nancy,’ Oldman has blazed a path as one of international cinema’s most versatile and valued actors. From blockbusters to American indie classics and U.K. masterworks, Oldman has been a force of nature who’s brought life to a stunning variety of characters across all genres of film
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Michael Fassbender: After a Year of Flops, Here’s How He Can Recover from ‘The Snowman’

Michael Fassbender: After a Year of Flops, Here’s How He Can Recover from ‘The Snowman’
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors and those who hope to get there. In this edition, we take on Michael Fassbender.

Bottom Line: Fassbender is an asset in any ensemble, from the “X-Men” franchise to “Inglourious Basterds.” Those franchises inflate his bankability in foreign territories, and he’s had two Oscar nominations, but he lacks marquee value. He was the biggest star in well-reviewed $97-million sequel “Alien: Covenant” (Metacritic: 65), which scored just $240 million worldwide, down dramatically from the $430 million earned by its predecessor, “Prometheus.” Screenwriter Aaron Sorkin didn’t even know who Fassbender was when his name came up to play the lead in hot project “Steve Jobs” (Metacritic: 82); and sure enough, even with a full-tilt Oscar push that brought him his first Best Actor nomination, the $30-million movie tanked with just $34 million worldwide. Fassbender tends to be cast as troubled antiheroes (Magneto, Macbeth,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Michael Fassbender: After a Year of Flops, Here’s How He Can Recover from ‘The Snowman’

Michael Fassbender: After a Year of Flops, Here’s How He Can Recover from ‘The Snowman’
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors and those who hope to get there. In this edition, we take on Michael Fassbender.

Bottom Line: Fassbender is an asset in any ensemble, from the “X-Men” franchise to “Inglourious Basterds.” Those franchises inflate his bankability in foreign territories, and he’s had two Oscar nominations, but he lacks marquee value. He was the biggest star in well-reviewed $97-million sequel “Alien: Covenant” (Metacritic: 65), which scored just $240 million worldwide, down dramatically from the $430 million earned by its predecessor, “Prometheus.” Screenwriter Aaron Sorkin didn’t even know who Fassbender was when his name came up to play the lead in hot project “Steve Jobs” (Metacritic: 82); and sure enough, even with a full-tilt Oscar push that brought him his first Best Actor nomination, the $30-million movie tanked with just $34 million worldwide. Fassbender tends to be cast as troubled antiheroes (Magneto, Macbeth,
See full article at Indiewire »

Geostorm: back to the 90s with Dean Devlin’s Armageddon 2

Ed Kegenof Oct 24, 2017

It’s the end of the world yet again in the sci-fi disaster thriller, Geostorm. An unofficial sequel to Michael Bay’s Armageddon...?

With Independence Day, director Roland Emmerich and producer Dean Devlin managed to single-handedly resuscitate the disaster movie - a genre that had wheezed to a halt following an increasingly daft sequence of examples in the late 70s and early 80s (for a stunning night in, check out the low-rent majesty of Meteor, The Swarm or When Time Ran Out). Sure, Independence Day was an alien invasion movie straight out of the 50s, but its scenes of global panic and destruction were pure Irwin Allen. A certified hit in 1996, Independence Day sparked a wave of incendiary movies in the same vein, with scenarios varying from exploding volcanoes (Dante’s Peak and, well, Volcano), a giant monster (Godzilla) and duelling asteroid movies Deep Impact and Armageddon.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Film Review: Stellar Cast & Director Fail to Build ‘The Snowman’

Chicago – The biggest mystery in “The Snowman” is what in the world talented actors like Michael Fassbender, Chloe Sevigny, Toby Jones, and Val Kilmer are doing here in the first place. Fassbender’s character’s name alone should have sent off alarm bells. This is based on a series of detective novels featuring detective Harry Hole, and characters have voluminous opportunities to repeat it, although with nary a snigger.

Rating: 1.0/5.0

Hole (giggle) is on the trail of a serial killer who strikes at first snowfall and makes a habit of dismembering his victims and turning them into Snowmen. It’s not that disposable pop pulp like this can’t be well made, it’s that it’s rare to see such a cornucopia of awfulness all in one place. Fassbender’s detective is supposed to be one of those brilliant alcoholic legends, but we aren’t treated to much in the way of brilliance.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Cinemaholics #37: Only The Brave Review

This week, the Cinemaholics saw Only the Brave and they’re more than ready to talk about the movie, which is based on true events surrounding the Granite Mountain Hotshots. Starring Josh Brolin, Miles Teller, Jeff Bridges and Jennifer Connelly, this is a biographical drama full of some big surprises, and we definitely recommend that you see it before digging into the real story.

Elsewhere on the show, Jon, Will and Maveryke also talk about The Snowman, starring Michael Fassbender and Rebecca Ferguson and directed by Tomas Alfredson. Based on the seventh novel of a series of detective stories by Jo Nesbø, The Snowman hasn’t exactly taken the critics or audiences by storm (and don’t get us started on Geostorm), so sit back and hear Will’s thoughts on how the David Fincher knockoff plays out.

Following that, Jon and Maveryke rave about Fincher’s work in Mindhunter Season 1, now on Netflix,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

‘Only the Brave’ and 2 More Bomb, Tyler Perry’s ‘Boo 2’ Will Break Even: It’s Another Troubling Box-Office Weekend

  • Indiewire
‘Only the Brave’ and 2 More Bomb, Tyler Perry’s ‘Boo 2’ Will Break Even: It’s Another Troubling Box-Office Weekend
Geostorm,” “Only the Brave,” “The Snowman” — it’s another in a series of terrible box-office weekends. Last year, the same weekend saw three new releases gross a total of $65 million; this year, four new releases totaled $44 million. “Boo 2: A Madea Halloween” performed best, but at the lower end of expectations.

This is a performance that might be expected in January, the dumping ground for loser films. But October is the month where we’ve seen films like “Gravity,” “Gone Girl,” and “The Martian” thrive.

Is it a crisis yet? It’s clear there’s still an audience when a September release like “It” can hit $320 million domestic so far. However, it’s clear that even franchise fans are unreliable.

Read More:‘Geostorm’ Review: Brace for Category 5 CGI Boredom

With a $22 million opening weekend and a $25 million budget, “Boo 2!” could break even: Figure less than $30 million in marketing/distribution costs,
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: "The Snowman"

by Eric Blume

There aren’t words in the English language which can adequately describe how terrible The Snowman is. Talented director Tomas Alfredson (Let the Right One In and Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy) has let the press know that “10-15% of the screenplay” was never shot during principal photography, which certainly explains why nothing in the movie makes a shred of sense.

The film might be about a detective (Michael Fassbender) who is partnering but not partnering with another detective (Rebecca Ferguson) to track someone who may or may not be a serial killer, the identity of whom may or may not be traced back to a prologue which is undeniably heavy-handed and portentous...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Box Office: Tyler Perry’s ‘Boo 2!’ Set to Top Sluggish Weekend Ahead of ‘Geostorm’

Box Office: Tyler Perry’s ‘Boo 2!’ Set to Top Sluggish Weekend Ahead of ‘Geostorm’
Tyler Perry’s most recent installment in the “Madea” franchise, “Boo 2! A Madea Halloween,” is likely to dominate one of the most torpid October weekends yet with $21 million at 2,388 North American locations — nearly double the next highest projected intake from “Geostorm.”

“Boo 2,” from Lionsgate, received an A- CinemaScore and should bring in about 30% less than the original “Boo! A Madea Halloween,” which won its opening weekend easily over “Jack Reacher: Never Go Back” with $28.5 million and finished with $73 million domestically. The sequel, set at a haunted campground, is directed and written by Perry, who also stars in his ninth iteration as the tough-talking Madea.

“Boo 2” is a fairly low-risk project for Lionsgate, with a combined production and marketing budget in the $20 million range. Lionsgate is likely to dominate the box office next weekend during the pre-Halloween period with the opening of “Jigsaw,” its eighth movie in the “Saw” franchise, and the second weekend of “Boo 2.”

Geostorm,” a weather
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Second Opinion – The Snowman (2017)

The Snowman, 2017.

Directed by Tomas Alfredson

Starring Michael Fassbender, Rebecca Ferguson, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Jonas Karlsson, Toby Jones, Val Kilmer and J.K. Simmons

Synopsis:

Detective Harry Hole investigates the disappearance of a woman whose pink scarf is found wrapped around an ominous-looking snowman.

For the third time this year, Michael Fassbender has delivered a decent performance in a film well below his talents. Following Assassin’s Creed and Alien: Covenant I had high hopes that this tremendous actor would be given some meaty material. Unfortunately The Snowman has too much going on for its own good.

Fassbender plays Detective Harry Hole, a drunk and slightly passed it policeman who is drawn into a game of cat and mouse with the titular killer who leaves snowmen at the scene of his crimes. So far so good. Unfortunately the audience are then treated to multiple smaller stories that detract from the case and
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Review: The Snowman (2017)

Ever looked at something and thought where did it all go wrong? Sometimes a movie has everything going for it, a great concept, a great cast, a great crew and some stunning ideas and then it just flat out does not work. Remember Hancock and how it derailed? Or Neveldine/Taylor’s Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance? Well, I’m sad to report that director Tomas Alfredson’s (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, Let The Right One In) adaptation of Jo Nesbø’s novel The Snowman is a real disappointment to fans of the book and newcomers alike.

From the bleak first scene to the impressive who’s who opening credits backed by Marco Beltrami’s unnerving scoring (which practically melts away into unremarkable territory after this point), this is a film that looks like it could have that lingering Scandinavian Drama/Thriller inspired chill and a real horrific thrill. A
See full article at The Cultural Post »

Box Office: ‘Boo 2! A Madea Halloween’ to Blow Away ‘Geostorm’ in Slow Weekend

Box Office: ‘Boo 2! A Madea Halloween’ to Blow Away ‘Geostorm’ in Slow Weekend
Tyler Perry’s horror-comedy sequel “Boo 2! A Madea Halloween” is providing the only bright spot on a downbeat weekend with about $23 million at 2,388 North American locations, early estimates showed Friday.

Four other new films are showing little traction among moviegoers. The most prominent is costly weather disaster drama “Geostorm,” which is heading for a financial disaster with an opening weekend of $13 million at 3,246 venues for Warner Bros. The studio — which had forecasted a finish in the $10 million to $12 million range — took the unusual step of not holding Thursday night previews, as it had not held screenings for critics.

Sony’s opening of firefighting drama “Only the Brave” is heading for about $6 million at 2,575 locations — a disappointing result, given its $38 million budget. Universal’s murder mystery “The Snowman” is faring even worse with about $5 million at 1,813 North American theaters, well below muted estimates in the $8 million to $12 million range. And Pure Flix’s faith-based “Same Kind of Different as Me” is underperforming
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'The Snowman': What the Critics Are Saying

'The Snowman': What the Critics Are Saying
The reviews for Michael Fassbender starrer The Snowman are in, and the general takeaway is that the film, based on Jo Nesbo's 2007 best-seller, falls flat. The Universal and Working Title film, from Swedish director Tomas Alfredson (Let the Right One In, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy) and executive producer Martin Scorsese, follows a detective (Fassbender) who teams up with a new recruit (Rebecca Ferguson) to track down a serial killer who builds a snowman each time he strikes.

The Hollywood Reporter's Stephen Dalton calls the film, which released on Friday, "cold and lifeless" in his review: "For all its...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

The Snowman Director Knows Why His Movie Sucks

The Snowman Director Knows Why His Movie Sucks
One would have thought that a movie produced by Martin Scorsese, directed by the guy who made Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, with a cast that includes Michael Fassbender and Rebecca Ferguson, would have turned out to be one of the better movies of the fall season. That's not the case. The Snowman, by most accounts, is a complete disaster. Director Tomas Alfredson is already going on the defensive, doing his best to explain why this dumpster fire isn't his fault. Here's what he had to say about it in a recent interview.

"Our shoot time in Norway was way too short. We didn't get the whole story with us and when we started cutting we discovered that a lot was missing. It's like when you're making a big jigsaw puzzle and a few pieces are missing so you don't see the whole picture."

According to Tomas Alfredson, "It happened very abruptly,
See full article at MovieWeb »
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