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NYC Weekend Watch: Jack Fisk, Jean Eustache, ‘A Brighter Summer Day,’ Arnaud Desplechin & More

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of the Moving Image

“See It Big! Jack Fisk” celebrates one of cinema’s greatest production designers. The first weekend brings four Malick features, Mulholland Dr., Carrie, and There Will Be Blood.

A collection of the Muppets‘ appearances on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson will be presented this Sunday.

Metrograph

A retrospective of the
See full article at The Film Stage »

Joshua Reviews Charlie Ahearn’s Jamel Shabazz Street Photographer [DVD Review]

To most people, the name Charlie Ahearn doesn’t ring a bell. A relatively unsung filmmaker born and bred in New York City, Ahearn has only four directing credits to his name, spread out over a nearly 40 year career as director. However, few directors are as important to popular culture and particularly the spread of hip-hop culture as this bewilderingly influential filmmaker and cultural artist.

With the groundbreaking Wild Style, Ahearn would make what has become known as cinema’s first true hip-hop film. With names like Fab Five Freddy, Rock Steady crew and Grandmaster Flash as part of the cast, the film would mainly focus on a graffiti artist named Zoro, as he makes his way through the urban landscape that sparked the early moments of hip-hop culture. With that culture now becoming arguably the driving force in mainstream popular culture, Ahearn is a truly influential force. And thankfully,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Oscilloscope Honors City Life with 'Jamel Shabazz Street Photographer' and 'Stations of the Elevated' DVD Releases

Oscilloscope Honors City Life with 'Jamel Shabazz Street Photographer' and 'Stations of the Elevated' DVD Releases
Read More: 9 Hip Hop-Inspired Films to Get You Ready For 'Dope'  "Jamel Shabazz Street Photographer" and "Stations of the Elevated," two films with a strong connection to the city and the music that it helps create, are slated for DVD releases this fall through Oscilloscope.  Charlie Ahearn, director of the hip-hop film "Wild Style," brings new attention to Jamel Shabazz and his art with "Jamel Shabazz Street Photographer," painting a vivid picture of the man whose photography helped to define a generation of African American street culture. "Jamel" will be released digitally October 6 and as a limited edition DVD on October 27.  "Stations of the Elevated," a jazzy city symphony shot on 16mm and directed by Manfred Kirchheimer, features iconic images of urban landscapes and the vibrant graffiti that drapes its surface. "Stations" will be released digitally October 20 and will be made available...
See full article at Indiewire »

Afs Doc Nights Preview: 'Jamel Shabazz Street Photographer'

Street-style photography seems almost pedestrian now, with blogs like The Sartorialist, Humans of New York or (my favorite) What Ali Wore popping up every day, but this wasn't the case when photographer Jamel Shabazz started snapping pics in the '70s.  A friend of the artist says he was "capturing life in its purest form."

Shabazz depicted the history of his NYC borough, documenting the early days of hip-hop culture, the fashion and lifestyle he saw day-to-day in the subway or walking the streets of Brooklyn. 

Jamel Shabazz Street Photographer (2013) delves into the photographer's influential work and follows some of his current-day activities. Director Charlie Ahearn's previous work includes 1983's Wild Style, a hip hop docudrama. In this film, Ahearn includes interviews with cultural figures such as Fab 5 Freddy and Krs-One among others.

Austin Film Society will show the Shabazz documentary this Sunday, Jan. 12 at 4pm [tickets] at Afs at the Marchesa.
See full article at Slackerwood »

Remastered 30th Anniversary Edition Of Hip-Hop Classic 'Wild Style' Now Out On DVD

In a world a long, long ago, there was Wild Style, the film that can be legitimately called the first hip-hop film ever made.The low budget musical docu-drama, directed by Charlie Ahearn, revolves around the life of a New York City graffiti artist, played by real-life graffiti artist Lee Quinones, as he deals with his life, his work and his relationship with a fellow artist Rose (Sandra Fabara). It features performances by hip-hop luminaries of the day like Grandmaster Flash, Fab Five Freddy, Rock Steady Crew and Cold Crush Brothers, and can rightly claim to be one of the very few films ever made that had a ground-breaking cultural impact.The film’s success led to...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Giveaway: Wild Style 30th Anniversary Collector's Edition DVD Sets

No history of hip-hop is complete without mention of Wild Style, which marks its 30th Anniversary via a two-disc deluxe DVD release from Music Box Films. The film combines break dancing, the tagging of Lee Quinones, and the musical exploits of Grandmaster Flash, Fab Five Freddy, Rock Steady Crew and the Cold Crush Brothers. Besides a complete remastering, the set is packed with extras, as well as a 48-page booklet written by director Charlie Ahearn. [Editor's note: the audio commentary by Ahearn and Fab Five Freddy is enlightening and essential.]Because this film is so important, the challenge will be more difficult than usual.Shoot me a short  (1-2 minute tops but no minimum length) hip hop vid explaining why you deserve a copy of this monumental movie. 1....

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Patti Astor, Eighties Art-Scene Icon And Wild Style Star, Still Has Fun

  • Vulture
“Here it is,” Patti Astor shrieks. “Here’s my little gallery!” Astor is standing outside a tiny basement storefront at 225 East 11th Street in New York City's East Village, where she and partner Bill Stelling opened the original Fun Gallery in 1981. That was the year after she starred in Eric Mitchell’s landmark low-budget flick Underground U.S.A. and a couple years before her turn as a reporter in Wild Style, Charlie Ahearn’s celebration of early B-boy culture that features the graffiti artists Lee Quinones and Lady Pink Fabara, as well as hip-hop pioneer Fab 5 Freddy, Astor's then-boyfriend and a future host of Yo! MTV Raps.If you've never heard of Patti Astor, it may be because she’s one of those people who should take credit for things but doesn’t. Back in the day, she was more interested in making sure the young artists she championed — graffiti masters like Dondi,
See full article at Vulture »

Remastered 30th Anniversary Edition Of Hip-Hop Classic 'Wild Style' In Theaters Tomorrow

In a world a long, long ago, there was Wild Style, the film that can be legitimately called the first hip-hop film ever made.The low budget musical docu-drama, directed by Charlie Ahearn, revolves around the life of a New York City graffiti artist, played by real-life graffiti artist Lee Quinones, as he deals with his life, his work and his relationship with a fellow artist Rose (Sandra Fabara). It features performances by hip-hop luminaries of the day like Grandmaster Flash, Fab Five Freddy, Rock Steady Crew and Cold Crush Brothers, and can rightly claim to be one of the very few films ever made that had a ground-breaking cultural impact.The film’s success led to...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

A Time Capsule, Ahead of its Time, of 1983 Bronx Graffiti Culture in Wild Style

A Time Capsule, Ahead of its Time, of 1983 Bronx Graffiti Culture in Wild Style
At a moment when documentaries often feel compelled to blur the reality/fiction border for the sake of entertainment, something refreshing can be found in the inverse: a narrative feature that inadvertently lapses into a de facto doc. Such is true of Wild Style, Charlie Ahearn's 30-year-old time capsule of the hip-hop community in the early '80s Bronx. Zoro (Lee Quinones) is a young graffiti artist who's constantly at work tagging his environs; he's kept busy by avoiding cops, trying to win back his ex (Sandra Fabara) from a rival artist, and organizing a hip-hop concert. Plenty of significant themes are explored—the act of making graffiti as a reclamation of one's space, the co-opting of countercultural work by mainstream taste (in one memorable sequence, Zoro is brought ...
See full article at Village Voice »

Jamel Shabazz Street Photographer Is a Portrait of Portraiture

In 2001, street photographer Jamel Shabazz released Back in the Days, a volume of his collected works and a rare portrait of hip-hop's infancy. The book, which gathers hundreds of photographs captured on the streets of Harlem and beyond between 1980 and 1989, represents an authentic chronicle of the people, fashions, and poses that embodied a lifestyle, articulating a rich history of urban style. Charlie Ahearn's new documentary, Jamel Shabazz Street Photographer, tells the story of how Back in the Days came to be, and so, in a sense, is a portrait of portraiture. But Ahearn works at a distinct disadvantage: Present to document the book's reception rather than its genesis, he has no direct access to the vibrant past about which his subjects reminisce, leaving him t...
See full article at Village Voice »

'Jamel Shabazz Street Photographer' Gets 1-Week Theatrical (A Tribute To A Man & His Camera)

Glad to know that this project, which we last wrote about in mid-2011, is finally getting a theatrical release! Charlie Ahearn's documentary on the work, life and times of photographer/"urban life" documenter, Jamel Shabazz, titled Jamel Shabazz Street Photographer, will see a 1-week theatrical run at BAMCinématek in Brooklyn, New York, courtesy of Apd’s Cinema Conservancy program. Playdates are also expected for Chicago, Portland, Seattle & San Francisco. In the infancy of hip-hop, Brooklyn-born photographer Jamel Shabazz documented the pioneers of music and style that would launch a worldwide phenomenon. Charlie Ahearn, director of the...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Contest: Win A 'Blank City' Poster Signed By Steve Buscemi, Thurston Moore, Jim Jarmusch & More Plus DVD/BluRay Prizes

While always a city bursting with creative and artistic talent, there was probably no time more fertile in New York City than than '70s and '80s. Avant-garde art, hip hop, punk, no-wave, disco and more all clashed and mingled, leaving a lasting impression on pop culture, politics and the city itself. Among that noise and ruckus, independent filmmakers were also making a big wave, capturing New York's vibrancy in stories that inspired a new generation of directors. And that time has been captured in the documentary "Blank City."

Directed by Celine Danhier, the film explores the artists of the "No Wave Cinema" and "Cinema of Transgression" movements who shattered existing notions of Diy and underground art, and paved the way for today's independent film scene. Through interviews with Steve Buscemi, Debbie Harry, Jim Jarmusch, Fab 5 Freddy and John Waters and many more, the film presents a revealing
See full article at The Playlist »

BAMcinemaFEST 2011

Updated through 6/26.

"The golden age of New York moviegoing is now," argues Ao Scott in the New York Times. "Two events in the coming days offer confirmation of this hunch." Tonight "in Brooklyn the BAMcinemaFest opens with Weekend, Andrew Haigh's bracing, present-tense exploration of sex, intimacy and love, the first of 26 features that will play, along with 24 short films, over the next 10 days. And Friday is the official opening night of the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, a charming two-screen jewel box carved (by the architect David Rockwell) out of garage and office space at Lincoln Center." He touches on the Museum of the Moving Image and the reRun Gastropub Theater as well, before returning to BAMcinemaFEST: "Not everything in the lineup is quite so perfectly realized as Weekend, but the range and generosity of the sampling make it hard to go wrong. Even the misfires and train wrecks are interesting,
See full article at MUBI »

"Weekend" and "Tournée" Bookend 3rd Annual BAMcinemaFest

BAMcinématek has released the lineup for the third annual BAMcinemaFest. The festival will open with the New York premiere of Andrew Haigh’s "Weekend" and close with the New York premiere of Mathieu Amalric’s "Tournée." Additional highlights include 17 more New York premieres, the world premiere of Charlie Ahearn’s "Jamel Shabazz Street Photographer" and a new 35mm print of Bryan Forbes’ "Whistle Down the Wind." The festival runs Jun 16-26 in ...
See full article at Indiewire »

"Blank City," Reviewed

  • IFC
Although it's an unfortunate turn of phrase given the era, the best way to describe the documentary "Blank City" is still as something of a gateway drug when it comes to the late '70s, early '80s underground film scene in New York. It's easy to tell this since it's obvious French director Celine Danhier recreates her own experience of discovering the no-budget avant garde movement known as "No Wave" cinema in her documentary, presenting one snippet of rare footage after another, teasing the audience with clips of Michael Holman's self-descriptive "Vincent Gallo as Flying Christ" and Charlie Ahearn's groundbreaking hip-hop flick "Wild Style" and having such personalities as Deborah Harry and Steve Buscemi talk about what a wild and crazy time it was.

It's the shortcoming of "Blank City" that it isn't as adventurous in mirroring the era the film documents, settling into a style where
See full article at IFC »

New York African Film Festival Begins Today With An Impressive Lineup! Have You Bought Your Tickets Yet?

The New York African Film Festival begins Today New Yorkers, and the 2011 lineup is an impressive one!

Of note, several films that have been touted on this website (old and new) are scheduled to screen at this year’s festival, including, Andrew Dosunmu’s feature film directorial debut and Sundance 2011 entry, Restless City, in what I believe will be the film’s New York city premiere! I saw the film in January, and found it enchanting. You can read my full review of it Here.

Also, Congolese filmmaker Djo Tunda Wa Munga’s explosive Viva Riva!, which premiered at the Toronto Film Festival last fall, and swept the African Movie Academy Awards; a film that’s being referred to as “Congolese Avant-Garde.” I saw it a couple of weeks ago, and dug it! Read me review Here.

New Yorkers will also get to see Besouro (a Shadow And Act Film
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

New York African Film Festival Begins Tomorrow! “Restless City,” “Viva Riva,” Focus Features Africa First Shorts + More!

The New York African Film Festival begins tomorrow New Yorkers, and the 2011 lineup is an impressive one!

Of note, several films that have been touted on this website (old and new) are scheduled to screen at this year’s festival, including, Andrew Dosunmu’s feature film directorial debut and Sundance 2011 entry, Restless City, in what I believe will be the film’s New York city premiere! I saw the film in January, and found it enchanting. You can read my full review of it Here.

Also, Congolese filmmaker Djo Tunda Wa Munga’s explosive Viva Riva!, which premiered at the Toronto Film Festival last fall, and swept the African Movie Academy Awards; a film that’s being referred to as “Congolese Avant-Garde.” I saw it a couple of weeks ago, and dug it! Read me review Here.

New Yorkers will also get to see Besouro (a Shadow And Act Film
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Filling in the “Blank City”

  • Fangoria
Filling in the “Blank City”
Compared to today, you wouldn’t recognize New York City in the ’70s. Back then, drugs, poverty and urban decay ruled the streets, especially in the economically depressed Lower East Side. This gritty environment gave birth to an underground group of experimental filmmakers, including Jim Jarmusch, Richard Kern, Charlie Ahearn and Nick Zed, whose bizarre Geek Maggot Bingo (top) featured former Fango editor Bob Martin. These transgressive films, dubbed No Wave, took no prisoners just from some of their titles alone (Go To Hell, Submit To Me Now, They Eat Scum, etc.) and soon began gathering a cult following in grungy dive theaters and through VHS bootlegs. This Cinema of Transgression is celebrated in filmmaker Celine Danhier’s exhaustive and fascinating documentary Blank City (opening April 6 at NYC’s IFC Center from Insurgent Media), which offers revealing interviews with Jarmusch, Kern, Zedd, actor Steve Buscemi (who made his acting debut
See full article at Fangoria »

New York African Film Festival Announces 2011 Lineup (“Restless City,” “Viva Riva” Make The Cut)

The New York African Film Festival has announced its 2011 lineup, and it’s an impressive one! I’m excited, and hopefully you will be too, especially if you live in New York.

Of note, several films that have been touted on this website (old and new) are scheduled to screen at this year’s festival, including, Andrew Dosunmu’s feature film directorial debut and Sundance 2011 entry, Restless City, in what I believe will be the film’s New York city premiere! I saw the film at Sundance in January, and found it enchanting. You can read my full review of it Here.

Also, Congolese filmmaker Djo Tunda Wa Munga’s Viva Riva!, which screened at the Toronto Film Festival last fall, and Fespaco last month, where it won some awards; a film that’s being referred to as “Congolese Avant-Garde.” I haven’t seen it, but I’m really looking forward to doing so.
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Q&A: Blank City

The Q and A after Saturday night's world premiere of Blank City turned into a veritable roll call of artists and icons from the No Wave and Cinema of Transgression film movements that began in late-'70s New York. Director Celine Danhier was joined by producer Aviva Wishnow and executive producers Dan Braun and Josh Braun at the front of the theater as they introduced many of the documentary's interview subjects who were in the crowd, among them Nick Zedd, Amos Poe, Richard Kern, Sara Driver, Charlie Ahearn, Patti Astor, and Pat Place. Once we finished craning our necks to see all the cult celebs in the crowd, the big question on everyone's mind was, 'Where can we watch all the films talked about in Blank City?' 'Good question. Next question,' joked Dan Braun. 'We hope that [Blank City] will generate interest for a lot of these films in some form.
See full article at Tribeca Film »
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