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Peter Debruge’s 10 Best Films of 2017

Peter Debruge’s 10 Best Films of 2017
2017 was the year of fanboys and wonder women, as the former grew almost deafening in their zeal (permitting no dissent on the unquestioned genius of the DC, Marvel, Star Wars and Apes franchises, even when the movies themselves disappointed), while the latter found a common voice and courageous platform to take on the honchos in showbiz, politics and many other fields who had the nerve to ignore that famous superhero adage, “With great power comes great responsibility.”

“The Reckoning” (my nickname for this essential, long-overdue upheaval) has finally brought accountability for the kind of sexual harassment and all-around misbehavior no one should have to face in the workplace, toppling some of the biggest titans of our industry in the process. My heart broke when I read the words of ex-Weinstein employee Lauren O’Connor’s internal memo: “The balance of power is me: 0, Harvey Weinstein: 10.” But the movies have long given us a model for optimism
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Robin Campillo’s ‘Bpm (Beats Per Minute)’ Leads France’s 2017 Lumieres Nominations

Robin Campillo’s ‘Bpm (Beats Per Minute)’ Leads France’s 2017 Lumieres Nominations
Robin Campillo’s “Bpm (Beats Per Minute),” the French foreign-language Oscar candidate, is leading nominations at the Lumieres Awards, France’s equivalent of the Golden Globes.

“Bpm,” a sprawling and intense drama following French AIDS activists in 1980s Paris, will compete in six categories, including best film, director, actor (Nahuel Pérez Biscayart), male newcomer (Arnaud Valois), script (Campillo and Philippe Mangeot) and score (Arnaud Rebotini). Since winning Cannes Film Festival’s Grand Jury Prize, “Bpm” has nabbed several prizes overseas, notably the New York, Los Angeles and Washington critics’ awards for best foreign-language film, as well as prizes at Chicago and San Sebastian film festivals.

Mathieu Amalric’s “Barbara,” which world premiered at Cannes’ Un Certain Regard, and Eric Toledano and Olivier Nakache’s contemporary dramedy “C’est La Vie” each garnered four Lumieres nominations, while Albert Dupontel’s “Au revoir là-haut” and Alain Gomis’s “Felicité,” winner of Berlin’s Silver Bear, will each compete
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Lost in Paris review – Emmanuelle Riva beguiles in this funny little gem

French screen icon joins writer-directors Dominique Abel and Fiona Gordon for one of her final appearances

Here is one of the final screen appearances of Emmanuelle Riva, icon of movies from Michael Haneke’s Amour to Gillo Pontecorvo’s Kapò and Alain Resnais’s Hiroshima Mon Amour, who died in January at the age of 89. It is a delectably gentle, elegant, self-effacing performance. Riva plays a lovably scatty old lady called Marthe in this Tati-esque comedy from French writer-directors Dominique Abel and Fiona Gordon. The movie they have jointly devised, and in which they star, is a clever, funny and distinctly unworldly comedy with an insouciant line in visual humour.

Fiona (Fiona Gordon) is a young goof from Canada who comes to Paris to visit her similarly away-with-the-fairies aunt Marthe (Riva). A mishap on the banks of, and then in, the Seine leads to an encounter with a romantic tramp
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

New to Streaming: ‘The Big Sick,’ ‘Paris Can Wait,’ ‘Harmonium,’ ‘Lost in Paris,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

The Big Sick (Michael Showalter)

From start to finish, The Big Sick, directed by Michael Showalter, works as a lovingly-rendered, cinematic answer to the dinner party question: “So how did you two meet?” Based on comedian Kumail Nanjiani‘s real life (he co-wrote the screenplay with his wife Emily V. Gordon), we meet Kumail (Nanjiani) as he finishes a stand-up set in Chicago. He becomes fast friends with a
See full article at The Film Stage »

Karlovy Vary International Film Festival Celebrates Critics Choice Movies

Variety Critics Choice celebrates its 20th anniversary as a key Karlovy Vary International Film Festival section.

Animals

Switzerland-Austria-Poland

If you can’t trust the talking cat, whom do you trust? Such are brain-frying quandaries viewers may face deep into the darkness of this deliciously unhinged, blood-laced adult fairy tale from Swiss-Polish writer-director Greg Zglinski. Setting out with real-world levels of macabre nastiness as it wittily probes the marital faultlines between a bourgeois Viennese couple attempting a restorative Alpine getaway, the film takes a smooth, almost imperceptible left turn into David Lynch-worthy realms of illogic that will leave adventurous audiences both rapt and dazed, dreamily uncertain of where exactly they lost the plot. Unraveling this cat’s-cradle isn’t half as important or pleasurable as getting entangled in it to begin with. Zglinski’s espresso-dark humor and icy formal precision may nod to a host of expert cinematic mind-gamers, from Roman Polanski to Lars von Trier, but “Animals” gleefully cultivates its very own kind of crazy.

Guy Lodge

Columbus

U.S.

There’s an old saying, often attributed to Martin Mull: “Writing about music is like dancing about architecture.” In many ways first-time writer-director Kogonada’s “Columbus” treats architecture like music, as its protagonists write, talk, bicker and dance about an extraordinary collection of modernist structures in the unassuming Midwest town of Columbus, Ind. The hypnotically paced drama carried by the serendipitous odd-couple pairing of John Cho and Haley Lu Richardson is lovely and tender, marking the mono-monikered Kogonada as an auteur to watch. The relationships between each of the characters are imbued with warmth and humanity, and the filmmaking — like the city’s structures designed by the likes of Eero Saarinen and I.M. Pei — are gorgeous. In this unconventional American film, Kogonada is less interested in romance than in the characters’ overlapping and divergent worldviews and dreams, based on culture, environment, and upbringing.

— Geoff Berkshire

The Distinguished Citizen

Argentina-Spain

Taciturn novelist Daniel Mantovani (Argentine star Oscar Martínez, who won the best actor prize at the Venice film festival for his performance) has an ambivalent relationship to fame: It has brought him the kind of wealth few authors can ever imagine, yet he’s concerned such success means he’s not the challenging writer he was at one time — an idea that’s amusingly conveyed in the opening scene, when he voices his fears while receiving the Nobel prize. Five years later, the Barcelona-based author remains too much in demand, politely declining most offers, until he gets a letter from his hometown of Salas, Argentina. It’s been four decades since he’s been back, despite using Salas as the setting for all his stories, and his return provides not only humor, but poignant insights into such themes as the burden of success, lost ideals, and whether artists truly give back to the communities they’ve creatively mined for decades.

— Jay Weissberg

God’s Own Country

U.K.

In case it didn’t court “Brokeback Mountain” comparisons directly enough with its tale of two young sheep farmers finding love in a hopeless place, “God’s Own Country” seals the deal with one winkingly quoted shot: a work shirt draped on a wire hanger, poignantly removed from its wearer. Twelve years on, Ang Lee’s film has proven enough of a cultural milestone to merit such affectionate homage; luckily, Francis Lee’s tender, muscular Yorkshire romance has enough of an individual voice to get away with it, depicting a tentative romance between coarse English farmboy Johnny (Josh O’Connor) and the Romanian migrant worker Gheorghe (Alec Secareanu) who comes to work for the season. Intimacy doesn’t come naturally to a man who has been raised in a household where caring is expressed through work, but rather than over-exerting well-worn clichés about rural homophobia, the film reveals pockets of tolerance in unexpected places.

Guy Lodge

Heal the Living

France

A 17-year-old car crash victim lies brain-dead in a hospital, as doctors urgently pitch the virtues of organ donation to his distraught parents; over in another town, a middle-aged mother of two with a severely degenerative heart condition goes on the waiting list for a transplant. What sounds like fodder for a routinely gripping episode of “ER” is complicated with rare depths of personal and sensual detail in French director Katell Quillévéré’s sublimely compassionate, heart-crushing third feature. More polished but no less authentically humane than her previous works “Suzanne” and “Love Like Poison,” this spidering ensemble piece — adapted from Maylis de Kerangal’s internationally acclaimed 2014 novel — boasts beautifully pitched performances from the likes of Tahar Rahim and Emmanuelle Seigner. But it’s Quillévéré’s soaring visual and sonic acumen that suffuses this sad, potentially familiar hospital drama with true grace.

Guy Lodge

Hounds of Love

Australia

An outwardly normal suburban Perth couple who abduct, torture, and murder schoolgirls must face their funny games in this genre-bending powerhouse thriller from first-time director Ben Young. Brave audiences will be rewarded, if that’s the word, with a harrowing ride that morphs from discrete horror to probing character study and back again in a vivid yet admirably restrained 108 minutes. Far from Michael Haneke-level lurid, the film generates a coiled depravity and almost unbearable tension from the determined tracking shots of cinematographer Michael McDermott and Dan Luscombe’s trance-like, Tangerine Dream-inspired score. Clayton Jauncey’s production design is detailed and evocative, keyed around kitchen knives. For such a bold film to work, the performances must be all-in, and the three leads are committed to Young’s vision: Ashleigh Cummings is fearless as the would-be victim, while Emma Booth is terrifyingly skittish and Stephen Curry (who is, believe it or not, a popular Australian comedian) redolent of pure evil.

— Eddie Cockrell

Lost in Paris

Belgium-France

As anyone who has seen “L’Iceberg” and “The Fairy” knows, Abel and Gordon are quite possibly the two funniest clowns working in cinema today. No, really: Dominique Abel is a Belgian-born, burlesque-trained human pretzel and gifted physical comic on par with Chaplin or Keaton, while real-life Australian wife Fiona Gordon is a Tilda Swinton-tall redhead with Olive Oyl elbows and an Easter Island profile. With their latest film, they take audiences to Paris, where she plays a shy librarian desperate to find her missing Aunt Martha (the final role of “Amour” star Emmanuelle Riva), while he plays a harmless hobo who pops up practically everywhere she goes. Let the comic situations begin as this duo travels from one corner of the city to another (nearly getting incinerated at Père Lachaise cemetery one moment, dangling from the rafters of the Eiffel Tower the next), creating some of the funniest moments you’ll see on screen all year.

— Peter Debruge

Merry Christmas Mr. Mo

South Korea

A droll comic drama filmed in glorious widescreen black-and-white, “Merry Christmas Mr. Mo” follows a terminally ill barber (played by distinguished character actor Ki Joo-bong) whose dying wish is to make a short film directed by his distant son. What might have been a mawkish exercise in implausibility is instead fashioned into a consistently amusing and frequently touching tale of love, family and reconciliation with the past. Played to deadpan perfection by an appealing cast and directed with impressive assurance by first-time feature helmer Lim Dae-hyung, this lovely tale channels the spirit of early Jim Jarmusch films such as “Stranger Than Paradise” into its ultra low-key humor, dialogue non-sequiturs and loving monochrome photography of notionally unremarkable locations. Without ever succumbing to sentimentality, this offbeat crowd-pleaser will also move many viewers to tears by the time Mr. Mo’s task is completed.

Richard Kuipers

Strawberry Days

Sweden

Every summer, the Polish workers come to the Swedish countryside and pick strawberries. They tend the fields all day and keep to themselves at night, while the landowners hardly bother to learn their names. It’s a cycle as sure as the seasons themselves, though this year is different as one of the foreign fruit-pickers’ kids is old enough to take an interest in the host family’s daughter, and there among the strawberries a case of young love blossoms for the first time, complicating the entire arrangement, for the migrant workers are expected to make themselves invisible. In this sensitive, sun-kissed teenage romance, Swedish director Wiktor Ericsson invites us to recognize and identify with these faceless outsiders, asking for equality on the simplest terms. Though the setting may be specific, its appeal is universal, boasting a texture so rich, you can practically smell the ripe strawberries in the air.

— Peter Debruge

Those Who Make Revolution Halfway Only Dig Their Own Graves

Canada

With its multiple aspect ratios, on-screen quotes, and cutaways to news broadcasts and documentary footage — not to mention a musical overture and interlude — this three-hour Quebecois political epic unfurls with a bravado as outsized as its title. Inspired by the student demonstrations that sparked the Maple Spring in 2012, co-directors Mathieu Denis and Simon Lavoie apply the language of radical cinema to a tense, mournful and profoundly ambivalent portrait of radicalism. Following four far-left activists as they commit acts of vandalism and terror to foment an uprising against the capitalist system, the film channels their passion while insistently questioning their methods and perspective. Politics aside, the dynamics at the film’s heart are practically universal among youth movements, resulting in a bold portrait that pulses with the vitality of four young people who, however flawed or foolhardy, sincerely want to change the world.

Scott Tobias

Related storiesKarlovy Vary Film Festival Honors Talent Working in Front of and Behind the CameraFuture Frames Showcase at Karlovy Vary Casts the Spotlight on Promising Creative TalentKarlovy Vary International Film Festival Showcases Stories of Social Turmoil
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Lost in Paris (Paris pieds nus) movie review: French kicks

MaryAnn’s quick take… An exquisite miniature puzzle-box pop-up-book of a movie. All is color and light and exhilaration here, a fantastical lark that is sheer mischievous joy. I’m “biast” (pro): nothing

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

When we think of summer movies, we usually think big: action and explosions, superheroes and supervillains. But here’s another kind of perfect — absolutely perfect — summer movie: the exquisite miniature puzzle-box pop-up book that is Lost in Paris. This fourth film from the Belgian clown duo of Dominique Abel and Fiona Gordon (who wrote and directed as well as star) pits her hapless Canadian visitor against his insouciant tramp in the City of Lights as she tries to find the elderly aunt (Emmanuelle Riva: Amour) who has run away in order to avoid the social workers who want to plant her in a nursing home.
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Review: Lost In Paris, Somewhere Between Whimsy, Winsome and Wonderful

The latest collaboration between Dominique Abel and Fiona Gordon is a delicate, breezy and entirely endearing comic tale of love and kinship. Herewith I will admit to my shameful, total ignorance of the couple's previous features, L'iceberg (2005), Rumba (2008) and La fee (The Fairy; 2011, reviewed by our own Jim Tudor). They actually have been working together in film since at least 1994, when their short Merci Cupidon was completed. Per Cineuropa, they "met in Paris through their love of the circus" some 37 years ago and make their films in Belgium. I mention all that because Lost in Paris (Paris pieds nus) feels simultaneously fresh and also studied, like the latest chapter in a continuing, lighthearted epic that has little to do with...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Review: ‘Lost in Paris’ is a Surreal, Whimsical Treat

With a tip of the hat to Jacques Tati, Charlie Chaplin, and Jacques Demy, husband/wife team Fiona Gordon and Dominique Abel’s Lost in Paris is a whimsical, almost silent comedy set on the streets and in the parks of Paris.

Several years ago Aunt Martha (one of the final roles from the late, great Emmanuelle Riva) departs from a snowy arctic Canadian outpost for sunnier Paris. Several years later she’s lived quite a life with a reputation around the neighborhood, and now the stubborn elderly Martha refuses to leave her apartment and move into a nursing home. She writes to the older Fiona (Gordon), now a librarian in a remote village that looks like it might house Santa’s workshop, and summons her on the adventure of a lifetime to Paris. The only problem is Fiona’s French is rusty, leading to many a misadventure when she
See full article at The Film Stage »

Newswire: Get swept away in the magic of Lost In Paris in this exclusive clip

With the state of the world being what it is, we all need as many opportunities to escape into magic and wonder as we can get. Lost In Paris, the new film from filmmaking duo Fiona Gordon and Dominique Abel, is just one such escape, with a sense of whimsy that is being compared to Jacques Tati in early reviews. Gordon and Abel—who previously collaborated on 2007’s L’Iceberg and 2011’s The Fairy—come from circus backgrounds, and bring that same love of physical performance to the tale of Fiona (Gordon), a small-town Canadian librarian who rushes off to Paris after receiving a distressing letter from her elderly aunt, played by French screen legend Emmanuelle Riva. Once she arrives, she discovers her aunt has gone missing, leading to a madcap series of adventures in the company of Dom (Abel), a Chaplinesque tramp who takes a shine to ...
See full article at The AV Club »

‘Lost in Paris’: Enjoy The Fancy Footwork Of This Charming Retro Rom-Com — Watch

Oscilloscope has released an exclusive clip from their upcoming film “Lost in Paris” featuring some musical-style footwork to a jaunty ragtime melody. The romantic comedy follows the journey of a Canadian librarian named Fiona (Fiona Gordon) who travels to Paris, France after receiving a troubling letter from her 88-year-old Aunt Martha (Emmanuelle Riva).

Upon her arrival to France, Fiona is met with an astronomical amount of disasters, including a genial but annoying tramp named Dom (Dominique Abel).

Read More: Telluride Review: ‘Lost in Paris’ Does For Slapstick What ‘La La Land’ Does For Musicals

Directed by Fiona Gordon and Dominique Abel, “Lost in Paris” brings back the silly antics and choreographed slapstick comedy that is a staple in the directing duo’s work. Abel and Gordon previously collaborated on “L’Iceberg,” “Rumba,” and “The Fairy.”

While the concern for Fiona’s aunt is what jetsets her off to Paris, it
See full article at Indiewire »

Trailer Watch: Emmanuelle Riva Goes Missing in Dominique Abel and Fiona Gordon’s “Lost in Paris”

“Lost in Paris”

A woman travels to Paris with an unusual mission in Fiona Gordon and Dominique Abel’s latest offering, “Lost in Paris.” A U.S. trailer has dropped for the whimsical comedy, which centers on Fiona (Gordon), who decides to hop on a plane and visit Paris for the first time after receiving a letter from her Aunt Martha (Emmanuelle Riva). The spot shows Martha penning the note under duress. She explains, “After 48 years living in Paris they want me to move to an old people’s home. Ridiculous. I’m only 88!” So Fiona goes to Paris to see what she can do to help, only to encounter an unexpected problem: Martha has disappeared.

The trailer features lots of physical comedy, including a memorable bit where Fiona, posing for a picture, ends up falling off a bridge. We also catch glimpses of what Martha is up to.

Gordon and Abel’s previous credits include “The Fairy” and “Rumba.”

Riva passed away earlier this year. She received an Oscar nod in 2013 for “Amour” at the age of 85. She remains the oldest-ever nominee for Best Actress.

“Lost in Paris” opens in select theaters June 16.

https://medium.com/media/3893b9e843cf6625af64f4f6d0eebfe0/href

Trailer Watch: Emmanuelle Riva Goes Missing in Dominique Abel and Fiona Gordon’s “Lost in Paris” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Emmanuelle Riva in Trailer for Abel & Gordon's Comedy 'Lost in Paris'

"Will you dance with me?" Oscilloscope Labs has released an official Us trailer for the whimsical, quirky comedy Lost in Paris, made by (and starring) the filmmakers Dominique Abel and Fiona Gordon, known as "Abel & Gordon". This actually has the feel of a comedy made by Wes Anderson if he was French, with a overtly charming and amusing visual style along with absurd but entertaining humor. Emmanuelle Riva, who passed away earlier this year, plays Aunt Martha, who sends a letter to her niece which prompts her to travel to Paris to find out what's going on. There, she gets in all kinds of trouble and meets a lovable goofball named Dom, as played by Abel & Gordon. This looks surprisingly unique and totally fun to watch. Here's the official Us trailer (+ poster) for Abel & Gordon's Lost in Paris, direct from YouTube: When Fiona's (Gordon) orderly life is disrupted by a
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Film Review: ‘Lost in Paris’

Film Review: ‘Lost in Paris’
Quick, name the three funniest comedy duos working today. Amy Poehler and Tina Fey? Dave and James Franco? Zac Efron and his abs? Hollywood is constantly putting pairs of funny people together, often with perfectly hilarious results, but outside the realm of animation (where the dynamic still thrives), the centuries-old tradition of comedy couples — two funny performers with a familiar chemistry and a seemingly inexhaustible capacity to amuse loyal fans — has all but vanished from American movies.

Thank goodness for Belgian duo Abel and Gordon. They are, simply put, the two funniest clowns working in cinema today. No, really: Dominique Abel is a Belgian-born, burlesque-trained human pretzel and gifted physical comic on par with Chaplin or Keaton, while real-life Australian wife Fiona Gordon is a Tilda Swinton-tall redhead with Olive Oyl elbows and an Easter Island profile. And with their latest film, “Lost in Paris,” they are bound to
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Emmanuelle Riva Gets Whimsical in U.S. Trailer for ‘Lost in Paris’

With the genre of physical comedy sorely lacking in today’s cinematic landscape, Dominique Abel and Fiona Gordon are helping to revive it with some style with Lost in Paris. Starring, written, directed, and produced by the pair, the first U.S. trailer has now arrived for the whimsical comedy courtesy of Oscilloscope Laboratories.

The story follows a small-time Canadian librarian who ventures to Paris after receiving a letter from her aunt (the late, great Emmanuelle Riva). When she gets there though, her aunt has disappeared, and so begins a journey of mishaps. Judging from this preview, the Jacques Tati comparisons are spot-on for the film that will arrive this summer. Check out the trailer and poster below.

Filmed in Dominique Abel and Fiona Gordon’s signature whimsical style, Lost In Paris stars the filmmakers as a small-town Canadian librarian and a strangely seductive, oddly egotistical vagabond. When Fiona’s
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Lost in Paris’ Trailer: Searching For the Aunt Who Lives in Paris

Fiona Gordon‘s aunt lives in Paris and she’s trying to find her. Yes, that’s a La La Land joke, but the premise for Gordon and fellow director and co-star Dominique Abel‘s whimsical, candy-colored comedy Lost in Paris doesn’t do justice to the superb brand of physical comedy that the recently released trailer boasts. Fiona Gordon’s self-named […]

The post ‘Lost in Paris’ Trailer: Searching For the Aunt Who Lives in Paris appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Fresh French Comedy Lost In Paris Debuts Witty Trailer, Lovely Poster

A distinctive -- and very witty -- sense of humor is abundantly on display in a new trailer for Lost in Paris (aka Paris pieds nus). Sure, the quiet, knockabout physical comedy is apparent, but it's presented with grace and ease, as in 'Of course if you walk backward on a bridge you're going to be legs up in the river!' That makes it very appealing, even if you're someone like me who has not yet encountered the work of filmmakers (and stars) Dominique Abel and Fiona Gordon. In the words of the official synopsis ... Filmed in Dominique Abel and Fiona Gordon’s signature whimsical style, Lost in Paris stars the filmmakers as a small-town Canadian librarian and a strangely seductive, oddly egotistical vagabond. When Fiona's...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Film Festival Roundup: Hot Docs Announces Special Presentations, AFI Fest Dates 2017 Festival and More

Film Festival Roundup: Hot Docs Announces Special Presentations, AFI Fest Dates 2017 Festival and More
Keep up with the always-hopping film festival world with our weekly Film Festival Roundup column. Check out last week’s Roundup right here.

Lineup Announcements

– Hot Docs has announced the ten documentary features that will screen in this year’s Special Presentations program. Special Presentations features a high-profile collection of world and international premieres, award winners from the recent international festival circuit and works by master filmmakers or featuring some star subjects.

Special Presentations will screen as part of the 2017 Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival, running April 27 – May 7. The complete Special Presentations program and the full selection of films to screen at Hot Docs 2017 will be announced on March 21, including the 2017 opening night film.

The new titles include: “Bill Nye: Science Guy,” “Chasing Coral,” “Dolores,” “Elian,” “Joshua: Teenager vs. Superpower,” “In Loco Parentis,” “Nobody Speak: Trials of the Free Press,” “Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked the World,” “Strong Island” and “The Workers Cup.
See full article at Indiewire »

Les Arcs 2016 to spotlight new female film-makers

Les Arcs 2016 to spotlight new female film-makers
Houda Benyamina [pictured], Jessica Hausner and Rebecca Daly among directors due to attend the festival.

The Les Arcs European Film Festival will champion female filmmakers at its eighth edition unfolding in the heart of the French Alps Dec 10-17.

A sidebar titled The New Women of Cinema will screen features by 10 female directors including Houda Benyamina’s Caméra d’Or-winning Divines, Rebecca Daly’s Mammal and Rachel Lang’s Baden Baden.

Older titles such as Jessica Hausner’s Lourdes, Agnes Kocsis’ Fresh Air and Nanouk Leopold’s Brownian Movement are also included in the line-up

The initiative is an extension of the festival’s Femme de Cinema award introduced in 2013, the recipients of which have included Bosnian director Jamila Zbanic and Poland’s Małgorzata Szumowska.

Alongside the screenings, there will also be a presentation on a specially-commissioned study of emerging female directors, as well as round-tables and a master-class by one of the attending female directors.

The programme
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Les Arcs 2016 to spotlight new female filmmakers

Les Arcs 2016 to spotlight new female filmmakers
Houda Benyamina [pictured], Jessica Hausner and Rebecca Daly among directors due to attend the festival.

The Les Arcs European Film Festival will champion female filmmakers at its eighth edition unfolding in the heart of the French Alps Dec 10-17.

A sidebar titled The New Women of Cinema will screen features by 10 female directors including Houda Benyamina’s Caméra d’Or-winning Divines, Rebecca Daly’s Mammal and Rachel Lang’s Baden Baden.

Older titles such as Jessica Hausner’s Lourdes, Agnes Kocsis’ Fresh Air and Nanouk Leopold’s Brownian Movement are also included in the line-up

The initiative is an extension of the festival’s Femme de Cinema award introduced in 2013, the recipients of which have included Bosnian director Jamila Zbanic and Poland’s Małgorzata Szumowska.

Alongside the screenings, there will also be a presentation on a specially-commissioned study of emerging female directors, as well as round-tables and a master-class by one of the attending female directors.

The programme
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Lff 2016: Lost in Paris Review

  • HeyUGuys
Those who have seen a Fiona Gordon and Dominique Abel film will never forget their first time. From Rumba (2008) to The Fairy (2011), the duo’s romantic comedies are like no other currently out there, each exquisitely choreographed real-life fairy-tales about ‘real’ characters, the little people without a voice who get overlooked as life rushes […]

The post Lff 2016: Lost in Paris Review appeared first on HeyUGuys.
See full article at HeyUGuys »
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