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Curtains

Director Richard Ciupka’s Canadian slasher updates the old dark house theme as a group of aspiring actresses convene in a spooky mansion while trying to avoid a masked figure armed with a sickle and a bad temper. The 1983 film benefits from the welcome presence of Animal House’s John Vernon, John Steed’s former partner Linda Thorson and the exquisite Samantha Eggar.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Marvel's "Sub-Mariner" Makes A Splash

  • SneakPeek
With screen rights to Marvel Comics' 'Atlantean' superhero "Namor: The Sub-Mariner" returning to the Marvel fold, a big budget "Sub-Mariner" feature could make DC's "Aquaman" look like 'Charlie The Tuna':

"I can't speak for the studios," said Marvel's Joe Quesada about Disney recovering screen rights to Namor from Universal.

"But as far as I know, yeah we do (have screen rights). It’s not at Fox, it’s not at Sony...Yeah."

"Yes," confirmed Marvel Studios' Kevin Feige about Marvel controlling screen rights to Namor, "but it’s slightly more complicated than that."

"Let’s put it this way – there are entanglements that make it less easy.

"There are older contracts that still involve other parties that means we need to work things out before we move forward on it.

"...as opposed to an 'Iron Man' or any of the 'Avengers' or any of the other Marvel characters
See full article at SneakPeek »

Stephen Furst obituary

Actor, director and voiceover artist who played Flounder in the 1978 film National Lampoon’s Animal House

Flounder, the hapless fraternity student in the 1978 film National Lampoon’s Animal House, was Stephen Furst’s signature role, and one that Furst, who has died aged 63 of complications from diabetes, was typecast into recapitulating for much of the rest of his career. It’s Flounder (aka Kent Dorfman) who is told by Dean Wormer (John Vernon) that “fat, drunk and stupid is no way to go through life, son”. It’s Flounder who, after his friends have trashed his brother’s cherished car, hears Otter (Tim Matheson) explain: “You can’t spend your whole life worrying about your mistakes. You fucked up. You trusted us.”

But the sensitivity Furst brought to Dorfman, who gets into the frat only because, as Stork points out, “we need the dues”, made Flounder real and popular: he had a naive innocence, an unawareness of his physical appearance, and a caring sense of humour. Audiences could imagine him growing into the role of a kinder, gentler version of fellow student Bluto (John Belushi).

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Toga Party at The Hi-Pointe Saturday, February 25th – Animal House Screens at Midnight!

“Sophomore dies in kiln explosion? Oh My God! I just talked to her last week… She was going to make me a pot.”

Animal House Screens Saturday Night, February 25th, at Midnight at The Hi-Pointe Theater ( 1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117). Admission is only $5.

You know it makes you wanna Shout! Time to grab your toga and return to Faber College for the wildest frat party ever when Animal House (1978) screens at midnight at St. Louis’ fabulous Hi-Pointe Theater at midnight – one night only – February 25th

National Lampoon’s Animal House” stars comedy legend John Belushi and follows the uproarious escapades of the Delta House fraternity as they take on Dean Wormer (John Vernon), the sanctimonious Omegas, and the entire female student body. Directed by John Landis (“The Blues Brothers”), one of the most popular college comedies also stars Tim Matheson, Donald Sutherland, Karen Allen, Kevin Bacon, Tom Hulce and
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

'Sub-Mariner' Swims Back To Marvel

  • SneakPeek
In the wake of DC Entertainment introducing 'Aquaman' in a stand-alone feature, Marvel Chief Creative Officer Joe Quesada has confirmed that screen rights to Marvel Comics' "Namor the Sub-Mariner", the 'Atlantean' comic book anti-hero, will be returning to Marvel:

"I can't speak for the studios," said Quesada about Disney recovering screen rights to Namor from Universal.

"But as far as I know, yeah we do (have screen rights). It’s not at Fox, it’s not at Sony...Yeah."

"Yes," confirmed Marvel Studios' Kevin Feige about Marvel controlling screen rights to Namor, "but it’s slightly more complicated than that."

"Let’s put it this way – there are entanglements that make it less easy.

"There are older contracts that still involve other parties that means we need to work things out before we move forward on it.

"...as opposed to an 'Iron Man' or any of the 'Avengers'
See full article at SneakPeek »

Review: "A Special Day" (1977) Starring Sophia Loren, Marcello Mastroianni and John Vernon; Blu-ray & Region 2 UK DVD Release From Cultfilms

  • CinemaRetro
By Dawn Dabell

Fans of Sophia Loren will be ecstatic to learn new independent label CultFilms is in the process of releasing a collection of her award-winning movies. Launching this fine set is the wonderful Two Women aka La Ciociara (previously reviewed in Issue #34 of Cinema Retro), followed by A Special Day aka Una Giornata Particolare (which is reviewed here). Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow, Marriage Italian Style and Boccaccio 70’ are to follow. This collection showcases Loren at the top of her acting game and will be warmly welcomed by her fans and fans of Italian cinema generally.

Fascist housewife and mother of six Antoinetta (Sophia Loren) is busy trying to ready her family so they can attend a parade to celebrate Hitler’s state visit with Mussolini. Rushed off her feet, it becomes apparent she won’t be able to attend the momentous occasion as she has too much housework
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Killer Klowns from Outer Space Creator Teases New Trilogy Plans

Killer Klowns from Outer Space Creator Teases New Trilogy Plans
Back in March, Steven Chiodo, the director of the beloved 1988 horror cult classic Killer Klowns from Outer Space, revealed in a podcast interview that he wants to start a new trilogy, in the form of a TV series. The filmmaker, who was working on the project with his brother Charles Chiodo and Edward Chiodo, described the project as a "requel," which is a hybrid of both a reboot and a sequel. The filmmaker offered another update, and while nothing is set in stone quite yet, the filmmaker is confident that this unique project will happen. Here's what he had to say below during a recent podcast appearance.

"There's nothing coming out that you could guarantee. Look, Hollywood is a very fickle industry. We've been working on a sequel since the day after we made Killer Klowns from Outer Space. I mean we have tons of ideas on different directions we can take it.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Lee Marvin Died 29 Years Ago Today – Here Are His Ten Best Films

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

Lee Marvin rose through the ranks of movie stardom as a character actor, delivering mostly villainous supporting turns in many films before finally graduating to leading roles. Regardless of which side of the law he was on however, he projected a tough-as-nails intensity and a two-fisted integrity which elevated even the slightest material. Born February 19, 1924, in New York City, Marvin quit high school to enter the Marine Corps and while serving in the South Pacific was badly wounded in battle when a machine gun nest shot off part of his buttocks and severed his sciatic nerve. He spent a year in recovery before returning to the U.S. where he began working as a plumber. The acting bug bit after filling in for an ailing summer-stock actor and he studied the art at the New York-based American Theater Wing. Upon making his debut in summer stock,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

National Lampoon’s Animal House Returns to Theaters August 14 & 17

“Sophomore dies in kiln explosion? Oh My God! I just talked to her last week… She was going to make me a pot.”

You know it makes you wanna Shout! Time to grab your toga and return to Faber College for the wildest frat party ever when “National Lampoon’s Animal House” returns to movie theaters as part of Fathom Events and Turner Classic Movies’ TCM Big Screen Classics series. The event will take place at 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. local time on August 14 and 17 only and includes specially-produced commentary from TCM host Ben Mankiewicz before and after the feature.

From Universal Pictures Home Entertainment, “National Lampoon’s Animal House” stars comedy legend John Belushi and follows the uproarious escapades of the Delta House fraternity as they take on Dean Wormer (John Vernon), the sanctimonious Omegas, and the entire female student body. Directed by John Landis (“The Blues Brothers
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

'Sub-Mariner' Swims To Marvel

In the wake of DC Entertainment introducing 'Aquaman' in "Batman v Superman: Dawn Of Justice", Marvel Chief Creative Officer Joe Quesada has confirmed that screen rights to Marvel Comics' "Namor the Sub-Mariner", the first Atlantean comic book anti-hero, are back with Marvel Studios:

"I can't speak for the studios," said Quesada about Marvel recovering screen rights to Namor from Universal.

"But as far as I know, yeah we do (have screen rights). It’s not at Fox, it’s not at Sony...Yeah."

"Yes," confirmed Marvel's Kevin Feige about Marvel controlling screen rights to Namor, "but it’s slightly more complicated than that."

"Let’s put it this way – there are entanglements that make it less easy.

"There are older contracts that still involve other parties that means we need to work things out before we move forward on it.

"...as opposed to an 'Iron Man' or any
See full article at SneakPeek »

'Sub-Mariner' Swims Back To Marvel

In the wake of DC Entertainment introducing an 'Aquaman' cameo in "Batman v Superman: Dawn Of Justice", Marvel Chief Creative Officer Joe Quesada has confirmed the screen rights to Marvel Comics' "Namor the Sub-Mariner", the first Atlantean comic book anti-hero, are back with Marvel Studios:

"I can't speak for the studios," said Quesada about Marvel recovering screen rights to Namor from Universal.

"But as far as I know, yeah we do (have screen rights). It’s not at Fox, it’s not at Sony...Yeah."

"Yes," confirmed Marvel's Kevin Feige about Marvel controlling screen rights to Namor, "but it’s slightly more complicated than that."

"Let’s put it this way – there are entanglements that make it less easy.

"There are older contracts that still involve other parties that means we need to work things out before we move forward on it.

"...as opposed to an 'Iron Man'
See full article at SneakPeek »

Happy 86th Birthday Clint Eastwood! Here Are His Ten Best Films

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

Happy Birthday to one of We Are Movie Geeks favorite stars. Clint Eastwood was born on this day in 1930, making him 86 years old. The actor and two-time Oscar winning director hasn’t let his age slow him down a bit. Sully, his new movie as a director, opens in September.

We posted a list in 2011 of his ten best directorial efforts Here

Clint Eastwood has appeared in 68 films in his six (!) decades as an actor, and here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are his ten best:

Honorable Mention: Honkytonk Man

By the 1980s, Clint Eastwood was one of Hollywood’s most bankable stars. With his own production company, directorial skills, and economic clout, Eastwood was able to make smaller, more personal films. A perfect example is the underrated Honkytonk Man, which also happens to be one of Eastwood’s finest performances.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

30 Things You Might Not Know About Pretty in Pink, 30 Years Later

  • PEOPLE.com
30 Things You Might Not Know About Pretty in Pink, 30 Years Later
Pretty in Pink isn't just a good '80s movie. It isn't just a good teen movie. And it isn't just a good romantic movie. It's just a good movie, period. The John Hughes classic first hit theaters on Feb. 28, 1986, and it turns 30 years old this weekend. The film featured Molly Ringwald as Andie, a high school student whose style belies her working class roots. She's captured the eye of seemingly every guy in school - among them, preppy dreamboat Blane (Andrew McCarthy) and her little hipster buddy, Duckie (Jon Cryer). And the process of Ringwald's character trying to figure
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

30 Things You Might Not Know About Pretty in Pink, 30 Years Later

  • PEOPLE.com
30 Things You Might Not Know About Pretty in Pink, 30 Years Later
Pretty in Pink isn't just a good '80s movie. It isn't just a good teen movie. And it isn't just a good romantic movie. It's just a good movie, period. The John Hughes classic first hit theaters on Feb. 28, 1986, and it turns 30 years old this weekend. The film featured Molly Ringwald as Andie, a high school student whose style belies her working class roots. She's captured the eye of seemingly every guy in school - among them, preppy dreamboat Blane (Andrew McCarthy) and her little hipster buddy, Duckie (Jon Cryer). And the process of Ringwald's character trying to figure
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Curtains

When one looks back at mid ‘70s to early ‘80s horror, it’s quite surprising to see how many Canadian made films are nestled among fan favorites. Titles such as Black Christmas, Shivers, Prom Night, Happy Birthday to Me, and My Bloody Valentine continue to delight and shock veteran horror lovers or those just starting their jagged journey down the terror path. There is one, however, that due to a troubled production and poor distribution, seems relegated to the discount bins of time. Today, we’re pulling back the curtain on, uh, Curtains (1983), an unsung slasher weirder than a sack full of rabid beavers.

Released by Jensen Farley Pictures in March of ’83 in the Us, and September of ’84 by Norstar Releasing in (my home and) native land, Curtains received a very limited release in both countries, but coming as it did at a time when the Canadian film industry had
See full article at DailyDead »

A Special Day (Una giornata particolare)

Sophia Loren and Marcello Mastroianni star in a serious drama about two outsiders in Mussolini's Rome of 1938, an ordinary housewife and a political undesirable. They have a lot in common, as it turns out. Writer-director Ettore Scola condemnation of an oppressive authoritarian state, addresses the most basic human rights violations. A Special Day Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 778 1977 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 107 min. / Una giornata particolare / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date October 13, 2015 / 39.95 Starring Sophia Loren, Marcello Mastroianni, John Vernon, Françoise Berd. Cinematography Pasqualino De Santis Film Editor Raimondo Crociani Original Music Armando Trovajoli Written by Ettore Scola, Ruggero Maccari, Maurizio Costanzo Produced by Carlo Ponti Directed by Ettore Scola  

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Veteran Italian screenwriter and director Ettore Scola's best-known movie in the U.S. is 1974's We All Loved Each Other So Much, but my instant favorite is this 1977 drama. Movies about life under Fascism usually gravitate toward extreme,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Criterion Collection: A Special Day | Blu-ray Review

A testament to the importance of restoration, the new digital transfer of Ettore Scola’s 1977 title A Special Day is a beauty to behold. Premiering at the Cannes Film Festival, it went on to collect a number of accolades, winning a Golden Globe and a Cesar for Best Foreign Film, and scoring Marcello Mastroianni an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor. Scola is one of the great Italian auteurs who hasn’t received the same international renown as Fellini, Pasolini, Petri, and others, all considerable forces by the time Scola’s career was taking off in the early 1970s. He’s played in competition at Cannes eight times (winning Best Director in 1976 for Ugly, Dirty and Bad and Best Screenplay in 1980 for La Terrazza), and his most recent film, 2013’s How Strange to Be Named Federico was a playful homage to Scola’s friend, Fellini. In 2014, Criterion restored his 1962 title Il Sorpasso,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Marvel's "Sub-Mariner" - A Fish Out Of Water

In the wake of DC Entertainment introducing 'Arthur Curry', aka 'Aquaman' in "Batman v Superman: Dawn Of Justice" and hiring screenwriters Will Beall ("Gangster Squad") and Kurt Johnstad ("300") to write two separate screenplays for a solo "Aquaman" feature, Marvel Studios' Kevin Feige clarified whether or not his studio controls screen rights to "Namor: The Sub-Mariner", the first Atlantean comic book anti-hero:

"Yes," said Feige about Marvel controlling screen rights to Namor, "but it’s slightly more complicated than that."

"Let’s put it this way – there are entanglements that make it less easy.

"There are older contracts that still involve other parties that means we need to work things out before we move forward on it.

"...as opposed to an 'Iron Man' or any of the 'Avengers' or any of the other Marvel characters where we could just put them in..."

Debuting in 1939, Namor was created by writer,
See full article at SneakPeek »

Dead Right: How Dirty Harry Captured the ’70s Culture Wars

Part I.

1971 was an incredibly violent year for movies. That year saw, among others, Tom Laughlin’s Billy Jack, with its half-Indian hero karate-chopping rednecks; William Friedkin’s The French Connection, its dogged cops stymied by well-heeled drug runners; Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange, banned for the copycat crimes it reportedly inspired; and Sam Peckinpah’s Straw Dogs, featuring the most controversial rape in cinema history. Every bloody shooting, sexual assault and death by penis statue reflected a world gone mad.

It seemed a reaction to America’s skyrocketing crime. Between 1963 and 1975, violent crimes tripled; riots, robberies and assassinations racked major cities. The antiwar and Civil Rights movements generated violent offshoots like the Weathermen and Black Panthers. Citizens blamed politicians like New York Mayor John Lindsay (the original “limousine liberal”), who proclaimed “Peace cannot be imposed on our cities by force of arms,” and Earl Warren’s Supreme Court,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Animal House, Old School, Clueless and More! We Countdown the Top Party Scenes of All Time

Animal House, Old School, Clueless and More! We Countdown the Top Party Scenes of All Time
When it comes to letting loose, Animal House, for many of us, provided our first lesson on partying. From John Belushi who played the beloved John Blutarsky to John Vernon's role as Dean Vernon Wormer, the head of the fictional Faber College, the characters in the frat boy film are timeless—and we'll admit, we were never able to look at a toga in the same way after watching the 1978 classic. 25 years later, Old School introduced audiences to Frank the Tank (played by Will Ferrell) while simultaneously schooling us in the art of beer bong. And just four years after its release, Superbad hit the big screen, which illustrated why having a fake I.D. pretty...
See full article at E! Online »
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