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Joachim Trier’s ‘Thelma’ Opens Nordic Encounter in Haugesund

Joachim Trier’s ‘Thelma’ Opens Nordic Encounter in Haugesund
Norwegian director Joachim Trier – whose latest feature, the English-language “Louder than Bombs,” was Norway’s first contender for the Palme d’Or at Cannes in 36 years and won, among other plaudits, the Nordic Council’s Film Prize – will launch the 45th Norwegian International Film Festival in Haugesund. Unspooling on Norway’s west coast, it runs Aug. 20-25.

”Trier is one of our most important filmmakers and all his films have been on show here, so of course it is a pleasure to start with ‘Thelma,’” said festival and program director Tonje Hardersen, close to finishing the festival schedule. Starring Norwegian actress Eili Harboe, the film is a supernatural thriller about a young woman who falls in love and discovers she has frightening and inexplicable powers.

Thelma” will be the first of so far 78 films from 24 countries in the program and one of the rather few local entries in this year’s selection, compared
See full article at Variety - Film News »

10 Crucial George Segal Roles Beyond ‘The Goldbergs’

10 Crucial George Segal Roles Beyond ‘The Goldbergs’
George Segal rode talent and a hot streak to the top of the movie heap from the mid-1960s into the 1980s. If you only know Segal for his popular TV series “Just Shoot Me” and “The Goldbergs,” here are crucial earlier roles to check out.

King Rat (1965), dir. Bryan Forbes:

This was a break-out role for Segal, a prestigious WWII drama with a mostly British cast that included John Mills, Tom Courtenay, James Fox, Patrick O’Neal, and Denholm Elliott. Segal played a charismatically amoral American sharpie, scrambling to maintain his place at the top of the black-market heap in a Japanese prison camp.

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), dir. Mike Nichols:

Segal earned his lone Oscar nomination for this role, in Nichols’ adaptation of Edward Albee’s stinging marital drama. He brought brains and vulnerability as a college professor who, with his mousy wife (Sandy Dennis
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Richard Portman, ‘Star Wars’ Sound Engineer and 11-Time Oscar Nominee, Dies at 82

Richard Portman, ‘Star Wars’ Sound Engineer and 11-Time Oscar Nominee, Dies at 82
Sound engineer Richard Portman, who received 11 Academy Award nominations and won for his work on Michael Cimino’s “The Deer Hunter,” died on Saturday at his home in Tallahassee, Fla. He was 82.

“He was an icon of his craft of motion picture sound re-recording, recognized with the highest honors of his field,” his daughter Jennifer Portman wrote on her Facebook page. “He was eccentric, irreverent, and real.”

Portman worked on nearly 200 movies and mixed the sound for George Lucas’ “Star Wars.”

Portman received two Oscar sound nominations in 1973 for Francis Ford Coppola’s “The Godfather” and Michael Ritchie’s “The Candidate.” He was also double-nominated in 1974 for Peter Bogdanovich’s “Paper Moon” and Mike Nichols’ “The Day of the Dolphin.”

Portman received his first nom in 1971 for “Kotch,” directed by Jack Lemmon. He was also up for Oscars for Mel Brooks’ “Young Frankenstein,” Herbert Ross’ “Funny Lady,” Michael Apted’s “Coal Miner’s Daughter,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

7 Films New to Netflix to Watch In September 2016, Including ‘Zootopia’ and ‘The Imitation Game’

7 Films New to Netflix to Watch In September 2016, Including ‘Zootopia’ and ‘The Imitation Game’
Next month over on streaming giant Netflix offers up a giant selection of films of all stripes — modern to classic, animated to live action, Oscar contender to…not so much — and we’ve picked seven (well, really 11) that you should watch as soon as humanly possible, either for the first time or as part of a nostalgic little binge. Enjoy.

1. “Footloose” (available September 1)

If you’ve never experienced the original “Footloose” — no, not the one starring Miles Teller, though he is quite serviceable in a charming role — do yourself a favor and check out Herbert Ross’ 1984 classic. Yes, the concept of a town outlawing dancing is bizarre and outdated, but Ross and his cast (including Kevin Bacon in the kind of star-making role that’s so rare these days) really sell the concept, thanks to some serious drama and hard-earned emotion. But there is also dancing! It’s joyous and gymnastic and pure,
See full article at Indiewire »

Hmwybs: "The Turning Point"

Bancroft & Maclaine reminisce in The Turning PointBest Shot 1977 Party. Chapter 2

The Turning Point (1977)

Directed by: Herbert Ross

Cinematography by: Robert Surtees

When The Turning Point is remembered today, on the rare occasion that you hear it name-checked, it is nearly always in connection to its status as Oscar's all time loser (11 nominations without a win). That "achievement" was later shared when Steven Spielberg's The Color Purple (1985) met the same Oscar fate, entering the competition as a very big ticket and coming away empty-handed. It's surely no coincidence that both films are women's pictures. Oscar has grown increasingly wary of films about and for women over their 88 year history; that's not a mark on the films themselves but a stain on film culture and the Oscars. 1977 was in some significant ways, the very last Oscar year to be dominated by women. The sole "boys" movie up for the top prize was Star Wars,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines
This Friday, Café Society, the latest release from writer/director/comic godhead Woody Allen, waltzes into theaters — the 47th feature Allen has directed over a career spanning 50 years. (Yes, we're counting New York Stories.) He's had box-office successes and outright bombs, Oscar-winning masterpieces and critically panned duds. But regardless of his movies' receptions (and the reoccurring rumors about his personal life), he's managed to pump out a film a year with impressive regularity. Some key elements have stayed the same — once a jazz clarinet slinks onto the soundtrack, audiences know exactly who they're dealing with.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines
This Friday, Café Society, the latest release from writer/director/comic godhead Woody Allen, waltzes into theaters — the 47th feature Allen has directed over a career spanning 50 years. (Yes, we're counting New York Stories.) He's had box-office successes and outright bombs, Oscar-winning masterpieces and critically panned duds. But regardless of his movies' receptions (and the reoccurring rumors about his personal life), he's managed to pump out a film a year with impressive regularity. Some key elements have stayed the same — once a jazz clarinet slinks onto the soundtrack, audiences know exactly who they're dealing with.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Netflix UK: 25 underappreciated comedies to watch now

Mark Harrison Jul 1, 2016

Need a laugh? Here's our guide to 25 comedies that are on Netflix UK now, and are well worth your time...

Putting aside all of the chunter about VPNs and rising subscription costs for a moment, there are more hidden gems to be discovered on Netflix UK than you might expect, and we've been combing through the streaming site's current catalogue to find some of the most underappreciated comedies on offer.

We've come up with this fairly broad selection of films that varies on several fronts. We've picked out a mix of belly laughers and dark comedies, with a couple of dramedies thrown in for good measure. They're not all big Hollywood comedies, but neither are they all films that you're hearing about for the first time, though we've tried to order them according to how well known they may or may not be. What they all have
See full article at Den of Geek »

'Awards Chatter' Podcast — Richard Dreyfuss ('Madoff')

'Awards Chatter' Podcast — Richard Dreyfuss ('Madoff')
"I always knew this was what I was gonna do," says the film and television actor Richard Dreyfuss as we sit down to record an episode of the 'Awards Chatter' podcast. The 68-year-old made his name with a string of terrific performances in great films of the '70s: George Lucas' American Graffiti (1973), Ted Kotcheff's The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz (1974), Steven Spielberg's Jaws (1975) and Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) and Herbert Ross' The Goodbye Girl (1977). But the rest of his life and career — leading up to his most recent and acclaimed portrayal of

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Time After Time: The Origin of Wells vs The Ripper

Tony Black on the original of Wells vs. The Ripper…

It’s been quite the week for time travel TV shows, as first NBC’s Timeless dropped a trailer (and if that show could have more cliches, I’d love to know how), the announcement that Jeremy Carver has jumped from the good ship Supernatural to head up a TV version of Dennis Quaid/Jim Caviezel 2000 thriller Frequency (I know, you’ve never heard of it, but don’t worry), and now the trailer for Time After Time has landed on ABC. Anyone who’s seen it will understand the concept is simply thus: Hg Wells actually invented that time machine he wrote about *in* The Time Machine and when it’s knicked by his mate, none other than the world’s most infamous serial killer Jack the Ripper, Wells must follow him forward in time to the present day
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Christopher Walken Talks Career and That 'More Cowbell' Sketch

Christopher Walken Talks Career and That 'More Cowbell' Sketch
For a while, Christopher Walken felt like "troubled guys" were the only types of roles he was being offered, and he knows when it began. "In Annie Hall, I played a suicidal guy who drives his car into traffic," he says in his matter-of-fact, stilted, utterly Walkenesque way. "Then in The Deer Hunter, which came immediately afterward, I shot myself in the head. I was playing these disturbed people. That might have been when that started." When asked if that bothered him, he plainly says, "Listen, I'm lucky."

It's a bright spring day in Manhattan,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

DVD Review – The Secret of My Success (1987)

The Secret of My Success, 1987.

Directed by Herbert Ross.

Starring Michael J. Fox, Helen Slater, Richard Jordan, Margaret Whitton, John Pankow, Fred Gwynne.

Synopsis:

A college kid from Kansas moves to New York and blags his way to the top of a multinational corporation, falling in love along the way.

For a few years during the mid-to-late 1980s you couldn’t really get away from Michael J. Fox as the fresh-faced young actor seemed to be everywhere, appearing in several successful movies alongside his regular TV role in sitcom Family Ties. But in between his breakout movie role in Back to the Future and critical acclaim in more serious material like the Vietnam drama Casualties of War there was The Secret of My Success, a comedy that doesn’t always get the same recognition as Fox’s other hits but is probably worth another look if it has been a while.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Academy Awards Film Series: Near-Record-Breaking Oscar Loser Far Superior to Wayne Original

'True Grit' 2010: Hailee Steinfeld and Jeff Bridges. 'True Grit' 2010 review: 'Far Superior' to 1969 John Wayne Western I've gotten to the point with the Coen brothers where I just expect something wonderful every time they make a movie. For me, that was the case even with an effort like True Grit. For others, however, it was different. When the Coens announced their plans to adapt Charles Portis' novel, heads turned and were scratched by many. After all, not only were the brothers going to adapt a book, something they had done only once before (twice if you count The Odyssey), but they were going to remake a movie made famous by John Wayne in 1969. To many, especially lovers of Westerns, touching True Grit was sacrilege. But the Coens weren't deterred, and thankfully so. Their adaptation of True Grit is not only far superior to Henry Hathaway's 1969 version, it
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Academy Awards Film Series: From Class Distinctions to Incest - Adult Themes in First-Rate, Long-Thought-Lost Drama

'Sorrell and Son' with H.B. Warner and Alice Joyce. 'Sorrell and Son' 1927 movie: Long thought lost, surprisingly effective father-love melodrama stars a superlative H.B. Warner Partially shot on location in England and produced independently by director Herbert Brenon at Joseph M. Schenck's United Artists, the 1927 Sorrell and Son is a skillful melodrama about paternal devotion in the face of both personal and social adversity. This long-thought-lost version of Warwick Deeping's 1925 bestseller benefits greatly from the veteran Brenon's assured direction, deservedly shortlisted in the first year of the Academy Awards.* Crucial to the film's effectiveness, however, is the portrayal of its central character, a war-scarred Englishman who sacrifices it all for the happiness of his son. Luckily, the London-born H.B. Warner, best remembered for playing Jesus Christ in another 1927 release, Cecil B. DeMille's The King of Kings, is the embodiment of honesty, selflessness, and devotion. Less is
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Actor Woods Multi-Million Dollar Lawsuit Targets Twitter Users: Slander Case or Attack on Freedom of Speech Online?

James Woods in 'Videodrome.' James Woods in $10 million Twitter lawsuit feud: Crassly vocal right-wing actor goes after two crassly vocal users who attacked him In a letter dated Aug. 21, '15, Twitter attorney Ryan Mrazik ridiculed Surf's Up and Scary Movie 2 actor James Woods, while also highlighting the potentially dangerous precedent of a $10 million lawsuit the 68-year-old entertainer filed against a Twitter user last July. The lawsuit was followed by a subpoena demanding that the social media giant reveal the user's identity and that of another user with whom Woods has been embroiled in the (generally) no-holds-barred Twitterverse. In case you're unfamiliar with the name, these days the two-time Oscar-nominated Woods is best known for a supporting role as a right-wing sociopath in Roland Emmerich's thriller White House Down, starring Channing Tatum and Jamie Foxx (as a liberal-minded U.S. president despised by Woods' character), and for his relentless,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Richard Benjamin To Attend "The Sunshine Boys" 40th Anniversary Screening In L.A., August 4

  • CinemaRetro
Herbert Ross’s 1975 film The Sunshine Boys, which stars Walter Matthau, George Burns, and Richard Benjamin, celebrates its 40th anniversary this year. The Royale Laemmle Theater in Los Angeles will be holding a special one-night-only showing of the 111-minute film on Tuesday, August 4th, 2015 at 7:00 pm. Actor Richard Benjamin is scheduled to appear at the screening and is due to partake in a Q & A and discussion on the making of the film.

From the press release:

Fortieth anniversary screening of The Sunshine Boys (1975), Tuesday, August 4 at 7 Pm at the Royal.

Walter Matthau, George Burns, and Richard Benjamin star in the film version of Neil Simon's hit Broadway comedy about a pair of feuding vaudeville stars who are pressured to reunite for a TV special. The film was nominated for four Academy Awards, and Burns won the Oscar for his first significant film role since Honolulu in 1939. The
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Richard Benjamin Reflects On "The Sunshine Boys": A Cinema Retro Interview

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

On June 16, the Warner Archive will release the 1975 screen version of Neil Simon's comedy classic "The Sunshine Boys" as a Blu-ray special edition. The film stars Walter Matthau and George Burns as Lewis and Clark, a legendary vaudeville comedy team who have not been on speaking terms since they broke up their act eleven years ago. For their work in the film, Matthau was nominated for the Best Actor Oscar, George Burns won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar and Richard Benjamin, who co-stars as Matthau's harried nephew and agent who tries the Herculean task of reuniting the team for a television special about comedy greats, won a Golden Globe award. Cinema Retro had the opportunity to speak with Richard Benjamin about his memories of working on the film.  

Cinema Retro: "The Sunshine Boys" must have had a very personal meaning to you, given the fact that your uncle,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Time Machine: Oscar Winner-to-Be Bale with Wife on Red Carpet

Christian Bale and wife Sibi Blazic Bale at the Oscars Christian Bale and wife Sibi Blazic on the Academy Awards' Red Carpet Eventual Best Supporting Actor winner Christian Bale and wife Sibi Blazic Bale are seen above on the Red Carpet of the 83rd Academy Awards, held on Feb. 27 at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. The Welsh-born Bale took home the Oscar statuette for his performance as a boxer turned coach and junkie in David O. Russell's boxing drama and sleeper hit The Fighter. His co-stars were Mark Wahlberg (who also co-produced the film), Best Supporting Actress winner Melissa Leo, and Best Supporting Actress nominee Amy Adams. Christian Bale movies The Fighter was Christian Bale's first Academy Award nomination. Among his other movie credits are: The Dark Knight (2008). Director: Christopher Nolan. Cast: Christian Bale. Heath Ledger. Maggie Gyllenhaal. Aaron Eckhart. The Prestige (2006). Director: Christopher Nolan. Cast: Hugh Jackman.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Sarah Jessica Parker turns 50: 6 best roles from Sex and the City star

Sarah Jessica Parker turns 50: 6 best roles from Sex and the City star
It is a momentous day for Sex and the City fans around the world as Sarah Jessica Parker celebrates her 50th birthday. While the role of Carrie Bradshaw made Sarah a fashion icon and a superstar, she has starred in a wide variety of films and television shows over four decades. Parker began her career as a child star on the stage in Annie, and has gone on to become an enduring fixture in pop culture.

Her movie career was launched with supporting roles in '80s teen comedies Footloose and Girls Just Wanna Have Fun, but soon she grew into a leading lady with memorable roles in a string of early 1990s comedies. Parker might be best known for romantic comedies these days, but over the last 30 years she's impressed critics in roles as diverse a mystical witch, an egotistical talkshow host and the embodiment of a single woman of the 2000s.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Box-Office Alternatives: California Suite

When The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (2011) was released to stellar reviews and major box-office in the superhero-heavy summer of 2012, it became inevitable that a sequel would follow. Nearly three years later, audiences are being treated to The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (2015), which journeys back to everyone's favorite hotel in India where the walls are crumbling and the residents are aging in ways both hilarious and heartfelt. The cast, which includes Judi Dench, Maggie Smith and Bill Nighy, all seem game for a second round with the material and their characters. This appears true in particular of Smith, who seems to be having more fun than ever playing the eternally sarcastic Muriel Donnelly.

Smith's turn in The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel looks like definite fun, yet I wouldn't be surprised if it failed to reach the heights of her work in another hotel set comedy, California Suite (1978). Directed by
See full article at Slackerwood »
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