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The Lego Ninjago Movie karate kicks Blade Runner 2049 off top of the UK box office

17 October 2017 6:01 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Snowman gets a slightly chilly reception, while arthouse audiences warm to animated biopic Loving Vincent and Sally Potter comedy The Party

Opening in the UK with £3.64m, The Lego Ninjago Movie tops the box-office chart, elbowing aside Blade Runner 2049. It’s the second Lego-themed chart-topper this year, following The Lego Batman Movie in February. It’s also the fifth animated chart-topper, following Sing, The Lego Batman Movie, The Boss Baby and Despicable Me 3.

Continue reading »

- Charles Gant

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Lumíère Festival: Tilda Swinton – a British Iconoclast

15 October 2017 2:44 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Many actors profess to be surprised when they win an Academy Award; few look as sincerely stunned as Tilda Swinton did when she was named Best Supporting Actress in the 2007 ceremony, for her expertly frosted turn as a corrupt corporate lawyer in “Michael Clayton.” Her shock, one suspects, had less to do with how favored she was or wasn’t by the bookies than her bewilderment at being in the hunt for Hollywood gold in the first place: Little about the way the iconoclastic British star forges and curates her unusual career has courted the awards and embrace of the mainstream, yet they’ve found her anyway.

The Oscars certainly seemed a world away when the 25-year-old Swinton — who caught the acting bug while studying politics at Cambridge, and joined the Royal Shakespeare Company after graduating — began her film career with Derek Jarman, Britain’s pioneering godfather of New Queer Cinema. Playing the artist »

- Guy Lodge

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The Party review – the dinner bash from hell

15 October 2017 12:59 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

A politician’s soiree quickly descends into farce in Sally Potter’s star-laden satire, a sharply observed study of love and politics

The titular “party” of writer-director Sally Potter’s riotous tragicomedy is both a ghastly social function at which bourgeois lives unravel and the unnamed political opposition party through whose ranks Kristin Scott Thomas’s brittle antiheroine Janet ascends. She’s the newly appointed shadow health minister, a careerist idealist who believes in “truth and reconciliation” rather than shouting, punching and biting. Yet during the course of a single calamitous soiree, her right-thinking, left-leaning comrades will turn on themselves and one another in an increasingly farcical feeding frenzy. Indeed, when we first meet Janet, she’s pointing a gun at the camera, a harbinger of what’s to come in Potter’s short, sharp satire of love, politics and burnt vol-au-vents.

The scene is set in an upmarket London townhouse, »

- Mark Kermode, Observer film critic

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Quote of the Day: Sally Potter on Being a Feminist vs. Making Feminist Films

9 October 2017 8:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Potter: sallypotter.com

Sally Potter is a proud, self-identified feminist. As she told The Guardian in a new interview, everyone on her newest film, the black comedy “The Party,” received equal pay. However, she is hesitant to describe her movies — which include “Orlando,” “Ginger & Rosa,” “The Tango Lesson,” and “Yes” — as feminist in and of themselves.

In Potter’s opinion, the term “feminist” is only being applied to women-directed fare, even though compelling female characters have been featured in plenty of male-helmed films, too. “I object to having my films called feminist, implying they’re only for a certain audience of like-minded people and that the film itself would preach that line,” Potter explained. “Feminist is somehow different from saying ‘anti-racist.’ I would think of my films, or my life, everything in my life, as anti-racist, but you don’t hear that as a label. But feminist film is seen as specific.”

She added, “Why aren’t Ken Loach’s films called feminist? ‘The feminist filmmaker Ken Loach’ or ‘the feminist filmmaker Mike Leigh’ — why don’t we read that? And if not, why not?”

Potter has a point: We are more apt to describe women-directed films as feminist than their men-directed counterparts, even though “feminist” isn’t actually a gender-specific adjective or noun. And it seems that she has no qualm with the term itself — she is simply concerned that the description will marginalize her work.

“I’m completely proud of the word. The feminist movement is one of the most vibrant, extraordinary political movements of the 20th century, and now there’s a younger generation who’s taken it up again with great joy and pleasure, and that’s wonderful to see,” Potter says. “But I object to the way it’s used as a prefix to my work, to ghettoize it, often as part of a criticism rather than an appreciation. I just want to occupy a free space without a prefix. Because what does it mean? I have to ask someone, what exactly do you mean by that term and what is it adding to anyone’s understanding who might go and see the film?”

Starring Emily Mortimer (“Doll & Em”), Cherry Jones (“Transparent”), Kristin Scott Thomas (“The English Patient”), Cillian Murphy (“The Dark Knight” trilogy), Bruno Ganz (“Downfall”), and Timothy Spall (“Denial”), “The Party” is about a group of friends who gather for a dinner party that goes spectacularly off the rails. It opens in the UK this Friday, October 13. Roadside Attractions is handling the film’s U.S. distribution, but no official release date has been announced yet.

Quote of the Day: Sally Potter on Being a Feminist vs. Making Feminist Films was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Rachel Montpelier

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Watch an exclusive clip from The Party

9 October 2017 7:46 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Ahead of its premiere at the London Film Festival tomorrow and UK release this coming Friday, we’ve got an exclusive clip from director Sally Potter’s acclaimed comedy drama The Party; check it out here, or over on our YouTube channel…

Janet (Kristin Scott Thomas) has just been appointed to a key ministerial position in the shadow cabinet – the crowning achievement of her political career. She and her husband Bill (Timothy Spall) plan to celebrate this with a few close friends. As the guests arrive at their home in London the party takes an unexpected turn when Bill suddenly makes some explosive revelations that take everyone present by surprise. Love, friendships and political convictions are soon called into question in this hilarious comedy of tragic proportions.

The Party is set for release on October 13th and features a cast that includes Patricia Clarkson, Bruno Ganz, Cherry Jones, Emily Mortimer, »

- Gary Collinson

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Sally Potter: ‘There’s nothing like hearing a whole place vibrate with laughter’

7 October 2017 11:30 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The resolutely independent British film-maker is back with the most broadly entertaining film of her long career – a star-studded black comedy about a disastrous dinner party that reflects the dark state of the nation

Sally Potter isn’t quite sure how to react to seeing her name on a T-shirt. With bemusement, she turns over the garment I’ve given to her, as if concerned I might be playing a prank, but there it is: Sally Potter, emblazoned in bold black capitals on white cotton. She holds it up to her slender frame, its glaring whiteness almost garish against her tidy black turtleneck, and squints down at it. “People are wearing these?” she asks sceptically. Hers is one of several similarly stark tees celebrating women in film, run up by Etsy startup Girls on Tops, and now popping up all over the international film world. Isabelle Huppert has one. Ava DuVernay has one. »

- Guy Lodge

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Win A Signed Poster For Sally Potter’s Star-Studded ‘The Party’

6 October 2017 8:59 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Following its prize-winning world premiere at the Berlin Film Festival 2017, Picturehouse Entertainment will release Sally Potter’s superb The Party on the 13th October across the UK and Ireland, and to celebrate, we’ve got three signed posters to give away.

Janet (Kristin Scott Thomas) has just been appointed to a key ministerial position in the shadow cabinet – the crowning achievement of her political career. She and her husband Bill (Timothy Spall) plan to celebrate this with a few close friends. As the guests arrive at their home in London the party takes an unexpected turn for the worse when Bill suddenly makes some explosive revelations that take everyone present by surprise. Love, friendships, and political convictions are soon called into question in this hilarious comedy of tragic proportions.

The cast also includes the likes of Emily Mortimer, Cillian Murphy, Cherry Jones, Patricia Clarkson and Bruno Ganz.

To be in »

- Paul Heath

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Kristin Scott Thomas: ‘For me, Brexit is a disaster – talk about not knowing where you belong’

5 October 2017 8:08 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

After years bouncing between the UK and France – with the occasional Hollywood blockbuster for good measure – the actor’s role in Sally Potter’s film The Party was filmed in 12 days, during which the EU referendum took place. The result made her feel rootless, she says

It’s late afternoon inside a quiet London pub, and Kristin Scott Thomas has lost all track of time. She is recalling her big break in the business, playing Prince’s love interest in Under the Cherry Moon. She says this was back in 1983. I tell her it was 1986, and she insists that can’t be right – she ought to know because she was 24 at the time, and she was born in 1960. This, of course, only adds to our confusion. “Date discrepancies,” she concludes blithely. “Welcome to my world. I’m afraid I do that a lot.”

Scott Thomas is a precision instrument on screen, »

- Xan Brooks

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Newly Launched BFI Filmography Reveals Stark Gender Disparity in UK Film

20 September 2017 12:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Jodie Whittaker, one of the BFI Filmography’s most prolific actresses, in “Adult Life Skills

Today the BFI introduced the BFI Filmography, a complete, living record of all the 10,000-and-counting UK films released since 1911. While the resource is, as the BFI describes, “a treasure trove of new information,” it is also a revealing account of the pronounced gender inequality present in UK movies, both on and offscreen.

Among other issues, the filmography is plagued with gender stereotypes. The BFI found that the four character types women are most likely to portray are prostitutes, housekeepers, nurses, and receptionists. Of course, that’s when women are onscreen at all. As the filmography shows, the past century hasn’t featured much change in opportunity for female actors: women comprised 31 percent of film casts in 1913 and, so far, represent 30 percent of the casts in 2017.

Overall, female actors tend to work less than their male counterparts. For example, the most prolific male actor working today is Michael Caine, who has made 70 films to date. The most prolific actress still working is Judi Dench, who has made 41 films.

As for women in behind-the-scenes roles, the BFI Filmography includes only 23 projects with a majority-female crew, which amounts to about one percent. Just seven percent of the films made since 2000 were made by a majority-female crew. As one would expect, the number of women working on film crews has increased over the past 100 years — but the rate of change is still frustratingly slow. Women accounted for three percent of film crews in 1913, and by the early 2000s that number had grown to 27 percent. Women comprise 34 percent of this year’s film crews.

Women helmed only 4.5 percent of the BFI filmography and, like their onscreen counterparts, female directors tend to work much less than men. With 13 movies, Muriel Box (“Rattle of a Simple Man,” “The Piper’s Tune”) is the filmography’s most prolific female director. Maurice Elvey (“The Suicide Club,” “Love in a Wood”) is the most prolific male director with 151 films. That’s right: Elvey made over 11 times as many films as Box.

Director of Photography is the crew role that features the largest gender gap. Women DoPs have shot just 1.3 percent of UK films. With eight films, Nina Kellgren (“Young Soul Rebels”) is the female DoP with the most work experience.

The gender disparity of the BFI Filmography is disheartening of course, but it could also be a springboard for reform in the UK film industry — and not just for women’s representation. The lack of racial diversity in UK movies is also startling: 59 percent of the last decade’s films featured no black actors. As the BFI stated: “Whilst the BFI Filmography launches with a detailed look at gender, it is the intention to continue to build on the data, to provide a greater understanding of representation on and off screen.” Here’s hoping that studios really consider the BFI Filmography and decide that the next 100 years of cinema will be a better, more inclusive place.

Some additional stats from the filmography are below, courtesy of the BFI. Go to the BFI Filmography website to look through the new resource and find out more.

Most prolific women actors of each decade 1960–2017

1960s

Marianne Stone — 62 films

1970s

Marianne Stone — 37 films

1980s

Liz Smith — 14 films

1990s

Sadie Frost — 10 films

2000s

Shirley Henderson — 18 films

2010s

Kate Dickie — 13 films

Jodie Whittaker — 12 films

Most prolific women actors (still working)

Judi Dench — 41 films

Maggie Smith — 40 films

Vanessa Redgrave — 40 films

Sylvia Syms — 38 films

Liz Fraser — 37 films

Joan Collins — 37 films

Honor Blackman — 36 films

Jane Carr — 34 films

Julie Walters — 34 films

Helen Mirren — 33 films

4 Characters women are Most likely to play (when name/gender is unspecified)

Prostitute — 94% cast as women

Housekeeper — 91% cast as women

Nurse — 88% cast as women

Receptionist — 80% cast as women

4 Characters women are Least likely to play (when name/gender is unspecified)

Police Inspector — 0% cast as women

Police Sergeant — 0% cast as women

Steward — 0% cast as women

Taxi Driver — 0% cast as women

Most prolific women directors

Muriel Box — 13 films

Christine Edzard — 7 films

Gurinder Chadha — 7 films

Sally Potter — 7 films

Wendy Toye — 6 films

Mira Nair — 6 films

Penny Woolcock — 5 films

Beeban Kidron — 5 films

Debbie Isitt — 5 films

Mary McGuckian — 5 films

Newly Launched BFI Filmography Reveals Stark Gender Disparity in UK Film was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Rachel Montpelier

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Kristin Scott Thomas on ‘Darkest Hour’ and Rediscovering Her Love of Film

13 September 2017 8:26 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

This seating simply won’t do.

Kristin Scott Thomas, the Oscar-nominated actress, has just plunged into an oversized chair that threatens to completely envelop her slight, 5 foot 6 frame. With a slightly imperious air, she insists we relocate to a sectional couch a few steps away to talk about why she left Hollywood, her on-and-off love affair with the movie business, and “The Darkest Hour,” the film that’s brought her back into the spotlight.

“The Darkest Hour,” the story of the war cabinet crisis that threatened Winston Churchill’s prime ministry in the early days of World War II, is Gary Oldman’s show. He’s already considered to be the favorite to bag a best actor Oscar, but Scott Thomas should not be overlooked. In a few key scenes she etches a fully lived in portrait of Clementine Churchill, Winston’s wife and emotional ballast during those troubled times.

“It was a partnership, »

- Brent Lang

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Trailer And Poster Arrive For Sally Potter’s ‘The Party’

5 September 2017 2:51 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Picturehouse has released the trailer and poster for Sally Potter’s brilliant The Party, which arrives in UK cinemas on October 13th. Watch The Party UK trailer towards the bottom of the post.

The Party UK trailer and poster arrive

Janet (Kristin Scott Thomas) has just been appointed to a key ministerial position in the shadow cabinet – the crowning achievement of her political career. She and her husband Bill (Timothy Spall) plan to celebrate this with a few close friends. As the guests arrive at their home in London the party takes an unexpected turn when Bill suddenly makes some explosive revelations that take everyone present by surprise. Love, friendships, and political convictions are soon called into question in this hilarious comedy of tragic proportions.

Related: The Party review, Berlinale 2017

From acclaimed British filmmaker Sally Potter and featuring a star studded cast that includes Patricia Clarkson, Bruno Ganz, Cherry Jones, »

- Paul Heath

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Poster and trailer for comedy drama The Party

5 September 2017 2:15 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Ahead of its UK release next month, a poster and trailer have arrived online for the upcoming comedy drama The Party, directed by Sally Potter, the film stars Patricia Clarkson, Bruno Ganz, Cherry Jones, Emily Mortimer, Cillian Murphy, Kristin Scott Thomas, and Timothy Spall; take a look below…

Janet (Kristin Scott Thomas) has just been appointed to a key ministerial position in the shadow cabinet – the crowning achievement of her political career. She and her husband Bill (Timothy Spall) plan to celebrate this with a few close friends. As the guests arrive at their home in London the party takes an unexpected turn when Bill suddenly makes some explosive revelations that take everyone present by surprise. Love, friendships and political convictions are soon called into question in this hilarious comedy of tragic proportions.

The Party is set for release on October 13th. »

- Amie Cranswick

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Trailer Watch: A Celebration Goes Off the Rails in Sally Potter’s “The Party”

1 September 2017 7:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

The Party

A star-studded cast swaps barbs in a UK trailer for “The Party.” Described as “a comedy wrapped around a tragedy,” the black and white Sally Potter film features Patricia Clarkson (“House of Cards”), Emily Mortimer (“Doll & Em”), Kristin Scott Thomas (“The English Patient”), Cherry Jones (“Transparent”), Cillian Murphy (“The Dark Knight” trilogy), Bruno Ganz (“Downfall”), and Timothy Spall (“Denial”).

Janet (Scott Thomas) and Bill (Spall) are hosting a dinner party, but the latter seems both dazed and distracted. He waits until the guests arrive to say, rather formally, “I have an announcement.” We aren’t privy to what that announcement is, but it seems bad. Janet responds by saying she could “kill him.” And Bill and Janet are far from the only sources of drama.

One guest is described as “ridiculously handsome” but “a wanker.” Another is told his “cliches are unbearable.” Some of the exchanges are playful, and others are outright hostile. “I believe in truth and reconciliation,” Janet claims, before becoming overwhelmed with anger and biting herself. It seems like everyone is having a meltdown or on the verge of one.

“As people’s illusions about themselves and each other go up in smoke, along with the canapes, ‘The Party’ becomes a night that began with champagne but ends with blood on the floor,” the film’s official synopsis hints.

The Party” was very warmly received at the Berlinale, and currently boasts a 100 percent “Fresh” rating on Rotten Tomatoes. The film opens in the UK October 13. A U.S. release date has yet to be announced, but “The Party” is expected to hit North American theaters sometime in February 2018.

https://medium.com/media/811840b8d1102cd4ac1165e413fab615/href

Trailer Watch: A Celebration Goes Off the Rails in Sally Potter’s “The Party” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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Full Line-Up Revealed For The 2017 BFI London Film Festival

31 August 2017 3:31 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

The official line-up for the 2017 BFI London Film Festival has been revealed. The programme was announced at the Odeon Leicester Square in London this morning. Alexander Payne’s Downsizing has been named as one of the headline galas at the festival following a bow at Venice and Toronto.

Also amongst the line-up are Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool, with Annette Bening and Jamie Bell; Saul Dibb’s Journey’s End, Yorgis Lanthimos’ Cannes-fave The Killing of a Sacred Deer and also Last Flag Flying from Richard Linklater.

Guillermo del Toro will debut The Shape of Water, starring Sally Hawkins, for British audiences, and Lynne Ramsay’s Cannes-winning You Were Never Really Here also makes a show.

Also showing will be David Fincher’s Netflix series Mindhunter to the event, Takashi Miike’s Blade of the Immortal, Noah Baumbach’s The Meyerowitz Stories, Dominic Cooke’s On Chesil Beach, »

- Paul Heath

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‘The Party’ Trailer: Patricia Clarkson, Cillian Murphy & More Let Loose

30 August 2017 11:50 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Back in 1992, Sally Potter was a pretty big deal. She had just released “Orlando” to universal acclaim, which featured an exquisite performance from Tilda Swinton as the titular nobleman who moved through centuries of British history without aging. It was an ambitious film that put Potter on the map and gave us hope that she might be the next important voice in indie cinema. However, with every ensuing movie she made (“The Tango Lesson,” “The Man Who Cried,” “Yes,” “Rage,” “Ginger & Rosa“) it felt like she had hit her peek too early.

Continue reading ‘The Party’ Trailer: Patricia Clarkson, Cillian Murphy & More Let Loose at The Playlist. »

- Jordan Ruimy

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Movies Announced from Directors St. Vincent, Emily Harris, & Brittany Poulton

21 August 2017 10:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

St. Vincent: St. Vincent’s Instagram account

Several new women-directed films are on the way. According to recent reports, we can expect the feature directorial debut from musical artist St. Vincent as well as Emily Harris’ first solo feature. In addition, Brittany Poulton will write and direct her first feature film alongside Daniel Savage.

Per Variety, Annie Clark (aka St. Vincent) is set to direct a gender-reversal of Oscar Wilde’s “The Picture of Dorian Gray” from a script by David Birke (“Elle”). The original 1890 novel follows a bon vivant who stays young while his portrait ages. Clark’s project will see a woman play the titular role.

Clark made her directorial debut earlier this year with “The Birthday Cake” segment of the all-women-directed horror anthology “Xx.” The film also featured segments from Karyn Kusama (“The Invitation”), Roxanne Benjamin (“Southbound”), and Jovanka Vuckovic (“The Guest”). Clark co-wrote and scored “The Birthday Cake,” which follows a mother (Melanie Lynskey) who tries to keep her husband’s death a secret during her daughter’s birthday party.

Emily Harris’ first feature as a solo director will be “Carmilla,” a gothic love story starring Jessica Raine (“Call The Midwife”). The film will be adapted from the 1872 vampire novel by Sheridan Le Fanu. ScreenDaily broke the story.

Raine will portray Miss Fontaine, a governess whose ward is the isolated teen Lara (Hannah Rae, “Broadchurch”). “Struggling to find an outlet for her burgeoning sexuality, Lara is enchanted by the mysterious Carmilla (Devrim Lingnau, “Under Suspicion”) and the pair strike up a passionate relationship,” the source summarizes. “However, with rumors and superstition rife and with the exhortation of the family doctor (Tobias Menzies, “Outlander”), Carmilla’s presence in their home begins to strike fear into those around her.”

Principal photography on “Carmilla” will begin mid-September in East Sussex.

Harris, who also penned “Carmilla,” most recently directed rom-com “Love Is Thicker Than Water” with Ate de Jong. “Paragraph,” “Borges and I,” and several short films are among her other credits.

Finally, “Lizard King” writer-directors Brittany Poulton and Daniel Savage will explore the effect faith has on a person’s life in “Them That Follow,” Deadline reports.

“‘Them That Follow’ is a dramatic thriller set deep in the wilds of Appalachia, where a Pentecostal pastor, Lemuel Childs, and his believers handle venomous snakes to prove themselves before God,” Deadline writes. “The tale focuses on Lemuel’s daughter, Mara (Alice Englert). She holds a secret that threatens to tear the church apart: her romantic past with a nonbeliever, Augie (Thomas Mann). As Mara’s wedding to a devoted follower looms, she must decide whether or not to trust the steely matriarch of their community, Hope (Olivia Colman), with her heart and life at stake.”

Production is scheduled to begin in October.

Englert has previously worked with female directors like Hannah Cowley (“Flame of the West”), Sally Potter (“Ginger & Rosa”), and Alison Maclean (“The Rehearsal”). Next, Englert will appear in “Top of the Lake: China Girl,” the Sundance series created and co-directed by her mother, Jane Campion. The Elisabeth Moss-starring show returns September 10.

Movies Announced from Directors St. Vincent, Emily Harris, & Brittany Poulton was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Rachel Montpelier

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Locarno Critics Academy 2017: Meet This Year’s Aspiring Film Critics

15 August 2017 7:41 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The 2017 Locarno Film Festival recently wrapped its 70th edition, where several aspiring film critics participated in the latest edition of the Locarno Critics Academy, an international workshop to educate promising writers in the craft and discipline of contemporary film criticism. This year’s participants will contribute essays on highlights from the festival. Here’s an overview of their backgrounds and interests.

Name: Jaime Grijalba Gómez

Age: 27

Twitter handle: @jaimegrijalba

Home: Santiago de Chile, Chile.

Cinematic area of expertise: Chilean cinema, film festivals, horror cinema

Best movie you’ve seen in 2017: El mar la mar

Favorite book (or piece of writing) about film: Bresson’s “Notes on the Cinematographer”

I’m taking part in the Locarno Critics Academy because… I want to think that criticism today still has a role that goes beyond those interested in film or in making them. It has a role in society, and I want to find it. »

- Eric Kohn

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Win Passes To The Advance Screening Of Leap! In St. Louis

10 August 2017 12:09 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Opening on Friday, August 25th is the film Leap!

11-year-old orphan, Félicie (Elle Fanning) has one dream – to go to Paris and become a dancer. Her best friend Victor (Nat Wolff), an imaginative but exhausting boy with a passion for creating, has a dream of his own – to become a famous inventor. In a leap of faith, Victor and Félicie leave their orphanage in pursuit of their passions. But – there’s a catch, Félicie must pretend to be the child of a wealthy family in order to gain admittance to the prestigious and competitive Opera Ballet School in Paris. And with no professional dance training, she quickly learns that talent alone is not enough to overcome the ruthless, conniving attitudes of her fellow classmates, led by the devious Camille Le Haut (Maddie Ziegler).

Determined to succeed, Félicie finds her mentor in the tough and mysterious school custodian, Odette (Carly Rae Jepsen) who, »

- Movie Geeks

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6 ‘Unadaptable’ Books That Were Turned Into Movies, From ‘Watchmen’ to ‘Cloud Atlas’

2 August 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Never tell Hollywood it can’t do something. Over the years, the entertainment industry has gamely (and, often, unwisely) taken on projects that have been deemed unadaptable, often by their very own authors and creators. Such a film is bound for the big screen later this week, when Nikolaj Arcel’s already embattled “The Dark Tower” arrives, attempting to prove to audiences that adapting a sprawling Stephen King opus into a movie and television franchise after nearly a decade of starts and stops is, in fact, a good idea. It’s hardly the only example of such a gamble, and few similar attempts have managed to pay out, either financially or creatively.

Read More‘The Dark Tower’ Tested So Poorly That Sony Considered Replacing Director — Report

Sometimes “unadaptable” is just that, and perhaps even the best of books simply isn’t suited for a splashy filmed version. While it remains »

- Kate Erbland

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Elle Fanning is the Face of Teenage Sexuality at the Movies, and She’s Owning Every Role

28 June 2017 10:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Young actors confronting teenage sexuality on the big screen has often led to emotionally honest and powerful work. Think Adèle Exarchopoulos in “Blue is the Warmest Color,” Jess Weixler in “Teeth,” Bel Powley in “The Diary of a Teenage Girl” or Harris Dickinson in the upcoming Sundance winner “Beach Rats.” But if there’s one actor cornering the market on teenage sexuality right now and showing everyone else how it’s done, it’s Elle Fanning.

Read More: How ‘The Beguiled’ Castrated Its Male Lead In Sofia Coppola’s Most Freudian Film Yet

The 19-year-old indie darling has become increasingly interested in characters coming to terms with their burgeoning sexuality, and she’s owning every one of them with refined and intuitive work. It’s particularly impressive that Fanning has never tackled the subject the same way from performance to performance. She’s constantly exploring all facets of teenage sexuality, »

- Zack Sharf

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