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‘Nature Boy’ Review: Ric Flair Documentary Effectively Grapples with a Pro Wrestling Icon Lost in His Own Persona

‘Nature Boy’ Review: Ric Flair Documentary Effectively Grapples with a Pro Wrestling Icon Lost in His Own Persona
Much like the life of the mammoth pro wrestling personality it profiles, “Nature Boy” is both a celebration and a warning siren for would-be aspirants to fame and fortune. The latest installment of Espn’s “30 for 30” documentary series is under no delusion that Ric Flair didn’t enjoy (or at many points, bask in) his popularity as one of the biggest pro athletes in the world. But Rory Karpf‘s film also provides some helpful and needed context for the man that he was when he wasn’t landing pile drives. Those two figures may have eventually blurred together to the point of being unrecognizable, but the film does an admirable job of trying to distinguish between the two.

In true biographical fashion, “Nature Boy” charts Flair’s upbringing in an adoptive home, through his less-than-stellar academic career, to the origins of his wrestling superstardom. Eventually embracing a career that he initially shied away from,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Nature Boy’ Review: Ric Flair Documentary Effectively Grapples with a Pro Wrestling Icon Lost in His Own Persona

‘Nature Boy’ Review: Ric Flair Documentary Effectively Grapples with a Pro Wrestling Icon Lost in His Own Persona
Much like the life of the mammoth pro wrestling personality it profiles, “Nature Boy” is both a celebration and a warning siren for would-be aspirants to fame and fortune. The latest installment of Espn’s “30 for 30” documentary series is under no delusion that Ric Flair didn’t enjoy (or at many points, bask in) his popularity as one of the biggest pro athletes in the world. But Rory Karpf‘s film also provides some helpful and needed context for the man that he was when he wasn’t landing pile drives. Those two figures may have eventually blurred together to the point of being unrecognizable, but the film does an admirable job of trying to distinguish between the two.

In true biographical fashion, “Nature Boy” charts Flair’s upbringing in an adoptive home, through his less-than-stellar academic career, to the origins of his wrestling superstardom. Eventually embracing a career that he initially shied away from,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

A Sight for Sounds: Moments in Movies Instantly Elevated by the Use of Music

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Andy Furlong

When Guardians of the Galaxy was first released in 2014 for all its quirk and swagger the thing that really separated it from the rest of the Marvel pack was its use of music. Director James Gunn revealed that the film’s composer, Tyler Bates, had written large chunks of the score first so that they could film to the actual music. In many ways the film’s personality is its score, and with the release of the sequel Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 in cinemas this week audiences can expect more of the same.

Music is probably the most important thing in cinema for instantly establishing mood, tone and visual cues. From the menacing piano keys of John Williams’ memorable score in Jaws to the sheer elation of Alan Silvestri’s triumphant overture in Back to the Future, a film’s accompanying score is often as unforgettable as the movie itself.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Malcolm McDowell to Play Strauss in Nazi-Era ‘Legacy of Fire’ (Exclusive)

Malcolm McDowell to Play Strauss in Nazi-Era ‘Legacy of Fire’ (Exclusive)
Mozart in the Jungle” actor Malcolm McDowell is being lined up to play German composer Richard Strauss in the movie “Legacy of Fire,” producer Timothy Haas announced Friday.

The production, set to shoot at Bavaria Film Studios, Germany, in late summer, centers on Strauss’ battle to save his Jewish daughter-in-law Alice during the Nazi period.

Stuart Orme directs from a screenplay written by Haas, with additional material from Wendy Oberman.

Moulin Rouge!” production designer Brigitte Broch is attached to the project, and “Hacksaw Ridge” composer Rupert Gregson Williams is in talks to join the production, Haas said.

Haas and Philip Waley produce for Haas Silver Levene Film Studios, alongside Bernie Stampfer, Markus R. Vogelbacher and Roland Schaffner for International Film Partners.

Other projects on Hsl’s development slate include “On the Edge of Darkness,” “The Hunt for Sister Edith,” “The Inside Outside Man” and “The Secrets of the Notebook.”

Related
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Elle’ Director Paul Verhoeven’s 10 Tips For a Successful Career After Hollywood

‘Elle’ Director Paul Verhoeven’s 10 Tips For a Successful Career After Hollywood
These are challenging times for any filmmaker who doesn’t want to be told what to do. Chasing a slice of the Hollywood studio pie almost always brings compromise, and many foreign-born directors return to their home countries and assemble independent film and television projects.

That was the path of Dutch-born Paul Verhoeven, whose career began in his own language with “Soldier of Orange” and the Oscar-nominated “Turkish Delight.” From there he forged an A-list career that included “Basic Instinct” (which played competition in Cannes) “RoboCop,” “Total Recall,” “Starship Troopers,” and, yes, “Showgirls.” His last Hollywood movie was “Hollow Man” with Kevin Bacon in 2000.

When Verhoeven could no longer find material that suited him, he went back to Holland. His 2006 Dutch World War II drama “Black Book” (Sony Pictures Classics) starred Carice Van Houten, before she joined “Game of Thrones,” and was shortlisted for the foreign Oscar.

Now he has
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Elle’ Director Paul Verhoeven’s 10 Tips For a Successful Career After Hollywood

  • Indiewire
‘Elle’ Director Paul Verhoeven’s 10 Tips For a Successful Career After Hollywood
These are challenging times for any filmmaker who doesn’t want to be told what to do. Chasing a slice of the Hollywood studio pie almost always brings compromise, and many foreign-born directors return to their home countries and assemble independent film and television projects.

That was the path of Dutch-born Paul Verhoeven, whose career began in his own language with “Soldier of Orange” and the Oscar-nominated “Turkish Delight.” From there he forged an A-list career that included “Basic Instinct” (which played competition in Cannes) “RoboCop,” “Total Recall,” “Starship Troopers,” and, yes, “Showgirls.” His last Hollywood movie was “Hollow Man” with Kevin Bacon in 2000.

When Verhoeven could no longer find material that suited him, he went back to Holland. His 2006 Dutch World War II drama “Black Book” (Sony Pictures Classics) starred Carice Van Houten, before she joined “Game of Thrones,” and was shortlisted for the foreign Oscar.

Now he has
See full article at Indiewire »

5-Minute Supercut Pays Tribute To The Cinematic Genius Of Stanley Kubrick

Richard Strauss may never have dreamed that his 1896 tone poem, inspired by Friedrich Nietzsche, “Thus spoke Zarathustra,” would be infamous thanks to the use of the fanfare in Stanley Kubrick‘s stunning 1968 “2001: A Space Odyssey.” Then again, if Strauss were alive at the time, perhaps he’d of picked Kubrick to direct a version of “Salome” on […]

The post 5-Minute Supercut Pays Tribute To The Cinematic Genius Of Stanley Kubrick appeared first on The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Tom Hanks Gets Emotional While Discussing Lonely Childhood: 'What Have You Done to Me'

  • PEOPLE.com
Tom Hanks Gets Emotional While Discussing Lonely Childhood: 'What Have You Done to Me'
Tom Hanks may be an internationally known and much-loved actor, but that doesn't take the sting out of his lonely childhood memories. Hanks, 59, got emotional when talking to Kirsty Young, the host of Desert Island Discs on BBC Radio 4, and explaining the eight records he would take with him to a desert island. The desert island scenario is surely one that Hanks is familiar with - he famously played a man lost at sea for 14 months in the movie Castaway", which earned him an Oscar nomination in 2000. During the segment, the actor had to compose himself several times when talking
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Marrakech: Atom Egoyan Says He’s Ready To Tackle Sci-Fi And Another Opera

Marrakech: Atom Egoyan Says He’s Ready To Tackle Sci-Fi And Another Opera
Marrakech– Canuck auteur Atom Egoyan, who is attending Marrakech film festival to receive a tribute to Canadian cinema and present his latest film, “Remember,” said he was currently working on a science-fiction project which will likely be produced as a TV series.

Egoyan revealed he was developing an adaptation of science-fiction book about Artificial Intelligence.

“This book looks at the history of Artificial Intelligence from (the point of view of) people who dedicated their lives to artificial intelligence and who have personal needs to find it.”

Added Egoyan, “It becomes very political because artificial intelligence is the next domain. Suddenly there is the possibility of creating beings with brains that are more progressive than ours so it’s gets hugely political.”

The soft-spoken helmer said the sic-fi project was more suited for TV drama than a feature.

Speaking of TV prospects, Egoyan said he experimented television at the beginning of his career.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Stanley Kubrick the Studio Auteur

Throughout the 1960s-early 1970s, a combination of financial desperation, creative daring, and an adventurous movie-going public had produced a creative detonation in mainstream American movies not seen before or since. Each year of the period seemed to bring at least one mightily ambitious visual experiment by a new contributor to the commercial movie scene, the “look” of that effort being as much a part of its identity as its characters and story. One could pick no better representative of the trend than Stanley Kubrick, for no director of the time so extended the boundaries of mainstream commercial filmmaking, or what it meant to be a mainstream commercial filmmaker.

For the most part, Kubrick’s professional ascent was built on the taking of standard genres – the war story, science fiction tale, sword-and-sandal epic – and twisting them into shapes so singular that each Kubrick outing became an acknowledged one-of-a-kind classic. Paths of Glory
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Art Song, Part 1: Lieder

A major glossy magazine that used to be devoted largely to music -- but long ago fell under the spell of Hollywood celebrity -- still continues to cover music, specializing in listicles that seem designed mainly to provoke ire in those who care more about music than does said magazine (named after a classic blues song, in case you can't guess without a hint). This summer it unleashed a list of songs that, with that aging publication's ironically weak sense of history, managed to overlook the vast majority of the history of song. To put it bluntly, if you're claiming to discuss the best songs ever written and you don't even mention Franz Schubert, you're an ignoramus. My ire over this blinkered attitude towards music history festered for months, so I finally decided to do something about it by writing about some of the timeless songs omitted in the aforementioned myopic listicle.
See full article at CultureCatch »

Watch U2 Busk in Subway, Ride Bikes on 'Tonight Show'

Watch U2 Busk in Subway, Ride Bikes on 'Tonight Show'
U2 finally made their long-awaited visit to The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, an appearance that was delayed six months as Bono recovered from a major cycling accident. "I had the humerus bone sticking out of the leather jacket," the singer told Fallon during the episode. While the accident forced the band to postpone their weeklong Tonight Show residency in November, U2 made amends by spending the entire episode with Fallon, resulting in a pair of sketches, an interview and a three-song performance.

The highlight of U2's Tonight Show
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Watch the ’2001′ Opening With Alex North’s Original Score

The music of Richard Strauss and Stanley Kubrick‘s 2001: A Space Odyssey are all but inseparable at this point, as the fanfare from Strauss’ composition ‘Also sprach Zarathustra’ became the unforgettable sonic accompaniment to the opening of Kubrick’s film. But the movie was originally going to be scored by Alex North. In fact, North composed an […]

The post Watch the ’2001′ Opening With Alex North’s Original Score appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Czech Philharmonic and Jirí Bělohlávek Shine at Carnegie

Czech Philharmonic/Jirí Bělohlávek with Jean-Yves Thibaudet Janáček: Taras Bulba Liszt: Piano Concerto No. 2 Dvořák:Symphony No. 9, "From the New World" Carnegie Hall Nov. 16, 2014

Since I previewed this Sunday afternoon concert, I'll skip repeating the background information -- except to note that I've since learned this was the group's first NYC appearance in ten years -- and get right to considering the performance itself. To give away the conclusion up front, in my notes, I used the words "perfect" and "wonderful" a lot.

The Janáček tone poem opened the program. It's not a favorite of mine (actually, it may be my least favorite piece by this composer), but Bělohlávek and his band can't be faulted. Tempos were a bit on the quick side (23 minutes total), welcomingly limiting the bombast somewhat, yet everything was still crystal clear. Early on the concertmaster, Josef Špaček Jr., demonstrated his magnificent combination of warm tone, supple phrasing,
See full article at CultureCatch »

Conductor Kristjan Jarvi on Giving 'Gangnam Style' a Classical Spin (Q&A)

With over 2.11 billion views on YouTube, "Gangnam Style" has inspired countless parodies and remixes, but Grammy-nominated conductor Kristjan Jarvi is showcasing the hit song in a way that's never been heard before: programmed to Pablo de Sarasate's late 19th-century classical staple "Zigeunerweisen" (you may recognize it from the cartoon-inspired chase scene in Stephen Chow's Kung Fu Hustle). Jarvi has been reputed for fusing Duke Ellington with Richard Strauss and founded the Absolute Ensemble in 1993 to tackle everything from renaissance music to rock. For his latest take on K-pop, he managed to convince Korean-

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Brazil's Poverty Featured in Fauston da Silva's ‘My Friend Nietzsche': TheWrap's ShortList Quickie

  • The Wrap
Fáuston da Silva didn't need an expansive set budget to create the poor town he featured in his inspirational short film, “My Friend Nietzsche,” he only needed to look outside his window and shoot what was already there. The fifteen minute short follows a poor, young boy with lackluster reading skills, but an insatiable thirst for knowledge. When he literally stumbles across a copy of philosopher Frederick Nietzsche's iconic novel “Thus Spoke Zarathustra” while Richard Strauss’ classic (and identically titled) 1896 composition blasts in the background. The boy's curiosity is piqued. Watch The Wrap's ShortList Film Festival Finalists and Vote For Your Favorites The.
See full article at The Wrap »

Al Pacino’s Salomé and Wilde Salomé to screen at the BFI with special Q&A session

From the press release:

Al Pacino’s Salomé and Wilde Salomé based on Oscar Wilde’s play, are to get a UK release as part of a very special event at BFI Southbank, London. The two films produced by Barry Navidi (The Merchant of Venice) and Robert Fox (The Hours), will be presented together on Sunday 21st September and followed by a Q&A with Academy Award winner Al Pacino that will be broadcast live via satellite to cinemas across the UK and Ireland. The unique event will be hosted by Stephen Fry.

Salomé is Oscar Wilde’s most controversial work, banned in London in the late 19th Century. This scintillating tale of lust, greed and revenge follows the legend of King Herod and his lust for his young stepdaughter, Salomé, and her sexual baiting of John the Baptist. Wilde’s adaptation has spawned multiple stage productions including an opera by Richard Strauss,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Listen to the Unused, Rejected Score for Stanley Kubrick's '2001: A Space Odyssey'

2001: A Space Odyssey is a stunning, laconic view of space travel — which is why music plays such a critical role in the effectiveness of the picture. Director Stanley Kubrick used iconic classical music tracks to accompany his near-silent epic, but Johann Strauss II and the Vienna Philharmonic’s rendition of Richard Strauss tone poem weren’t Kubrick’s first choices for the picture. Early in the film’s production, Kubrick commissioned Dr. Strangelove collaborator Alex North to create the soundtrack for 2001. That composition is currently available online via Filmmaker Iq. The website advises: This theme music made its public debut in early 1993 as part of the Telarc compilation CD Hollywood’s Greatest Hits, Vol. 2, by Erich Kunzel and...

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See full article at Movies.com »

Listen to Alex North's Original, Rejected '2001: A Space Odyssey' Score

Today, FilmmakerIQ posted the following snippet of Alex North's original score for Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey. The score was ultimately rejected and, in the case of the film's opening title sequence, the score was replaced by Richard Strauss's "Also sprach Zarathustra" composed in 1896. There are a couple ways to look and listen to this piece, but I think the best is to consider just how much we're all likely to prefer Kubrick's decision on which music to go with, especially once you you consider the following interview snippet from an interview in which Michel Ciment noted, "You have abandoned original film music in your last three films." Kubrick's response: Exclude a pop music score from what I am about to say. However good our best film composers may be, they are not a Beethoven, a Mozart or a Brahms. Why use music which is less
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Davidson on the Secret Star of the Metropolitan Opera’s Arabella

  • Vulture
Davidson on the Secret Star of the Metropolitan Opera’s Arabella
Richard Strauss’s opera Arabella is a work of virtuosic nostalgia. In July 1933, when Germany had already taken its first steps into the inferno, Strauss produced a glittering romance full of fancy balls, last waltzes, mistaken identities, and virginal kisses. With music that recalled his 1911 opera Rosenkavalier, set in the Vienna of half a century before that and centered on an ancient family well past its glory days, Arabella is a layer cake of wistfulness. The Metropolitan Opera has ladled out its own stock of memories. The late Otto Schenck’s production, a gilded cornucopia of wrought-iron balustrades, circular settees, chandeliers, and drapery, originated during the Reagan years and hasn’t been seen here since 2001. The deluxe, ahh-inducing décor is profoundly out of fashion at the Met, but in this piece it feels just right.Strauss in his ballroom-and-boudoir mode demands tenderness, humor, and delicacy, and conductor Philippe Auguin obliges,
See full article at Vulture »
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