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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

15 items from 2014


Watch the ’2001′ Opening With Alex North’s Original Score

32 minutes ago | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

The music of Richard Strauss and Stanley Kubrick‘s 2001: A Space Odyssey are all but inseparable at this point, as the fanfare from Strauss’ composition ‘Also sprach Zarathustra’ became the unforgettable sonic accompaniment to the opening of Kubrick’s film. But the movie was originally going to be scored by Alex North. In fact, North composed an […]

The post Watch the ’2001′ Opening With Alex North’s Original Score appeared first on /Film. »

- Russ Fischer

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Czech Philharmonic and Jirí Bělohlávek Shine at Carnegie

17 November 2014 8:56 PM, PST | www.culturecatch.com | See recent CultureCatch news »

Czech Philharmonic/Jirí Bělohlávek with Jean-Yves Thibaudet Janáček: Taras Bulba Liszt: Piano Concerto No. 2 Dvořák:Symphony No. 9, "From the New World" Carnegie Hall Nov. 16, 2014

Since I previewed this Sunday afternoon concert, I'll skip repeating the background information -- except to note that I've since learned this was the group's first NYC appearance in ten years -- and get right to considering the performance itself. To give away the conclusion up front, in my notes, I used the words "perfect" and "wonderful" a lot.

The Janáček tone poem opened the program. It's not a favorite of mine (actually, it may be my least favorite piece by this composer), but Bělohlávek and his band can't be faulted. Tempos were a bit on the quick side (23 minutes total), welcomingly limiting the bombast somewhat, yet everything was still crystal clear. Early on the concertmaster, Josef Špaček Jr., demonstrated his magnificent combination of warm tone, supple phrasing, »

- SteveHoltje

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Conductor Kristjan Jarvi on Giving 'Gangnam Style' a Classical Spin (Q&A)

23 October 2014 6:24 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

With over 2.11 billion views on YouTube, "Gangnam Style" has inspired countless parodies and remixes, but Grammy-nominated conductor Kristjan Jarvi is showcasing the hit song in a way that's never been heard before: programmed to Pablo de Sarasate's late 19th-century classical staple "Zigeunerweisen" (you may recognize it from the cartoon-inspired chase scene in Stephen Chow's Kung Fu Hustle). Jarvi has been reputed for fusing Duke Ellington with Richard Strauss and founded the Absolute Ensemble in 1993 to tackle everything from renaissance music to rock. For his latest take on K-pop, he managed to convince Korean-

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- Lee Hyo-won

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Justin Timberlake and Jimmy Fallon's iPhone commercial is kind of like '2001: A Space Odyssey'

9 September 2014 5:02 PM, PDT | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

Thanks to its role in 2001: A Space Odyssey, Richard Strauss’ “Thus Spoke Zarathustra” has practically become synonymous with technology. (Need a refresher? Click here. Need a laugh? Follow this link.)

It’s no surprise, then, that the musical number was used in a commercial for iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, which were announced today in a rather grandiose way.

In the commercial, two hands wave the new models through the air, showcasing their flashy, updated features, set to “Thus Spoke Zarathustra” with an Apple twist: Justin Timberlake and Jimmy Fallon’s charming a cappella rendition of the famed musical number. »

- C. Molly Smith

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Brazil's Poverty Featured in Fauston da Silva's ‘My Friend Nietzsche': TheWrap's ShortList Quickie

26 August 2014 11:28 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Fáuston da Silva didn't need an expansive set budget to create the poor town he featured in his inspirational short film, “My Friend Nietzsche,” he only needed to look outside his window and shoot what was already there. The fifteen minute short follows a poor, young boy with lackluster reading skills, but an insatiable thirst for knowledge. When he literally stumbles across a copy of philosopher Frederick Nietzsche's iconic novel “Thus Spoke Zarathustra” while Richard Strauss’ classic (and identically titled) 1896 composition blasts in the background. The boy's curiosity is piqued. Watch The Wrap's ShortList Film Festival Finalists and Vote For Your Favorites The. »

- Travis Reilly

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Al Pacino’s Salomé and Wilde Salomé to screen at the BFI with special Q&A session

16 July 2014 7:12 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

From the press release:

Al Pacino’s Salomé and Wilde Salomé based on Oscar Wilde’s play, are to get a UK release as part of a very special event at BFI Southbank, London. The two films produced by Barry Navidi (The Merchant of Venice) and Robert Fox (The Hours), will be presented together on Sunday 21st September and followed by a Q&A with Academy Award winner Al Pacino that will be broadcast live via satellite to cinemas across the UK and Ireland. The unique event will be hosted by Stephen Fry.

Salomé is Oscar Wilde’s most controversial work, banned in London in the late 19th Century. This scintillating tale of lust, greed and revenge follows the legend of King Herod and his lust for his young stepdaughter, Salomé, and her sexual baiting of John the Baptist. Wilde’s adaptation has spawned multiple stage productions including an opera by Richard Strauss, »

- Luke Owen

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Listen to the Unused, Rejected Score for Stanley Kubrick's '2001: A Space Odyssey'

20 May 2014 6:00 PM, PDT | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

  2001: A Space Odyssey is a stunning, laconic view of space travel — which is why music plays such a critical role in the effectiveness of the picture. Director Stanley Kubrick used iconic classical music tracks to accompany his near-silent epic, but Johann Strauss II and the Vienna Philharmonic’s rendition of Richard Strauss tone poem weren’t Kubrick’s first choices for the picture. Early in the film’s production, Kubrick commissioned Dr. Strangelove collaborator Alex North to create the soundtrack for 2001. That composition is currently available online via Filmmaker Iq. The website advises: This theme music made its public debut in early 1993 as part of the Telarc compilation CD Hollywood’s Greatest Hits, Vol. 2, by Erich Kunzel and...

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- Alison Nastasi

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Listen to Alex North's Original, Rejected '2001: A Space Odyssey' Score

19 May 2014 11:46 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Today, FilmmakerIQ posted the following snippet of Alex North's original score for Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey. The score was ultimately rejected and, in the case of the film's opening title sequence, the score was replaced by Richard Strauss's "Also sprach Zarathustra" composed in 1896. There are a couple ways to look and listen to this piece, but I think the best is to consider just how much we're all likely to prefer Kubrick's decision on which music to go with, especially once you you consider the following interview snippet from an interview in which Michel Ciment noted, "You have abandoned original film music in your last three films." Kubrick's response: Exclude a pop music score from what I am about to say. However good our best film composers may be, they are not a Beethoven, a Mozart or a Brahms. Why use music which is less »

- Brad Brevet

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Davidson on the Secret Star of the Metropolitan Opera’s Arabella

4 April 2014 12:30 PM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

Richard Strauss’s opera Arabella is a work of virtuosic nostalgia. In July 1933, when Germany had already taken its first steps into the inferno, Strauss produced a glittering romance full of fancy balls, last waltzes, mistaken identities, and virginal kisses. With music that recalled his 1911 opera Rosenkavalier, set in the Vienna of half a century before that and centered on an ancient family well past its glory days, Arabella is a layer cake of wistfulness. The Metropolitan Opera has ladled out its own stock of memories. The late Otto Schenck’s production, a gilded cornucopia of wrought-iron balustrades, circular settees, chandeliers, and drapery, originated during the Reagan years and hasn’t been seen here since 2001. The deluxe, ahh-inducing décor is profoundly out of fashion at the Met, but in this piece it feels just right.Strauss in his ballroom-and-boudoir mode demands tenderness, humor, and delicacy, and conductor Philippe Auguin obliges, »

- Justin Davidson

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Stanley Kubrick: Studio Auteur

19 March 2014 5:07 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Throughout the 1960s-early 1970s, a combination of financial desperation, creative daring, and an adventurous movie-going public had produced a creative detonation in mainstream American movies not seen before or since.  Each year of the period seemed to bring at least one mightily ambitious visual experiment by a new contributor to the commercial movie scene, the “look” of that effort being as much a part of its identity as its characters and story.  One could pick no better representative of the trend than Stanley Kubrick, for no director of the time so extended the boundaries of mainstream commercial filmmaking, or what it meant to be a mainstream commercial filmmaker.

For the most part, Kubrick’s professional ascent was built on the taking of standard genres – the war story, science fiction tale, sword-and-sandal epic – and twisting them into shapes so singular that each Kubrick outing became an acknowledged one-of-a-kind classic.  Paths of Glory »

- Bill Mesce

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Q&A: David Lynch on Enlightenment, Zz Top and 'Yeezus'

25 February 2014 12:30 PM, PST | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

David Lynch knows exactly when he started transcendental meditation: "On July 1st, 1973, at about 11 am." Although Lynch is most famous as a director of delightfully twisted movies from Eraserhead to Inland Empire, he is also a painter, an actor (most recently on Louie), a coffee seller, and the founder of the David Lynch Foundation for Consciousness-Based Education and World Peace. The foundation is dedicated to spreading transcendental meditation (the practice developed by the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, who famously taught it to the Beatles)—particularly to groups at risk, such as the homeless, »

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The HeyUGuys Interview: Composer Henry Jackman talks Captain Phillips, Epic Themes & more

17 February 2014 3:29 AM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Last week we had the pleasure of chatting with film composer Henry Jackman, whose body of work stretches from Monsters vs. Aliens to apocalyptic comedy This is the End. More recently, the musician has completed work on upcoming Marvel movie Captain America: The Winter Soldier – and you can read what he had to say about that highly anticipated film here – but the focus of our chat was his work on Sony Pictures’ BAFTA winning / Oscar nominated Captain Phillips, for which the composer himself was BAFTA nominated.

Jackman goes into detail on why self-discipline was paramount for the project, in addition to scoring epic superhero themes and what happens to music which doesn’t make it into the film.If you haven’t already, you can click here for your chance to win a copy or click here to buy one!

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Was your approach to scoring Captain Phillips any different to your other projects, »

- Amon Warmann

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2014 TCM Classic Film Festival to Open with Gala Screening of Newly Restored Oklahoma!

13 February 2014 6:45 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) will open the 2014 edition of the TCM Classic Film Festival with the world premiere of a brand new restoration of the beloved Rodgers & Hammerstein musical Oklahoma! (1955). TCM’s own Robert Osborne, who serves as official host for the festival, will introduce Oklahoma!, with the film’s star, Academy Award®-winner Shirley Jones, in attendance. Vanity Fair will also return for the fifth year as a festival partner and co-presenter of the opening night after-party. Marking its fifth year, the TCM Classic Film Festival will take place April 10-13, 2014, in Hollywood. The gathering will coincide withTCM’s 20th anniversary as a leading authority in classic film.

In addition, the festival has added several high-profile guests to this year’s lineup, including Oscar®-winning director William Friedkin, who will attend for the screening of the U.S. premiere restoration of his suspenseful cult classic Sorcerer (1977); Kim Novak, who »

- Melissa Thompson

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Arts preview 2014: star turns

31 December 2013 11:00 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Angelina Jolie takes on Sleeping Beauty while Terry Gilliam tackles Berlioz as the stars come out to confound our expectations in the coming year

Film

Angelina Jolie in Maleficent

Hollywood's most formidable leading lady is back after a relatively quiet spell, in a role playing on her scariness and seniority. This reinvented fairytale is a twist on The Sleeping Beauty, and Jolie is not playing the insipid dormant heroine with her crybaby attitude to finger-pricking but the evilly magnificent Maleficent, the sorceress who casts a spell on the demure young Princess Aurora. How did she get that way? Everything will depend on the script – but Jolie is always a great turn. Peter Bradshaw 30 May.

Natalie Portman in Jane Got a Gun

Natalie Portman is a Hollywood A-lister who first came to prominence in George Lucas's Star Wars prequel trilogy. She was compellingly vulnerable in Darren Aronofsky's Black Swan, »

- Peter Bradshaw, Tim Jonze, Sean O'Hagan, Mark Lawson, Andrew Dickson, Lyn Gardner, Jonathan Jones, Adrian Searle, Tom Service, Andrew Clements

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Arts preview 2014: star turns

31 December 2013 11:00 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Angelina Jolie takes on Sleeping Beauty while Terry Gilliam tackles Berlioz as the stars come out to confound our expectations in the coming year

Film

Angelina Jolie in Maleficent

Hollywood's most formidable leading lady is back after a relatively quiet spell, in a role playing on her scariness and seniority. This reinvented fairytale is a twist on The Sleeping Beauty, and Jolie is not playing the insipid dormant heroine with her crybaby attitude to finger-pricking but the evilly magnificent Maleficent, the sorceress who casts a spell on the demure young Princess Aurora. How did she get that way? Everything will depend on the script – but Jolie is always a great turn. Peter Bradshaw 30 May.

Natalie Portman in Jane Got a Gun

Natalie Portman is a Hollywood A-lister who first came to prominence in George Lucas's Star Wars prequel trilogy. She was compellingly vulnerable in Darren Aronofsky's Black Swan, »

- Peter Bradshaw, Tim Jonze, Sean O'Hagan, Mark Lawson, Andrew Dickson, Lyn Gardner, Jonathan Jones, Adrian Searle, Tom Service, Andrew Clements

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

15 items from 2014


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