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Starship Troopers: 15 facts you never knew

Starship Troopers has now been in the world for twenty years. The film, which stars Casper Van Dien, Dina Meyer, Denise Richards and Neil Patrick Harris, is somewhat of a cult classic. Set in a future where mankind is at war with a race of giant bugs, and the only way to do pretty much anything is by becoming a citizen, it follows the tribulations of Johnny Rico (Van Dien), a young man who joins the Mobile Infantry. Ever wondered how the film was made? Who was first in line to play Johnny Rico? We have all this and more, just read below if you would like to know more. Check out our 15 Starship Troopers facts below.

Starship Troopers facts

1. Originally released in UK cinemas as a 15 certificate, the movie was upgraded to an 18 for the home entertainment release. The BBFC thought that upon further viewing, the film was far
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Dear Hollywood: 9 Top Women Cinematographers Who Are Ready to Direct

Dear Hollywood: 9 Top Women Cinematographers Who Are Ready to Direct
Here’s how studios say they see it: Sure, we really want to hire women directors. But there’s almost no studio movie that isn’t big budget, and we can’t find women who have the experience necessary to handle the really big movies. (Never mind Colin Trevorrow. Or Marc Webb. Or Gareth Edwards. Or Jon Watts.)

Of course, that logic is a vicious cycle at best, but here’s a chance to break it. Director Reed Morano’s dazzling execution of the first three episodes of Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s Tale” suggests another excellent source for future women directors: top cinematographers.

Read More: 7 Female Genre Filmmakers You Should Get to Know Right Now

Women cinematographers work harder, longer, and have to be gifted and tough in order to keep landing jobs. As a cinematographer, make one mistake and you’re through. Any working cinematographer has more than
See full article at Indiewire »

Dear Hollywood: 9 Top Women Cinematographers Who Are Ready to Direct

Dear Hollywood: 9 Top Women Cinematographers Who Are Ready to Direct
Here’s how studios say they see it: Sure, we really want to hire women directors. But there’s almost no studio movie that isn’t big budget, and we can’t find women who have the experience necessary to handle the really big movies. (Never mind Colin Trevorrow. Or Marc Webb. Or Gareth Edwards. Or Jon Watts.)

Of course, that logic is a vicious cycle at best, but here’s a chance to break it. Director Reed Morano’s dazzling execution of the first three episodes of Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s Tale” suggests another excellent source for future women directors: top cinematographers.

Read More: 7 Female Genre Filmmakers You Should Get to Know Right Now

Women cinematographers work harder, longer, and have to be gifted and tough in order to keep landing jobs. As a cinematographer, make one mistake and you’re through. Any working cinematographer has more than
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

80s fantasy movie moments that terrified us as kids

Ryan Lambie Mar 22, 2017

Fearsome monsters, grasping hands, and a suggestive tree. Here are 10 fantasy movie moments that scarred us as kids...

Sooner or later, you're going to see a scary movie. Whether you sneak down and watch a horror film on late night television, watch a Nightmare On Elm Street sequel round a friend's house or watch clips of slasher movies on YouTube, horror movies are always out there, waiting in the wings for the young and curious.

See related The Last Kingdom series 2 episode 1 review The Last Kingdom series 2: politics, battles and arselings What can we expect from new BBC drama, The Last Kingdom?

But long before most of us graduate to the stage of our lives where we start seeking out 18-rated movies of gore and terror, we reliably encounter scary moments in what might initially seem to be harmless family adventure films.

The 1980s was an
See full article at Den of Geek »

RoboCop: how its Pov shots make the film a classic

Ryan Lambie Mar 9, 2017

In RoboCop, we see death and resurrection through Murphy's eyes. Here's how its Pov sequences create such a timeless movie...

"Well, he signed a release form when he joined the force. He's legally dead. We can do pretty much what we want to him."

Articles probably ought to begin with a punchy, attention-grabbing argument, so here's one: RoboCop's an underrated film. As financially successful as it was, as oft-quoted it is by its legion fans,  and despite all the sequels, the TV spin-off and the 2014 reboot, the brilliance of its filmmaking is still easily overlooked. Why? Because RoboCop's writing, direction, acting and design all slip together so seamlessly that singling out exactly why the film works so well.

See related  James Cameron's Avatar: five years on Avatar review

RoboCop's often described in terms of its spectacularly bloody violence or its satirical humour -
See full article at Den of Geek »

Martin Scorsese’s Personal Message, Wim Wenders Mixtape, John Waters’ ‘Maniacs’ Restored, and More

Dailies is a round-up of essential film writing, news bits, videos, and other highlights from across the Internet. If you’d like to submit a piece for consideration, get in touch with us in the comments below or on Twitter at @TheFilmStage.

John Waters‘ restored Multiple Maniacs is coming to theaters this August, followed by a likely release on The Criterion Collection, Criterion Cast reports.

Martin Scorsese responds to a fan who made a montage of his films with those of Stanley Kubrick:

35 years after Das Boot, cinematographer Jost Vacano will receive over $500,000 for his work in a new court ruling, THR reports.

Jonathan Rosenbaum has re-published his piece on Alain ResnaisLast Year at Marienbad:

It’s too bad Last Year at Marienbad was the most fashionable art-house movie of 1961-’62, because as a result it’s been maligned and misunderstood ever since. The chic allure of
See full article at The Film Stage »

Hudson Hawk at 25

If there is a reliable truism that can coexist alongside the American film industry’s dance of death with economically insane budgets that now routinely soar north of $200 million, it is that (most) critics and potential ticket-buyers can be counted on to review bad buzz and publicized woes of dollars and production instead of the actual movie once it finally finds its way to a screen. And it may in fact be true that the drama behind the scenes often outstrips the quality of the wide-screen finished product, though certainly this is not always the case. The reception of big-budget box-office flops like John Carter, The Lone Ranger, Jupiter Ascending and Oliver Stone’s Alexander are but some late examples of our number-crunching obsession with pop culture minutiae and the fascination of a behemoth’s preordained fall. Most who trudged out to see any of these films during their theatrical
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Appetites: Surveying Paul Verhoeven

The Paul Verhoeven filmography screens at the Tiff Bell Lightbox through April 4th, culminating in a screening of his new “crowdsourced” film, Tricked.

Common wisdom dictates that cynicism and sentimentality are carefully linked, if not outright synonymous. In filmic terms, the most comfortable formulation of that argument is to align, for instance, romantic comedies with socially-acceptable (and, often, utterly noxious) notions of gender politics. Through the deployment of relationships and character profiles that support popular notions of how women and men behave, these movies are able to exploit comfortable mores in order to mainline easy pathos. What’s less common is to consider how that relationship between affect and effect can be subverted, perhaps because it’s relatively rare for truly subversive artists to be handed the proverbial keys to the kingdom.

Enter Paul Verhoeven. From his early Dutch features, including Turks Fruit (Turkish Delight) and Soldaat van Oranje (Soldier of Orange
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Camerimage unveils competition juries

  • ScreenDaily
Hunger Games DoP Tom Stern and 12 Years a Slave cinematographer Sean Bobbitt among those chosen for jury duty.

The 21st Camerimage, the International Film Festival of the Art of Cinematography (Nov 16-23), has revealed the competition jurors who will judge entries at this year’s event in Bydgoszcz, Poland.

Jury members of the main competition jury are:

Tom Stern, cinematographer (Million Dollar Baby, Gran Torino, The Hunger Games);Ed Lachman, cinematographer (Erin Brockovich, The Virgin Suicides, I’m Not There);Todd McCarthy, journalist and film critic;Denis Lenoir, cinematographer (Paris, je t’aime, Righteous Kill, 88 Minutes);Adam Holender, cinematographer (Midnight Cowboy, Smoke, Fresh);Timo Salminen, cinematographer (The Man Without a Past, La Havre, The Match Factory Girl);Franz Lustig, cinematographer (Don’t Come Knocking, Land of Plenty, Palermo Shooting);Jeffrey Kimball, cinematographer (Top Gun, Mission: Impossible II, The Expendables).Polish Films Competition

Jost Vacano, the cinematographer behind several Paul Verhoeven films including Total Recall, RoboCop and [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Camerimage Announces Competition Juries

Camerimage, the International Film Festival of the Art of Cinematography, has announced today its full jury roster for the upcoming festival, running November 16 to 23 in Bydgoszcz, Poland. The names include directors Jos Stelling and Albert Hughes, Oscar-nominated cinematographers Caleb Deschanel, Ed Lachman, Tom Stern, Stuart Dryburgh and Jost Vacano and many more. Jury members of the main competition jury are Oscar nominee Tom Stern, cinematographer ( Million Dollar Baby , Gran Torino , The Hunger Games ); Oscar nominee Ed Lachman, cinematographer ( Erin Brockovich , The Virgin Suicides , I.m Not There ); Todd McCarthy, journalist and film critic ( Visions of Light , Corman.s World: Exploits of a Hollywood Rebel ); Primetime Emmy nominee Denis Lenoir, cinematographer (...
See full article at Comingsoon.net »

Watch: David Lynch, Wachowskis, Martin Scorsese, Steven Soderbergh, Wally Pfister & More Discuss Filmmaking For ‘Side By Side’

  • The Film Stage
A must-see for any cinephile this year is Christopher Kenneally‘s documentary on digital vs. film, Side by Side. Led by Keanu Reeves, in our review we called it extraordinary, in that its not only required viewing for those interested in film, but also wonderfully entertaining. The documentary sees Reeves interview top Hollywood pioneers including James Cameron, George Lucas, Danny Boyle, Martin Scorsese, Christopher Nolan and as per usual in the genre, there was lots of left-over footage.

In a daily video series, Tribeca Films is releasing some extra clips from the films which featuring conversations that didn’t make the cut. There’s David Lynch discussing digital theatrical delivery, the Wachowskis on actors performances and editing, Martin Scorsese on celluloid, Wally Pfister on story, Steven Soderbergh on doing things different and much more. It’s great to hear the opinions of these tastemakers in Hollywood, including both sides of the coin.
See full article at The Film Stage »

The 10 greatest Rutger Hauer films that aren’t Blade Runner

From the 70s to the present, we look back through the sterling work of Rutger Hauer to bring you the actor’s 10 finest films that aren't Blade Runner...

For some, Dutch actor Rutger Hauer will forever be associated with a certain rooftop speech about tears in rain. But although his turn as doomed replicant Roy Batty in Blade Runner was a classic one, Hauer’s output before and since has been stunningly prolific. This list, therefore, is designed to highlight 10 of Hauer’s finest non-Blade Runner movies, with a particular emphasis on those that are lesser known – which is why we've gone for some older pictures rather than the more recent and mainstream, such as Batman Begins. And since this is Den of Geek, expect to find lots of action movies, horror, and low-budget sci-fi in the entries below.

One thing they all have in common, though, irrespective of
See full article at Den of Geek »

Paul Verhoeven: The "Starship Troopers" Hollywood Flashback Interview

Director Paul Verhoeven.

This is the first of two conversations I've had with director Paul Verhoeven, the second being for his Ww II drama "Black Book." When I met Verhoeven in the Sony Pictures commissary for lunch in October of 1997, I had been a fan of his work since seeing the classic "Soldier of Orange" in 1979. The manic energy that Verhoeven is renowned for was evident throughout our chat, and was infectious. By the time our all-too-brief lunch was over, I found myself waving my hands while I spoke in rapid clips, and using more bounce than usual in my stride, to the point where a few friends suggested I switch to decaf.

The other memory that remains vivid is the passion and high hopes that Verhoeven had for "Starship Troopers." Like the director himself, I thought this would be a groundbreaking movie event and that the world would embrace
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Hit Me With Your Best Shot: Showgirls

The concept of this series is such: I choose a movie. We all choose our favorite shot(s) from said movie. I link up to everyone's choices each Wednesday. It's an eye candy free for all celebrating those single images in movies that we just can't live without. They're either the prettiest, the most telling, personally resonant, quite unexpected or just plain delightful.

Today's episode: Paul Verhoeven's gaudy masterwork Showgirls (1995). It's loud. It's trashy. It's colorful. It's spectacularly itself. Something all movies should strive to be. So, very briefly, I considered this shot from the opening sequence.

Because the "Huge" graphic makes me giggle. It can't have been an accident that that's the word that flashes in neon just as Nomi Malone (Elizabeth Berkley) pulls into Las Vegas. "I'm gonna win."

I almost went with anything from Nomi's first performance like these.

I love how distorted and fleshy the
See full article at FilmExperience »

'Das Boot' lenser wins early legal victory

'Das Boot' lenser wins early legal victory
Cologne, Germany -- Cinematographer Jost Vacano ("Starship Troopers") has won a key legal victory in his legal battle to secure residuals for his work on Wolfgang Petersen's 1981 boxoffice hit "Das Boot."

Vacano was paid DM180,000 (around $114,000) for his lensing of the anti-war classic. The film won an Oscar for best foreign language film and Vacano's camerawork picked up an Academy Award nomination. "Das Boot" has earned an estimated $100 million at the boxoffice world-wide and substantially more on home video and DVD.

A German court of appeals has upheld a lower court ruling supporting Vacano in his efforts to find out how much producers Bavaria and public network Wdr have made from "Das Boot" since 2002. The court ruled the producers have to open their books. Only then can Vacano try and prove he is owed further compensation.

The court, however, said Vacano does not have a right to information about
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

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