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Mark Frost on ‘Twin Peaks,’ Realistic Endings, and David Lynch’s Consciousness

The return to Twin Peaks did not begin with this summer’s third, possibly final season of David Lynch and Mark Frost’s medium-shaking television project — despite what almost everything, from general public perception to the kind-of-sort-of-but-not-really subtitle, would have you believe — but through last year’s The Secret History of Twin Peaks, a visually dense, textually opaque epistolary novel penned by Frost. Though initially perplexing in scope (it begins with Lewis and Clark, folds the likes of Richard Nixon and L. Rob Hubbard into the Peaks mythos, and only hits the original series’ events at book’s end), it proved a more-or-less-perfect tee-up: plenty was said, seemingly nothing revealed — perhaps the most notable exception being the existence of Agent Tamara Preston, played in the new series by Chrysta Bell — and its tethers to events we’d eventually follow (or at least observe) week after week proved, in hindsight, rather deep.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Rushes. Wes Anderson's "Isle of Dogs", Stan Brakhage, Charting "Twin Peaks"

  • MUBI
Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.Recommended VIEWINGWes Anderson's latest experimentation in stop-motion, Isle of Dogs, gets its disturbing yet droll first trailer.Valentine, above, is a selection of intimate videos directed by Paul Thomas Anderson of Haim's live sessions of cuts from their latest album, Something to Tell You.We adore Taiwanese director Hou Hsiao-hsien's most recent film, The Assassin, and highly anticipate this new restoration for his difficult to see 1987 film drama, Daughter of the Nile. Grasshopper Film has bravely made Jean-Marie Straub's 2-minute masterpiece The Algerian War! available for free on their website.Recommended Reading"I began thinking that Mothlight must begin with the unraveling of a cocoon and end with some simulation of candle flame or electric heat (as all moths whose wings were being used in the film had been collected from enclosed
See full article at MUBI »

‘Twin Peaks: The Return’: Even David Lynch’s Cinematographer Can’t Explain What It All Means

  • Indiewire
‘Twin Peaks: The Return’: Even David Lynch’s Cinematographer Can’t Explain What It All Means
Peter Deming is at a slight disadvantage when talking about “Twin Peaks: The Return” compared to most other cinematographers discussing their latest work. He’s only familiar with the project as one long feature film, having gone into production with a 500-plus page script that didn’t have episode breaks, rather than the 18 episodes that Showtime aired this year.

“We also shot it like a feature film,” said Deming in an interview with IndieWire. “When you went to a location, you shot all the action that took place at that location. It’s different than TV – there’s no episode scripts, there’s one director, there’s one crew. So we broke it down and scheduled it like a feature film.”

This “block shooting” approach is impossible for most television shows, which are still being written when production begins on the first episode of the season. It’s a far more efficient approach,
See full article at Indiewire »

"Twin Peaks," Episode 13 Recap: What Is This, Kindergarten?

  • MUBI
Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.Much of David Lynch's work is about regression, or regressiveness, about people who are most comfortable when indulging (really, hiding behind) their baser instincts. An acid-jazz saxophonist with murder on his mind might take refuge in the body and soul of a teenage delinquent (Lost Highway), or a midwestern girl who has played and lost the Hollywood game might concoct a candy-colored dream-life in which she finally attains Tinseltown stardom (Mulholland Dr.). But these escapes always prove to be traps, and cyclical ones at that. What goes around comes around. What has happened before will happen again. Even Blue Velvet's Dorothy Vallens (Isabella Rossellini), finally liberated from her abusive sexual relationship with Frank Booth (Dennis Hopper), "still can see blue velvet through my tears.
See full article at MUBI »

"Twin Peaks," Episode 10 Recap: True Men

  • MUBI
Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.It's worth quoting the latest (perhaps the last?) gnomic pronouncements from Margaret "The Log Lady" Lanterman (the late Catherine E. Coulson), speaking via phone to Deputy Sheriff Tommy "Hawk" Hill (Michael Horse), in full: "Hawk—electricity is humming. You hear it in the mountains and rivers. You see it dance among the seas and stars. And glowing around the moon. But in these days, the glow is dying. What will be in the darkness that remains? The Truman brothers are both true men. They are your brothers. And the others, the good ones, who have been with you. Now the circle is almost complete. Watch and listen to the dream of time and space. It all comes out now, flowing like a river. That which is and is not.
See full article at MUBI »

"Twin Peaks," Episode 9 Recap: Whatever This Is

  • MUBI
Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.There's a brief, very beautiful moment in Part 7 of the new Twin Peaks, during the scene in which hotelier Benjamin Horne (Richard Beymer) and his secretary Beverly Paige (Ashley Judd) are investigating a strange sound emanating from the walls of the Great Northern. Ben points in the direction that he thinks the soft, soothing tone is coming from, and for a second he seems to be pointing right at the camera—past it, really…toward our world, at those of us on the other side of the fiction/fact divide. A blink-and-you'll-miss-it breach, but it lays some subtle groundwork for what follows: The aesthetically and thematically provocative Part 8 fitted the Twin Peaks mythos into our very real history of atomic destruction. And this week's
See full article at MUBI »

New Mutants Begins Shooting, First Photo Reveals 90s-Themed Working Title

  • MovieWeb
New Mutants Begins Shooting, First Photo Reveals 90s-Themed Working Title
Back in May, director Josh Boone announced that The New Mutants begins shooting in July, although he didn't offer an exact date for the production start. As it turns out, that date is today, July 10, with the filmmaker taking to social media to reveal that production has kicked off. He also shared the first photo from set, a humorous gag gift, given to him by his director of photography on the film, Peter Deming. Here's what Josh Boone had to say about this slate on his Instagram post from yesterday.

"Gag gift from @peter_deming We start shooting tomorrow! Wish us luck! #newmutants #xmen"

The "gag gift" in question, which you can see below from Josh Boone's Instagram, is a new film slate, except, instead of showcasing The New Mutants logo, it featured an altered logo from the 1980s sitcom Growing Pains, with an X placed within the O,
See full article at MovieWeb »

"Twin Peaks," Episode 5 Recap: I Love How You Love Me

  • MUBI
Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.The key image in Part 5 of the revived Twin Peaks is of a woman in ecstasy. Recall, however, the subtitle that series co-creator/director David Lynch appended to his thorny 2006 masterpiece Inland Empire: "A Woman in Trouble." The line separating rapture and anguish is a blurry one, especially for Lynch's ladies, who are as likely to end up exquisitely chiseled corpses (the ubiquitous Laura Palmer; Part 2's doomed henchwoman Darya) as they are world-weary survivors. For the moment, let's focus on Rebecca "Becky" Burnett (Amanda Seyfried), daughter of Rr Diner waitress Shelly Johnson (Mädchen Amick), though Becky's last name—taken from ne'er-do-well husband Steven Burnett (Caleb Landry Jones)—obscures the identity of her father. (Dana Ashbrook's now-law-abiding Bobby Briggs is the most likely candidate,
See full article at MUBI »

"Twin Peaks," Episodes 1 & 2 Recap: Do Not Drop Up

  • MUBI
Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.The world's gone mad. Fortunately for FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan), he's been able to sit out most of the real-life insanity of the last 25 years. Unfortunately—as surely known by those viewers familiar with Mark Frost and David Lynch's singular television series Twin Peaks, which returned Sunday, May 21st for a limited, 18-episode run on Showtime—that's because he's been trapped in the unearthly purgatory known as the Black Lodge, all while his devilish doppelgänger, a mortal manifestation of the murderous spirit known as Killer Bob, runs amok among mankind.Already it feels like I'm speaking in tongues. But if Twin Peaks and Lynch (who directed, co-wrote, co-edited, and designed the sound for all of these new episodes) have taught us anything,
See full article at MUBI »

‘Twin Peaks’ Season 3 Premiere Review: David Lynch Remains a Master — But The Brutality Toward Women Feels Dated

‘Twin Peaks’ Season 3 Premiere Review: David Lynch Remains a Master — But The Brutality Toward Women Feels Dated
[Editor’s note: The first page of this review will be spoiler-free for the first two episodes of “Twin Peaks,” Season 3. The second page will not be. Proceed accordingly.]

Twin Peaks” is a show that’s hard to explain in any direct fashion; often it lends itself more easily to metaphor. Let’s try this one: Imagine the pieces of a puzzle, scattered across a tabletop. You pick up each piece, and you understand what’s on it: a tree, a flower, a cloud. You start to assemble it — and you like puzzles, so you’re having a good time. But then you come across a piece with a microchip on it. Another piece with a quote from the Bhagavad Gita. A piece that doesn’t have any parts that interlock with others.

Piece by piece, they’re all so interesting — so if you’re the type of person who can appreciate minutiae without worrying about the big picture, you’ll be fine. If you demand completion, if you’re going to be driven crazy by the fact that
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Twin Peaks’ Season 3 Premiere Review: David Lynch Remains a Master — But The Brutality Toward Women Feels Dated

  • Indiewire
‘Twin Peaks’ Season 3 Premiere Review: David Lynch Remains a Master — But The Brutality Toward Women Feels Dated
[Editor’s note: The first page of this review will be spoiler-free for the first two episodes of “Twin Peaks,” Season 3. The second page will not be. Proceed accordingly.]

Twin Peaks” is a show that’s hard to explain in any direct fashion; often it lends itself more easily to metaphor. Let’s try this one: Imagine the pieces of a puzzle, scattered across a tabletop. You pick up each piece, and you understand what’s on it: a tree, a flower, a cloud. You start to assemble it — and you like puzzles, so you’re having a good time. But then you come across a piece with a microchip on it. Another piece with a quote from the Bhagavad Gita. A piece that doesn’t have any parts that interlock with others.

Piece by piece, they’re all so interesting — so if you’re the type of person who can appreciate minutiae without worrying about the big picture, you’ll be fine. If you demand completion, if you’re going to be driven crazy by the fact that
See full article at Indiewire »

Podcast Preview: This Week’s New Shows

Plus: trailers galore and perfect shots.

Now in its third week, our One Perfect Pod channel is bigger than ever. In addition to our regular programs, Fsr boss Neil Miller has been cranking out Emergency Podcasts to cover all the late-breaking big news, so if you’re not already, be sure to follow us on Twitter so you can be sure you won’t miss a minute of the good stuff. As for our regularly scheduled programming, there are some great things happening this week. Check it out:

On After the Credits, host and Fsr Columnist Matthew Monagle will be joined once again by Fsr film critic Rob Hunter, this time to discuss last week’s biggest release, Ghost in the Shell, starring white person Scarlett Johansson.

Then, over on Shot by Shot, the official cinematography podcast of One Perfect Shot, yours truly and Ops founder Geoff Todd are going to be discussing our favorite frames from
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

‘Now You See Me 2’ Is an ‘Excruciating,’ ‘Brain-Dead’ Sequel, Critics Say

  • The Wrap
‘Now You See Me 2’ Is an ‘Excruciating,’ ‘Brain-Dead’ Sequel, Critics Say
Now You See Me 2” is the latest summer movie to succumb to sequelitis. The film currently holds a score of 38 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, with critics calling the follow-up to 2013 cinema caper “preposterous,” “excruciating,” and a “brain-dead sequel.” “To keep the entire enterprise from floating away, cinematographer Peter Deming (‘Mulholland Drive,’ the upcoming ‘Twin Peaks’ revival) positions most of the onscreen bodies in as much detailed darkness as possible, the better to minimize the utter ridiculousness of their actions,” wrote TheWrap’s film critic Dave White in a review entitled, “‘Now You See Me 2’ Review: Daniel Radcliffe and Company.
See full article at The Wrap »

Film Review: ‘Now You See Me 2’

Film Review: ‘Now You See Me 2’
Now You See Me 2” is the kind of sequel that has all but gone out of fashion: a follow-up to a blockbuster so flaky and off-center that even those who made the original probably never expected it to spawn a second chapter. The new film is an even wilder lark—a madly spinning top of a movie, powered by an eagerness to please that somehow comes off as more innocent than calculated. The film knows that it’s playing you, and in almost every scene invites the audience to embrace the fact that it’s being played. It now feels downright retro, and maybe even a little exotic — in a good way — to encounter a sequel that isn’t all about setting up a five-year plan of franchise plot points. “Now You See Me 2” is more like a giddy piece of cheese from the ’80s, a chance to
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Mulholland Dr.

Ambiguous Ave.?  Bizarro Blvd.?  David Lynch's major mystery movie is back looking better than ever in a 4K transfer. Criterion's presentation accompanies it with a stack of interesting interviews with Lynch, Naomi Watts, Laura Herring plus other actors and crew people. The movie began, it seems, as sort of a non-spinoff spinoff of Twin Peaks. Mulholland Dr. Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 779 2001 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 146 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date October 27, 2015 / 39.95 Starring Justin Theroux, Naomi Watts, Laura Harring, Ann Miller, Scott Wulff, Robert Forster, Brent Briscoe, Maya Bond, Patrick Fischler, Michael Cooke, Bonnie Aarons, Lee Grant, Chad Everett, James Karen, Dan Hedaya, Monty Montgomery, Rebekah Del Rio. Cinematography Peter Deming Production Designer Jack Fisk Film Editor Mary Sweeney Original Music Angelo Badalamenti Written by David Lynch Produced by Neal Edelstein, Tony Krantz, Michael Polaire, Alain Sarde, Mary Sweeney Directed by David Lynch

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Time alters everything,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

October 27th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Army Of Darkness, The Gift, The Fifth Element

  • DailyDead
Hope everyone has their boomsticks ready, as this final week of October is looking to be yet another banner week for genre Blu-ray and DVD releases, highlighted by the anticipated Collector’s Edition set for Sam Raimi’s cult classic Army of Darkness from Scream Factory. The recent thriller, The Gift, is also making its way to multiple formats on October 27th and for those of you fans of The Fifth Element out there, Sony is putting together a nifty Cinema Series release that arrives this Tuesday.

Olive Films is also keeping themselves busy this week with several cult classic releases including Breeders, Sometimes They Come Back, Dr. Terror's House of Horror and Saul BassPhase IV, with Warner Home Video resurrecting several classics in HD as well—The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, Son of Kong, Them! and the Special Effects Collection box set.

Other notable titles coming out on
See full article at DailyDead »

The Criterion Collection announces October Blu-ray releases

Blu-ray distributors The Criterion Collection have announced its line-up for its October releases, which once again include some of cinema’s finest actors, directors and creators. David Lynch’s Mulholland Drive, Gus Van Sant’s My Own Private Idaho and David Cronenberg’s The Brood are amongst the latest list of films to get the Criterion touch.

You can view all the Blu-ray details and artwork below…

My Own Private Idaho

River Phoenix and Keanu Reeves star in this haunting tale from Gus Van Sant, about two young street hustlers: Mike Waters, a sensitive narco­leptic who dreams of the mother who abandoned him, and Scott Favor, the wayward son of the mayor of Portland and the object of Mike’s desire. Navigating a volatile world of junkies, thieves, and johns, Mike takes Scott on a quest along the grungy streets and open highways of the Pacific Northwest, in search
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Blu-ray Review: Scarecrows

  • DailyDead
A film that I somehow missed while growing up, Scarecrows is a bit of an oddity in comparison to the rest of the ’80s horror genre landscape. Not a slasher movie nor a traditional monster movie, William Wesley’s directorial debut is part caper-gone-awry/part paranoia-fueled thriller and does a nice job of creating a palpable sense of tension even while contending with the constraints of a minuscule budget. It also ups the creep-out factor with some strikingly cool killer scarecrow designs and features some of the most incredible nighttime cinematography, as well. Scarecrows may be one of the more overlooked cult classics from the ’80s, but thankfully Scream Factory is here to finally show this deserving film some love with a great new Blu-ray release.

Scarecrows digs right into its story, picking up with an elite group of thieves as they’re escaping on a hijacked plane with their loot in tow.
See full article at DailyDead »

Scarecrows | Blu-ray Review

  • ioncinema
At the top of a definite genre shortlist is William Wesley’s 1988 title Scarecrows, a little horror flick about the eponymous objects used to frighten birds away from crops. Unfortunately, to use a cheap analogy, their use as frightful entities on film is parallel to their safeguarding of crops, effective only to the cognitive capabilities of smaller creatures. While Wesley maintains an effective command of ambience throughout this nocturnal jaunt through the vegetation, a bounty of budgetary restraints, strained performances and belabored writing seemingly brought on by a limited concept mark the film as fodder for the Mystery Science Theater 3000 experience.

A band of ex-military criminals heist the Camp Pendleton payroll, take a pilot and his daughter hostage, and make a mad dash through Mexico. However, one of their crew members double crosses them, attempting to murder his cohorts and escape with all the money for himself. This leads
See full article at ioncinema »
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