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Icg President Steven Poster Pushes On-Set Safety, Slams Government’s Anti-Union Stance

Cinematographer Steven Poster, who’s shot such films as “Donnie Darko” and “Stuart Little 2,” and is a former president of the Americans Society of Cinematographers, has been head of the International Cinematographers Guild, Local 600, since 2006. He sat with Variety to assess the state of the organization at this point in its history (good) and anti-union trends at the national level (bad). The organization, he says, continues the fight against the view, in some quarters, that labor is just another commodity.

How many Camerimage festivals have you been to now?

This is my fifth. I’m serving on the student competition jury and hosting the screening of the Icg Emerging Cinematographer Awards. We showcase those films here and around the U.S. every year. I’m amazed at their quality. It just keeps getting better.

How is Icg going as a union?

Membership is growing. The motion picture and television industry is the most unionized of all
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Criterion Reflections – Episode 5 – Summer 1969 Part 2

  • CriterionCast
Criterion Reflections is David Blakeslee’s ongoing project to watch all of the films included in the Criterion Collection in chronological order of their original release. Each episode features panel conversations and 1:1 interviews offering insights on movies that premiered in a particular season of a year in the past, which were destined to eventually bear the Criterion imprint. In this episode, David is joined by Jon Laubinger, Jordan Essoe and William Remmers to discuss four titles from the Summer of 1969: Haskell Wexler’s Medium Cool, Alberto Isaac’s The Olympics in Mexico, Federico Fellini’s Fellini Satyricon, and Agnes Varda’s Lions Love (…and Lies).

Episode Time Markers Introduction: 0:00:00 – 0:06:31 Medium Cool: 0:06:32 – 0:53:26 The Olympics in Mexico: 0:53:27 – 1:28:29 Fellini Satyricon: 1:28:30 – 2:20:24 Lions Love (and Lies…): 2:20:25 – 3:19:15 Medium Cool (8/27/69)

Criterion
See full article at CriterionCast »

No Matter How Well Made, Bigelow Depiction of Detroit Rebellion Both Condescending and Self-Serving

No Matter How Well Made, Bigelow Depiction of Detroit Rebellion Both Condescending and Self-Serving
Detroit movie street riot scene: The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty director Kathryn Bigelow tackles the 1967 Detroit riots in “horribly real” and “deeply self-serving” 2017 release marketed as a “dramatic thriller.” Kathryn Bigelow's 'Detroit' movie: Horribly real semidocumentary or self-serving Hollywood depiction of 1967 Detroit Rebellion? In the city of Detroit, from July 23 through July 27 of 1967, the people rebelled against the conditions of their existence. Some call this the 1967 Detroit Riot; it's also known as the 12th Street Riot and the 1967 Detroit Rebellion. I prefer the latter. During the rebellion, 43 people died – 33 of whom were black, 10 were white. Twenty-four of the black victims were shot by police officers and National Guardsmen, while six were shot by store owners or security guards. Three of those killings are the subject of Academy Award-winning director Kathryn Bigelow, her itinerant The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty scenario writer Mark Boal (who also wrote Paul Haggis' In the Valley of Elah), and
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Recommended Films in Times of Madness: Singing Kidnappers and Dancing Puerto Ricans Will Make You Forget Ballistic Missiles

Recommended Films in Times of Madness: Singing Kidnappers and Dancing Puerto Ricans Will Make You Forget Ballistic Missiles
Fourth of July movies: A few recommended titles that should help you temporarily escape current global madness Two thousand and seventeen has been a weirder-than-usual year on the already pretty weird Planet Earth. Unsurprisingly, this Fourth of July, the day the United States celebrates its Declaration of Independence from the British Empire, has been an unusual one as well. Instead of fireworks, (at least some) people's attention has been turned to missiles – more specifically, a carefully timed North Korean intercontinental ballistic missile test indicating that Kim Jong-un could theoretically gain (or could already have?) the capacity to strike North America with nuclear weapons. Then there were right-wing trolls & history-deficient Twitter users berating National Public Radio for tweeting the Declaration of Independence, 140 characters at a time. Besides, a few days ago the current U.S. president retweeted a video of himself body-slamming and choking a representation of CNN – courtesy of a gif originally created by a far-right Internet
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Carol Burnett, Marshall Herskovitz, Edward Zwick to Receive AFI Honorary Doctorates

Carol Burnett, Marshall Herskovitz, Edward Zwick to Receive AFI Honorary Doctorates
The American Film Institute will confer honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts degrees on Carol Burnett, Marshall Herskovitz, and Edward Zwick at its commencement ceremony on June 5 at the Tcl Chinese Theatre.

Herskovitz and Zwick are graduates of the AFI Class of 1975. The date of AFI’s commencement exercises marks the 50th anniversary of the American Film Institute’s formation in 1967. AFI noted Tuesday that 2017 also marks the 50th anniversary of “The Carol Burnett Show.”

Past recipients include Robert Altman, Maya Angelou, Saul Bass, Kathryn Bigelow, Mel Brooks, Anne V. Coates, Clint Eastwood, Roger Ebert, Nora Ephron, James Earl Jones, Lawrence Kasdan, Jeffrey Katzenberg, Kathleen Kennedy, Angela Lansbury, John Lasseter, Spike Lee, David Lynch, Helen Mirren, Rita Moreno, Quentin Tarantino, Robert Towne, Cicely Tyson, Haskell Wexler, and John Williams.

Burnett has received six Emmy Awards, five Golden Globe Awards and the 2016 Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award.

Herskovitz won four Primetime Emmy Awards.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Loved One / Broken Arrow

The Loved One

Blu-ray

Warner Archives

1965 / B&W / 1:85 / / 122 min. / Street Date May 9, 2017

Starring: Robert Morse, Jonathan Winters, Anjanette Comer.

Cinematography: Haskell Wexler

Film Editor: Hal Ashby, Brian Smedley-Aston

Written by Terry Southern, Christopher Isherwood

Produced by Martin Ransohoff (uncredited), John Calley, Haskell Wexler

Directed by Tony Richardson

Funeral Director: Before you go, I was just wondering… would you be interested in some extras for the loved one?

Next Of Kin: What kind of extras?

Funeral Director: Well, how about a casket?

Mike Nichols and Elaine May – The $65 Dollar Funeral

That routine, a classic example of what was known in the early 60’s as “sick humor”, was nevertheless ubiquitous across mainstream variety shows like Ed Sullivan and Jack Paar. It also popularized the notion of a new boutique industry, the vanity funeral. The novelist Evelyn Waugh, decidedly less mainstream, documented the beginning of that phenomenon over a decade earlier with The Loved One,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Podcast Preview

Vertigo,’ ‘Free Fire,’ and Much, Much More

This week on the One Perfect Podcast Channel we have a score of great shows coming up.

First off, Matthew Monagle is joined by critic Tomris Laffly to discuss — what else? — Ben Wheatley’s Free Fire starring Brie Larson, Armie Hammer, and Cillian Murphy. If you don’t know the format, Monagle and his guest discuss the film both before and after seeing it, weighing expectations against reality. The result is a review show unlike every other, and one you have to check it out.

Then on Shot by Shot, the cinematography podcast hosted by myself and One Perfect Shot creator Geoff Todd, we’re talking about a film many consider to be the greatest ever made, Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo, which was shot by the Master of Suspense’s favorite Dp, the great Robert Burks.

Then there’s Neil Miller’s The Big Idea, the
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

‘In the Heat of the Night’ Turns 50: Why This Police Classic Still Thrills — TCM Fest

  • Indiewire
‘In the Heat of the Night’ Turns 50: Why This Police Classic Still Thrills — TCM Fest
Ever wonder why “In the Heat of the Night” beat “The Graduate” and “Bonnie and Clyde” for Best Picture Oscar in 1968? Well, as Bobby Kennedy told director Norman Jewison when he presented the movie with the New York Film Critics Award, “Norman, timing is everything.”

It’s hard to believe that the movie came out 50 years ago. Sidney Poitier and Rod Steiger lit up the screen in the racially-charged murder mystery that not only captured the Civil Rights zeitgeist but also delivered a damn good drama. On April 6, the TCM Classic Film Festival celebrates that anniversary with a gala opening night screening at the Chinese Theatre IMAX on Hollywood Boulevard, attended by Jewison, Poitier, producer Walter Mirisch, Lee Grant, and composer Quincy Jones.

Considered an underdog that year, “Heat” took home five Oscars, including Best Actor for Steiger, Stirling Siliphant’s Best Adapted Screenplay, Hal Ashby’s Editing, and Sound Mixing.
See full article at Indiewire »

Will Michael Shannon Join ‘Deadpool 2’ as Cable?

I really, really hope so.

It isn’t official yet so take this news with a grain of salt, but according to Variety, Michael Shannon (Man of Steel, Midnight Special) is Fox’s top choice to play the character Cable in Deadpool 2. Previously Pierce Brosnan had been rumored to be in the mix, but according to the report, Shannon is the studio’s “top choice.”

For those who don’t know, Cable is Nathan Summers, the future child of Scott Summers, a.k.a. Cyclops, and Jean Grey, a.k.a. Marvel Girl? Phoenix? She’s got a lot of secret identities. In the comics, he comes from the future to lead the New Mutants/X-Force, and he’s an all-around badass: cybernetic arm, cybernetic eye, a penchant for cigars, big shiny guns, and a hatred of guff, in that he doesn’t take any. Attitude-wise, he’s like a cross between Wolverine and Sgt. Slaughter:
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Film / Notfilm

An experimental film by an Irish playwright, shot in New York with a silent comedian at the twilight of his career? Samuel Beckett’s inquiry into the nature of movies (and existence?) befuddled viewers not versed in film theory; Ross Lipman’s retrospective documentary about its making asks all the questions and gets some good answers.

First there’s the film itself, called just Film from 1965. By that year our high school textbooks had already enshrined Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot as a key item for introducing kids to modern theater, existentialism, etc. … the California school system was pretty progressive in those days. But Beckett had a yen to say something in the film medium, and his publisher Barney Rosset helped him put a movie together. The Milestone Cinematheque presents the UCLA Film & Television Archive’s restoration of Film on its own disc, accompanied by a videotaped TV production
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Witness the Evolution of Cinematography with Compilation of Oscar Winners

This past weekend, the American Society of Cinematographers awarded Greig Fraser for his contribution to Lion as last year’s greatest accomplishment in the field. Of course, his achievement was just a small sampling of the fantastic work from directors of photography, but it did give us a stronger hint at what may be the winner on Oscar night. Ahead of the ceremony, we have a new video compilation that honors all the past winners in the category at the Academy Awards

Created by Burger Fiction, it spans the stunning silent landmark Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans all the way up to the end of Emmanuel Lubezki‘s three-peat win for The Revenant. Aside from the advancements in color and aspect ration, it’s a thrill to see some of cinema’s most iconic shots side-by-side. However, the best way to experience the evolution of the craft is by
See full article at The Film Stage »

ASC Awards 2017: ‘Lion’ Steals ‘La La Land’s’ Thunder

  • Indiewire
ASC Awards 2017: ‘Lion’ Steals ‘La La Land’s’ Thunder
While Damien Chazelle predictably took the DGA Award for “La La Land” on Saturday night, the ASC rejected the self-reverential Hollywood musical in favor of the more dramatic and politically impactful “Lion,” honoring Australian cinematographer Greig Fraser. “Lion” director Garth Davis took home Best First Director at the DGAs.

However, “La La Land’s” cinematographer, Linus Sandgren, still remains the Oscar favorite, despite the fact that, in the last 20 years, the ASC winner has taken the Academy Award 11 times.

With “Lion,” the incredibly true story of Saroo Brierley (Dev Patel), the Indian who used Google Earth to locate his birth family several decades after his separation and adoption in Australia, Fraser essentially made two movies in one. Fortunately, the top Camerimage prize winner had previous experience shooting in India.

“Trying to capture the essence of India is almost like trying to bottle magic, which is hard to do because India
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Lion,’ ‘Game of Thrones,’ ‘Mr. Robot’ Win ASC Awards

‘Lion,’ ‘Game of Thrones,’ ‘Mr. Robot’ Win ASC Awards
Lion” lenser Greig Fraser walked away with top honors in the feature film category at the 31st annual American Society of Cinematographers Awards Saturday night. Fraser also won the Golden Frog at last year’s Camerimage cinematography festival.

Other nominees in the field were James Laxton (“Moonlight”), Rodrigo Prieto (“Silence”), Linus Sandgren (“La La Land”) and Bradford Young (“Arrival”). Each of the Asc feature nominees were also nominated by the Academy this year.

In the Asc’s TV categories, “Game of Thrones” and “Mr. Robot” came out victorious, while HBO’s “The Night Of” won in the miniseries/pilot category.

“House of Others” Dp Gorgka Gomez Andreu won the third annual Spotlight award, which recognizes feature-length projects that are screened at festivals, internationally, or in limited theatrical release.

Denzel Washington and cinematographers Edward Lachman, Philippe Rousselot, Bill Garcia and Nancy Schreiber won honorary awards.

Last year’s Asc and Oscar
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Lion,’ ‘Game of Thrones,’ ‘Mr. Robot’ Win Asc Awards

Lion” lenser Greig Fraser walked away with top honors in the feature film category at the 31st annual American Society of Cinematographers Awards Saturday night. Fraser also won the Golden Frog at last year’s Camerimage cinematography festival.

Other nominees in the field were James Laxton (“Moonlight”), Rodrigo Prieto (“Silence”), Linus Sandgren (“La La Land”) and Bradford Young (“Arrival”). Each of the Asc feature nominees were also nominated by the Academy this year.

In the Asc’s TV categories, “Game of Thrones” and “Mr. Robot” came out victorious, while HBO’s “The Night Of” won in the miniseries/pilot category.

“House of Others” Dp Gorgka Gomez Andreu won the third annual Spotlight award, which recognizes feature-length projects that are screened at festivals, internationally, or in limited theatrical release.

Denzel Washington and cinematographers Edward Lachman, Philippe Rousselot, Bill Garcia and Nancy Schreiber won honorary awards.

Last year’s Asc and Oscar winner for cinematography was Emmanuel Lubezki for
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Trial Of Haskell Wexler: Before His Death, The Great Cinematographer Stood Accused By His Union

  • Deadline
The Trial Of Haskell Wexler: Before His Death, The Great Cinematographer Stood Accused By His Union
Haskell Wexler, the two-time Oscar-winning cinematographer, fought for the rights of working men and women his entire life. But before he died last December, he was brought up on charges by his own union in the last big fight of his life – for safety on the set. This is the untold story of a Hollywood legend's battle against the union he loved to make the industry a safer place to work. "Brother Wexler," the letter from the Cinematographers Guild began. "You are hereby…
See full article at Deadline »

‘Network’ Turns 40: Here Are 3 Ways It Changed How We Understand News Media

  • Indiewire
‘Network’ Turns 40: Here Are 3 Ways It Changed How We Understand News Media
Because 2016 cares not for subtlety, this month marks the 40th anniversary of “Network.” Since its release in November 1976 to wide praise and an eventual heap of Oscars, director Sidney Lumet and writer Paddy Chayefsky’s excoriation of the exponentially money-driven, bottom-feeding tendencies of television news has only grown in renown, as each angry pundit updates the film’s library of prophecies about The State of Television Today.

With the ascent of an actual reality TV star to the U.S. Presidency following a broadcast news cycle that worked for everything but a dedication to public interest, it would seem that this depressing political season has reached the logical end of the film’s apocalyptic forecast, landing on a reality too absurd for even “Network” to dramatize: Howard Beale as President. However, as we reflect on what’s gone wrong with contemporary news media and political culture, it’s important to
See full article at Indiewire »

Warren Beatty Talks Hollywood Legends, Humanizing Howard Hughes and More in Career-Spanning IndieWire Interview

Warren Beatty Talks Hollywood Legends, Humanizing Howard Hughes and More in Career-Spanning IndieWire Interview
Last month, Warren Beatty hosted an Academy screening on the Fox lot for his new film, “Rules Don’t Apply.” The actor and Oscar-winning director cheerfully greeted new arrivals, but when he introduced his movie it was in his typically controlling fashion: “It’s not a Howard Hughes biopic!”

People can be forgiven for the mistake. Beatty, 79, has wanted to make a movie about the neurotic aerospace and movie mogul since 1973, when he noticed during a stay at the Beverly Hills Hotel that a room was always occupied by two crewcut men in dark suits. The self-protective movie star thought the hotel was spying on him, but a manager told Beatty that the men worked for Howard Hughes, who at the time reserved seven rooms, plus five private bungalows for his girls.

At the time, Beatty was working with Robert Towne on the Oscar-nominated script of “Shampoo” (1975). Hal Ashby directed
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Warren Beatty Talks Hollywood Legends, Humanizing Howard Hughes and More in Career-Spanning IndieWire Interview

  • Indiewire
Warren Beatty Talks Hollywood Legends, Humanizing Howard Hughes and More in Career-Spanning IndieWire Interview
Last month, Warren Beatty hosted an Academy screening on the Fox lot for his new film, “Rules Don’t Apply.” The actor and Oscar-winning director cheerfully greeted new arrivals, but when he introduced his movie it was in his typically controlling fashion: “It’s not a Howard Hughes biopic!”

People can be forgiven for the mistake. Beatty, 79, has wanted to make a movie about the neurotic aerospace and movie mogul since 1973, when he noticed during a stay at the Beverly Hills Hotel that a room was always occupied by two crewcut men in dark suits. The self-protective movie star thought the hotel was spying on him, but a manager told Beatty that the men worked for Howard Hughes, who at the time reserved seven rooms, plus five private bungalows for his girls.

At the time, Beatty was working with Robert Towne on the Oscar-nominated script of “Shampoo” (1975). Hal Ashby directed
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Taxi Driver,’ ‘Raging Bull’ Cinematographer: ‘Great Cinema Need Not Be Beautiful’

‘Taxi Driver,’ ‘Raging Bull’ Cinematographer: ‘Great Cinema Need Not Be Beautiful’
Cinematographer Michael Chapman, best-known for “Taxi Driver” and “Raging Bull,” and feted at Camerimage next week with a lifetime achievement award, advises young would-be master lensers that great cinema need not be beautiful.

Visual splendor can be “a terrible mistake,” says the former ‘50s-era New York beatnik and later freight brakeman. “It shouldn’t be beautiful — it should be appropriate.” And the most impressive visual images “are often things shot on people’s cell phones,” he adds, whether natural disasters or Isis atrocities.

That approach was key to Chapman’s breakout film as a young cinematographer, the now-iconic 1973 Hal Ashby pic “The Last Detail,” which followed two foul-mouthed sailors on a nonsensical cross-country assignment to hand over a young seaman to the brig.

The low-budget film, shot on street locations with available light, often “bars, railway stations and lunchrooms,” showed off an early-career Jack Nicholson “and maybe Jack’s best role in a weird way,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Awards Roundup: Robert De Niro to Be Honored at Chaplin Gala, Jon Favreau to Receive Cinema Audio Society Award and More

  • Indiewire
Awards Roundup: Robert De Niro to Be Honored at Chaplin Gala, Jon Favreau to Receive Cinema Audio Society Award and More
Keep up with the glitzy awards world with our weekly Awards Roundup column.

Robert De Niro will receive the Chaplin Award at the Film Society of Lincoln Center’s 44th Chaplin Award Gala on May 8, 2017. The event will celebrate De Niro’s more than 40-year career in cinema and his championing of independent film through the Tribeca Film Festival and Tribeca Film Institute.

Read More: Awards Roundup: Annette Bening to Receive AFI Tribute, Shirley MacLaine Honored With Lafca Award and More

“De Niro has long been such a legendary presence that one can overlook the remarkably fine-tuned craft and quality he has brought to his roles over his multi-decade career,” Lesli Klainberg, Executive Director of the Film Society of Lincoln Center, said in a statement. “If you watch his performances, from ‘Mean Streets’ and ‘The Godfather Part II’ to ‘Raging Bull’ and ‘Awakenings’ and on to his more recent work
See full article at Indiewire »
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