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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2000 | 1999 | 1994 | 1991

8 items from 2017


Podcast Preview

22 hours ago | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Vertigo,’ ‘Free Fire,’ and Much, Much More

This week on the One Perfect Podcast Channel we have a score of great shows coming up.

First off, Matthew Monagle is joined by critic Tomris Laffly to discuss — what else? — Ben Wheatley’s Free Fire starring Brie Larson, Armie Hammer, and Cillian Murphy. If you don’t know the format, Monagle and his guest discuss the film both before and after seeing it, weighing expectations against reality. The result is a review show unlike every other, and one you have to check it out.

Then on Shot by Shot, the cinematography podcast hosted by myself and One Perfect Shot creator Geoff Todd, we’re talking about a film many consider to be the greatest ever made, Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo, which was shot by the Master of Suspense’s favorite Dp, the great Robert Burks.

Then there’s Neil Miller’s The Big Idea, the »

- H. Perry Horton

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‘In the Heat of the Night’ Turns 50: Why This Police Classic Still Thrills — TCM Fest

5 April 2017 4:15 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Ever wonder why “In the Heat of the Night” beat “The Graduate” and “Bonnie and Clyde” for Best Picture Oscar in 1968? Well, as Bobby Kennedy told director Norman Jewison when he presented the movie with the New York Film Critics Award, “Norman, timing is everything.”

It’s hard to believe that the movie came out 50 years ago. Sidney Poitier and Rod Steiger lit up the screen in the racially-charged murder mystery that not only captured the Civil Rights zeitgeist but also delivered a damn good drama. On April 6, the TCM Classic Film Festival celebrates that anniversary with a gala opening night screening at the Chinese Theatre IMAX on Hollywood Boulevard, attended by Jewison, Poitier, producer Walter Mirisch, Lee Grant, and composer Quincy Jones.

Considered an underdog that year, “Heat” took home five Oscars, including Best Actor for Steiger, Stirling Siliphant’s Best Adapted Screenplay, Hal Ashby’s Editing, and Sound Mixing. »

- Bill Desowitz

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Will Michael Shannon Join ‘Deadpool 2’ as Cable?

23 March 2017 9:04 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

I really, really hope so.

It isn’t official yet so take this news with a grain of salt, but according to Variety, Michael Shannon (Man of Steel, Midnight Special) is Fox’s top choice to play the character Cable in Deadpool 2. Previously Pierce Brosnan had been rumored to be in the mix, but according to the report, Shannon is the studio’s “top choice.”

For those who don’t know, Cable is Nathan Summers, the future child of Scott Summers, a.k.a. Cyclops, and Jean Grey, a.k.a. Marvel Girl? Phoenix? She’s got a lot of secret identities. In the comics, he comes from the future to lead the New Mutants/X-Force, and he’s an all-around badass: cybernetic arm, cybernetic eye, a penchant for cigars, big shiny guns, and a hatred of guff, in that he doesn’t take any. Attitude-wise, he’s like a cross between Wolverine and Sgt. Slaughter: »

- H. Perry Horton

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Film / Notfilm

18 March 2017 11:52 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

An experimental film by an Irish playwright, shot in New York with a silent comedian at the twilight of his career? Samuel Beckett’s inquiry into the nature of movies (and existence?) befuddled viewers not versed in film theory; Ross Lipman’s retrospective documentary about its making asks all the questions and gets some good answers.

First there’s the film itself, called just Film from 1965. By that year our high school textbooks had already enshrined Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot as a key item for introducing kids to modern theater, existentialism, etc. … the California school system was pretty progressive in those days. But Beckett had a yen to say something in the film medium, and his publisher Barney Rosset helped him put a movie together. The Milestone Cinematheque presents the UCLA Film & Television Archive’s restoration of Film on its own disc, accompanied by a videotaped TV production »

- Glenn Erickson

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Witness the Evolution of Cinematography with Compilation of Oscar Winners

6 February 2017 1:47 PM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

This past weekend, the American Society of Cinematographers awarded Greig Fraser for his contribution to Lion as last year’s greatest accomplishment in the field. Of course, his achievement was just a small sampling of the fantastic work from directors of photography, but it did give us a stronger hint at what may be the winner on Oscar night. Ahead of the ceremony, we have a new video compilation that honors all the past winners in the category at the Academy Awards

Created by Burger Fiction, it spans the stunning silent landmark Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans all the way up to the end of Emmanuel Lubezki‘s three-peat win for The Revenant. Aside from the advancements in color and aspect ration, it’s a thrill to see some of cinema’s most iconic shots side-by-side. However, the best way to experience the evolution of the craft is by »

- Jordan Raup

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ASC Awards 2017: ‘Lion’ Steals ‘La La Land’s’ Thunder

5 February 2017 12:30 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

While Damien Chazelle predictably took the DGA Award for “La La Land” on Saturday night, the ASC rejected the self-reverential Hollywood musical in favor of the more dramatic and politically impactful “Lion,” honoring Australian cinematographer Greig Fraser. “Lion” director Garth Davis took home Best First Director at the DGAs.

However, “La La Land’s” cinematographer, Linus Sandgren, still remains the Oscar favorite, despite the fact that, in the last 20 years, the ASC winner has taken the Academy Award 11 times.

With “Lion,” the incredibly true story of Saroo Brierley (Dev Patel), the Indian who used Google Earth to locate his birth family several decades after his separation and adoption in Australia, Fraser essentially made two movies in one. Fortunately, the top Camerimage prize winner had previous experience shooting in India.

“Trying to capture the essence of India is almost like trying to bottle magic, which is hard to do because India »

- Bill Desowitz

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‘Lion,’ ‘Game of Thrones,’ ‘Mr. Robot’ Win ASC Awards

4 February 2017 10:58 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Lion” lenser Greig Fraser walked away with top honors in the feature film category at the 31st annual American Society of Cinematographers Awards Saturday night. Fraser also won the Golden Frog at last year’s Camerimage cinematography festival.

Other nominees in the field were James Laxton (“Moonlight”), Rodrigo Prieto (“Silence”), Linus Sandgren (“La La Land”) and Bradford Young (“Arrival”). Each of the Asc feature nominees were also nominated by the Academy this year.

In the Asc’s TV categories, “Game of Thrones” and “Mr. Robot” came out victorious, while HBO’s “The Night Of” won in the miniseries/pilot category.

“House of Others” Dp Gorgka Gomez Andreu won the third annual Spotlight award, which recognizes feature-length projects that are screened at festivals, internationally, or in limited theatrical release.

Denzel Washington and cinematographers Edward Lachman, Philippe Rousselot, Bill Garcia and Nancy Schreiber won honorary awards.

Last year’s Asc and Oscar »

- Kristopher Tapley

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‘Lion,’ ‘Game of Thrones,’ ‘Mr. Robot’ Win Asc Awards

4 February 2017 10:58 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Lion” lenser Greig Fraser walked away with top honors in the feature film category at the 31st annual American Society of Cinematographers Awards Saturday night. Fraser also won the Golden Frog at last year’s Camerimage cinematography festival.

Other nominees in the field were James Laxton (“Moonlight”), Rodrigo Prieto (“Silence”), Linus Sandgren (“La La Land”) and Bradford Young (“Arrival”). Each of the Asc feature nominees were also nominated by the Academy this year.

In the Asc’s TV categories, “Game of Thrones” and “Mr. Robot” came out victorious, while HBO’s “The Night Of” won in the miniseries/pilot category.

“House of Others” Dp Gorgka Gomez Andreu won the third annual Spotlight award, which recognizes feature-length projects that are screened at festivals, internationally, or in limited theatrical release.

Denzel Washington and cinematographers Edward Lachman, Philippe Rousselot, Bill Garcia and Nancy Schreiber won honorary awards.

Last year’s Asc and Oscar winner for cinematography was Emmanuel Lubezki for »

- Kristopher Tapley

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2000 | 1999 | 1994 | 1991

8 items from 2017


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