Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDesk
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDesk
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2000 | 1999

17 items from 2017


Tribeca 2017 Women Directors: Meet Quinn Shephard — “Blame”

20 April 2017 7:06 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Blame

As an actress, Quinn Shepard is best known for Paul Feig’s “Unaccompanied Minors and “Hostages” on CBS. Her upcoming films include “Sweet, Sweet Lonely Girl” and Desiree Akhavan’s “The Miseducation of Cameron Post.” Her directorial work includes the short film “Till Dark.” “Blame,” which she directed at just 20 years old, is her feature debut.

Blame” will premiere at the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival on April 22.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Qs: “Blame” tells the story of two girls who find themselves deeply entangled in rivalry when their new substitute drama teacher casts one over the other as Abigail Williams in their high school production of Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible.”

The film draws many parallels to the play, and it delves into the psyche of modern teens in a way that vacillates between the raw and dreamlike, mirroring the perspective of the young protagonists’ coming-of-age.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Qs: When I was a sophomore in high school, I was cast as Abigail Williams in a regional production of Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible.” At 15, it was the most mature role I’d ever played, and the experience had a tremendous impact on me.

Beyond my fascination with the play, embodying Abigail had a strong influence on my day-to-day life. It changed the way I perceived both myself and the world around me. The role innately tied into my own coming-of-age; I felt powerful for the first time.

The script for “Blame” was born, not only from imagining what Abigail’s story would look like set in a modern day high school, but also from observing the way she changed my own perspective, and heightening that to a fictional level.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Qs: “Blame” begins with a lot of familiar characters in a prototypical all-American high school; it plays into tropes and stereotypes in a way that pokes a bit of fun. But by the end, all of that is turned on its head. We see a lot of films about student-teacher relationships, about girl-to-girl rivalries, but this rarely portrayed from such a young and brutally honest perspective.

I hope the final act makes people question the judgements they made at the beginning of the film — and maybe even reactions they’ve had to films on similar subjects in the past. It’s important to me that every character is intimately understood and humanized by the time the credits roll.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Qs: Ha! Can I say everything? “Blame” was pretty much a two-woman show. My mom and I produced the film together — by ourselves. We did everything — and I mean everything. It was all-day, everyday, for years. I totally gave up on having a normal life. We literally poured every bit of energy and money we had into this film!

We were doing so many things for the first time, learning as we went. But what came out of it is something beautiful that we are both tremendously proud of.

If I was going to single out a challenge, music is the part I completely underestimated. I found every musician you hear in the film myself. My mom and I had to teach ourselves music law. I was there for the writing and production of 90 percent of the songs.

It was months and months of work, but luckily I gathered a team of generous and talented artists, including my amazing composer Peter Henry Phillips, who I found by chance at a Quebec City music festival! I was literally walking past the venue on the street and heard his music. I was so drawn in that I convinced my family to stay for the show. My mom encouraged me to approach him after his set and he ended up scoring the film.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at Tribeca?

Qs: It’s an incredible honor. I am an east coast girl through and through, and I truly love New York. I have been to Tribeca many times as an audience member, but never as a director. They have shown tremendous support for the film, which means a lot. And my entire cast and crew is NY-based, so it is shaping up to be one big reunion for us!

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Qs: The best advice I’ve received was the repeated advice to just go for it, over and over, from my mom. Even when I was 15, it was, “You can direct a movie! You can get your favorite actor to star in it! We can make this happen!” I never doubted my ability to achieve my dreams because I was repeatedly told, “Why not?”

Years before “Blame” happened, we used to watch Chris Messina in movies and talk about him starring in the film as if it was already a reality. I don’t think I would have had the guts to track down his email and write to him if my mom didn’t constantly tell me my dreams were plausible, realistic goals. It gave me so much confidence from such an early age.

In my opinion, the worst advice I’ve received was during our early test screenings. I was advised to cut a few scenes from “Blame” that made test audiences uncomfortable. From my perspective, there is nothing about the topics I examine in my film that should be easy to swallow. The point is to shoot a scene that is beautifully composed, sexy, and familiar, but make it raw and realistic to the point where you start to question the beauty of it, and you’re forced to face what the scene is really about.

I want people to be uncomfortable. And if those scenes don’t make you uncomfortable — that’s part of the self-reflection. Why not?

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Qs: To stick to their vision with full confidence and have faith in their gut instinct. All of the female directors I admire have unwavering, exceptionally strong visions for their films.

It’s easy in an industry like this to feel like women’s voices need to be softer, flexible, or more apologetic. Screw that. Women know what they want, and their stories and ideas are just as important as those of their male colleagues — maybe even more so!

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Qs: It is so hard to pick a favorite. I’d have to say it’s a toss-up between Andrea Arnold’s “Fish Tank,” Marielle Heller’s “The Diary of a Teenage Girl,” and Céline Sciamma’s “Girlhood.”

Fish Tank” and “Girlhood” are big tonal references for me as a filmmaker. The magical realism and distinctive color palette of “Girlhood” and the intimacy of certain scenes in “Fish Tank” — the scene where Michael Fassbender and Katie Jarvis are wading in the pond comes to mind — just take your breath away.

“Diary of a Teenage Girl” is perfect. It’s funny, tragic, relatable, heartbreaking, and celebratory. Most importantly, the film shows not a shred of judgement for its protagonist.

Runners up are Kimberly Peirce’s “Boys Don’t Cry,” Elizabeth Wood’s “White Girl,” Lynne Ramsay’s “We Need to Talk About Kevin,” and, of course, Sofia Coppola’s “The Virgin Suicides.”

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have.

Qs: I am optimistic because women are amazing, and we’ll fight ten times harder for what we deserve. It’s a tough industry, and unfortunately gender bias is very real. But, the more I see festivals like Tribeca taking strides towards more diversified lineups of directors, the more I see possibility for change.

Hopefully, the major production companies will eventually stop seeing certain films as designated “women’s stories” and will recognize that the pool of working female directors out there in the world are equipped to tackle any topic with the same versatility as men!

Tribeca 2017 Women Directors: Meet Quinn Shephard — “Blame” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Kelsey Moore

Permalink | Report a problem


Glamour and Girlgaze Partner for #NewView Short Film Competition

19 April 2017 11:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

#NewView judge Rashida Jones in “Cuban Fury”: Entertainment One Films

Glamour magazine is teaming up with digital media company Girlgaze to support young female filmmakers. A press release announced that the two companies are launching #NewView, a film competition for new directors looking for work experience and the chance to get their foot in the door of the film industry.

#NewView’s goal is to shine a spotlight on how women see the world. “We want your point of view,” the release explains. In order to compete, filmmakers will submit a three to five-minute original short film “that showcases their perspective — on an issue, on their own life, or on our culture.”

The five winners will receive $3,000 each and their films will screen on Glamour.com and Girlgaze.tv: “Winners will also receive a production budget to direct a short video for Glamour or one of the following major brands: Birchbox, LuMee, The Outnet, and South Coast Plaza.”

A panel of judges led by Glamour editor-in-chief Cindi Leive and Girlgaze CEO/founder Amanda de Cadenet will choose the winning films. Katia Beauchamp, Birchbox CEO/cofounder, will act as the competition’s entrepreneurial advisor. The #NewView panel’s other judges are:

Actors/entertainers Rashida Jones, Geena Davis, Chloë Grace Moretz, Tracee Ellis Ross, Lilly Singh, Jada Pinkett Smith, Amandla Stenberg, and ZendayaFilmmakers Gia Coppola, Ellen Kuras, Victoria Mahoney, Crystal Moselle, Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy, Kimberly Peirce, Dee Rees, Regina K. Scully, and Sam Taylor-JohnsonTV execs and writers Shonda Rhimes and Jill SolowayNetflix vp of content acquisition Bela BajariaHBO prez of documentary films and family programming Sheila NevinsCondé Nast Entertainment prez Dawn Ostroff

Referencing the consistently dismal numbers of women behind the camera, de Cadenet commented: “Girlgaze continues our mission to close the gender gap by creating visibility and tangible job opportunities for girls behind the lens. We are excited to collaborate with Glamour to launch the #NewView film initiative and champion the extraordinary storytellers in our community.”

The #NewView competition is part of Glamour’s overall #PoweredByWomen project, “which aims to meaningfully increase the brand’s collaboration with female creative talent in 2017 and beyond.” #PoweredByWomen was officially introduced via the magazine’s February 2017 issue — the first ever edition to be produced entirely by women.

Film submissions will be accepted until 11:59 Pm Et on June 30. Check out the #NewView website for more information.

Glamour and Girlgaze Partner for #NewView Short Film Competition was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Rachel Montpelier

Permalink | Report a problem


Kathryn Hahn Gets Obsessed In New Trailer For Amazon’s ‘I Love Dick’

10 April 2017 8:42 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Helping to put Amazon on the map with “Transparent,” Jill Soloway likely has some creative pull at the streaming giant, and they definitely wanted to see what she had up her sleeve next. Well, that project is the provocatively named “I Love Dick.”

Starring Kevin Bacon, Kathryn Hahn, Griffin Dunne, Lily Mojekwu, Roberta Colindrez, and India Menuez, and featuring episodes directed by Jill Soloway, Andrea Arnold, Kimberly Peirce, and Jim Frohna, the series is an adaptation of the book by Chris Kraus, and details the unique impact the titular Dick has on a woman who finds herself marooned in Marfa, Texas.

Continue reading Kathryn Hahn Gets Obsessed In New Trailer For Amazon’s ‘I Love Dick’ at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


Catherine Hardwicke Set to Direct “Miss Bala” Remake for Sony

5 April 2017 8:02 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Catherine Hardwicke: Tiff/YouTube

Catherine Hardwicke has found her next gig. According to The Hollywood Reporter, the “Twilight” director will helm Sony’s remake of “Miss Bala,” a 2011 Mexican drama from Gerardo Naranjo.

The original film sees protagonist Laura (Stephanie Sigman) enter the Miss Baja beauty pageant. “During rehearsals, she witnesses a gang killing DEA agents and nightclub-goers and is then kidnapped by the gang and forced to work for them in the deadly drug war,” THR summarizes. “Miss Bala” premiered at Cannes in the Un Certain Regard competition and was Mexico’s submission for Best Foreign Language Film at the Oscars.

The remake will center on Gloria Meyer, “who finds herself a pawn, after her friend Suzu goes missing in Tijuana, in a dangerous game being played by the CIA, the DEA and a charismatic young crime boss,” the source details. Deadline reports that “Jane the Virgin” star Gina Rodriguez is one of the actresses being pursued to play Gloria.

Gareth Dunnet-Alcocer will pen the script, while Kevin Misher (Kimberly Peirce’s “Carrie”) and Pablo Cruz (the original “Miss Bala”) will produce. Andy Berman (“Rosewood”) will exec produce.

“The truth is, most of those female stories that are contending for Oscars are directed by men. Let’s be honest,” Hardwicke has said about the films that generate awards buzz. “All the ones that were getting an Oscar pitch with the money and everything behind them were by men.”

Hardwicke’s “Twilight” earned $383 million worldwide on a budget of $37 million. It still holds the record of the highest opening weekend for a female director. “Miss You Already,” “Red Riding Hood,” and “Thirteen” are among her other films. Hardwicke is attached to direct the big screen adaptation of Ya novel “Stargirl” toplined by Joey King (“Fargo”).

Catherine Hardwicke Set to Direct “Miss Bala” Remake for Sony was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Rachel Montpelier

Permalink | Report a problem


Attention, Screenwriters: New Opportunities for Horror, TV and Women Over 40 — Roundup

24 March 2017 10:14 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Every week, IndieWire’s Filmmaker Toolkit rounds up the latest in opportunities that can help those looking to advance projects or get a career started in the film industry. The following grants, labs, fellowships, contests and other non-profit opportunities could be a great way to help kickstart your movie and TV dreams.

New Opportunities & Upcoming Deadlines

NBC’s Writers on the Verge

– NBCUniversal’s Writers on the Verge 12-week program focuses on polishing and preparing television writers for a staff writer position on a television series. Writers who are “almost there” but need assistance with their final bit of preparation with their writing and personal presentation skills are encouraged to apply. The program consists of two night classes, which will typically be held on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 7 – 10 Pm weekly at NBCUniversal in Universal City, CA. Once accepted, students must attend all classes and turn in all written assignments.

Past »

- Allison Picurro and Chris O'Falt

Permalink | Report a problem


What Happened to the Women Directors in Hollywood? Part 4: 1984–1999

17 March 2017 2:02 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Mississippi Masala

by Carrie Rickey

This five-part Truthdig series by Carrie Rickey is published in partnership with Women and Hollywood. The series considers the historic accomplishments of women behind the camera, how they got marginalized, and how they are fighting for equal employment. Specifically, this series asks, why do females make up between 33 and 50 percent of film-school graduates but account for only seven percent of working directors? What happened to the women directors in Hollywood?

While female filmmakers waited for Judge Pamela Rymer to hand down a decision in the 1983 Directors Guild class-action suit against Warner Brothers and Columbia Pictures, alleging discrimination for not hiring women and ethnic minorities represented by the guild, there were positive signs of change in Hollywood.

In 1984, for the first time that almost anyone could remember, one needed two hands to count the number of feature films by women released in the U.S. market. One was Diane Kurys’ “Entre Nous” (1983), nominated for best foreign film at the Academy Awards in April 1984, making Kurys the second female director whose film was so honored.

Between 1950 and 1980, the number of movies directed by women in the Directors Guild of America (DGA) totaled 14. From 1984 to 1985 there were 12.

In 1984 many women were making their second features. Among them were Gillian Armstrong’s period drama “Mrs. Soffel,” Amy Heckerling’s gangster comedy “Johnny Dangerously,” Penelope Spheeris’ teenage-runaway saga “Suburbia,” and Amy Holden Jones’ romantic drama “Love Letters.” Martha Coolidge, beloved for “Valley Girl,” her 1983 debut, was on her third feature, “National Lampoon’s Joy of Sex.” With more women behind the movie camera in the United States than any time since the ’teens, it seemed that Hollywood was reopening the studio gates to women. Their movies featured women in lead roles.

The wave of optimism crested in 1985. Argentine director Maria Luisa Bemberg’s historical romance “Camila” (1984) was in contention for best foreign film. Susan Seidelman, an Nyu film-school grad who made a splash in 1983 with the indie “Smithereens,” released “Desperately Seeking Susan,” starring “It Girl” Rosanna Arquette and Madonna, cast when the latter was a relative unknown. It was a runaway hit. Heckerling and Spheeris each released third features, respectively “National Lampoon’s European Vacation” and “The Boys Next Door.” Coolidge released her fourth: “Real Genius,” a genuinely funny nerd comedy with a fully developed female character — and special effects.

Then came the crash.

In August 1985 Judge Rymer handed down her decision. While the class-action case was important and viable, Rymer ruled, she had to disqualify the DGA from leading the class due to a conflict of interest. White male members also competing for directing jobs dominated the guild, she said. Thus the DGA was in no position to represent the interests of its women and ethnic minority members. Out of exhaustion and lack of money, the Original Six, the group of female filmmakers that had first spurred the DGA to initiate the suit, did not pursue it any further.

As the DGA suit played out during the early 1980s, Hollywood’s business model was in flux. Studios abandoned the one-size-fits-all strategy of advertising a movie in general-interest publications and embraced segmented marketing — that is, making and marketing movies to a specific demographic. Fewer dollars were spent advertising movies in mainstream newspapers and more were spent on ads that ran during TV shows young males were said to watch. More and more, movies starred predominantly men and boys. Because actors had higher-profile roles, they could command higher salaries than actresses.

By dividing the market into sectors, studios divided the audience and the culture. Boys see movies about boys. Older people see movies about older people. Women see movies about women. Those in different demographics no longer watch the same stories.

In 1980, four of the 10 top box office stars were women: Sally Field, Jane Fonda, Sissy Spacek, and Barbra Streisand. In 1990 there was only one: Julia Roberts. According to 1990 statistics from the Screen Actors Guild, not only were actresses underpaid, but they were also “undercast”: 14 percent of the leading roles, and only 29 percent of all roles, went to women.

The “Indiana Jones” trilogy made in the 1980s reflected the progressively diminishing role of females in film during a decade when male action/adventures dominated the multiplex. In “Raiders of the Lost Ark” (1981), the character Marion Ravenwood (Karen Allen) plays Indy’s helpmate. In “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” (1984), the Willie Scott character (Kate Capshaw) is helpless. And in “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade,” archeologist Elsa Schneider (Alison Doody) is the enemy.

Despite such trends, the late 1980s and 1990s proved to be boom years for female directors in Hollywood and Indiewood, as independent film is known. In 1987, Kathryn Bigelow, a onetime sculptor and graduate of Columbia University’s film program, made her second feature, the “vampire Western” “Near Dark.” And though Elaine May’s studio film “Ishtar” was almost universally panned upon release, it earned belated respect. Richard Brody of The New Yorker correctly described it as “an unjustly derided masterwork.” In 1987, six percent of films were directed by women, higher than at any time since 1916.

The percentage dropped in 1988, but that was a watershed year for female filmmakers. “Big,” a comedy from Penny Marshall (co-written by Anne Spielberg), was universally acclaimed. It was the first movie directed by a woman that surpassed $100 million at the box office. With the romantic comedy “Crossing Delancey,” Joan Micklin Silver returned to making big-screen fare, and her modest hit was well received. Also in 1988, Silver’s daughter, Marisa, made her second feature, “Permanent Record,” about teen suicide. “Salaam, Bombay!”, the first feature from Mira Nair, the India-born, Harvard-educated documentarian, was a best foreign film Oscar nominee.

The following year, “Look Who’s Talking” from Amy Heckerling likewise surpassed the $100 million mark for box office sales in the U.S. and made nearly $300 million worldwide. For the most part, though, heads of studios regarded Marshall’s and Heckerling’s box-office smashes as flukes. Two heads of production told me in 1991 that “movies by women don’t make money.” Nevertheless, it turned out to be a exceptional year for the quality and range of releases from women. And it shaped up to be a year when movies by female filmmakers did make serious money.

Some of the highlights of 1991: Julie Dash’s “Daughters of the Dust,” an evocative portrait of generations of Gullah women off the South Carolina coast circa 1901; Jodie Foster’s “Little Man Tate,” about a child prodigy emotionally torn between his mother and a psychologist for gifted children; and Mira Nair’s “Mississippi Masala,” a sexy romance about a South Asian woman born in Uganda (played by then-newcomer Sarita Choudhry) in love with an African-American man (Denzel Washington). Both Kathryn Bigelow’s action film “Point Break” and Barbra Streisand’s psychological study “Prince of Tides” examined the emotional costs to men who struggle to prove their masculinity. Bigelow’s movie grossed $83 million and Streisand’s $110 million. (Adjusted for inflation, that’s $148 million and $196 million in today’s dollars.)

Not only can female filmmakers make movies that show a different side of men, but they also make movies that show different aspects of women. Penny Marshall’s “A League of Their Own” (1992), about the All-American Girls Baseball Leagues during World War II, celebrates the athleticism (rather than the sexuality) of the female body. Nora Ephron’s “This is My Life,” her 1992 directorial debut about a single mom whose choice of comedy career affects her daughters, shows that career and motherhood need not be in conflict. Like Ephron’s film, Allison Anders’ “Gas Food Lodging” (also 1992) explores what happens when the children of single moms reconnect with biological fathers. Male directors were, and are not, making movies like these.

During the 1990s, almost every year brought a new evergreen made by a female filmmaker. In 1993 there were two. One was Jane Campion’s “The Piano,” a haunting allegory about a mute woman that struck a chord internationally. It earned $62 million at the box office and multiple Oscar nominations, including one for best director, making Campion the third woman to be cited in this category. The other was Nora Ephron’s “Sleepless in Seattle,” the comedic romance between two people who don’t meet in person until the last scene, which scored a $227 million box office.

“Sleepless” additionally introduced the questionable concept of the “chick flick” to a broader audience. This is a non-genre that has come to be defined as any movie that, according to the term’s proponents, women want to see and that men think they don’t want to watch — or any movie directed by a woman. The division between “chick flick” and its corollary, the “dick flick,” is a perhaps unintended consequence of target marketing, implying that movies represent a gender-linked proposition.

Almost overnight, the perception was created that movies predominantly featuring women, or “women’s interests,” or directed by women would shrivel the manhood of the male moviegoer. In 1994 the head of a major studio told me, without irony or shame, that “Women on the screen means no men in the audience.” When I asked him for data to back up his claim, he said he had it, but it was proprietary.

Despite such signs of cultural and corporate sexism, the 1990s were a good time to be a female filmmaker. In 1994, Gillian Armstrong’s “Little Women” was immediately embraced as a classic. Newcomer Darnell Martin’s “I Like it Like That,” an urban comedy about a working mother juggling job, marriage, and parenthood, earned positive reviews. And Rose Troche’s “Go Fish,” the first indie comedy about girl-on-girl courtship, marked a milestone for the burgeoning genre.

The following year, 16 films by women were in U.S. release, setting another record for that era. Many of them were comedies. There was Amy Heckerling’s “Clueless,” a droll version of Jane Austen’s “Emma” set at a Beverly Hills high school. There is Betty Thomas’ “The Brady Bunch Movie,” in which the former actress sets the characters of the 1970s TV hit in the 1990s to great comic effect. Distinctly not a comedy was Kathryn Bigelow’s “Strange Days,” a science-fiction thriller about sex crimes, which lost money but became a cult favorite. At the 1996 Oscar ceremony, with “Antonia’s Line,” Dutch filmmaker Marleen Gorris became the first female filmmaker to direct the award-winning foreign film.

But apart from Bigelow and Mimi Leder, a director of episodic television who in 1997 directed “The Peacemaker” and in 1998 “Deep Impact,” female filmmakers were not making action films. For the most part women made comedies and human stories, movies with no explosions in the opening scene. Veteran filmmaker Martha Coolidge spoke for many women when she noted that the scripts the studios sent her were for comedies or family dramas. “About 90 percent of what comes my way are ten different kinds of breast cancer stories, ten kinds of divorce stories, and ten kinds of women-taking-care-of-their-fathers stories,” she said. “I do those. I care about those deeply. But one does want to do more.”

Female filmmakers were typecast in the way many actors and actresses have been, for the most part pigeonholed in family drama and comedy genres. For example, in 1997 actress Kasi Lemmons made her directorial debut with “Eve’s Bayou,” a haunting family drama, and Betty Thomas returned with the Howard Stern biopic “Private Parts.” In 1998, Ephron returned with the romantic comedy “You’ve Got Mail.” Nancy Meyers, a long-time screenwriter, made her directorial debut with the family-friendly comedy “The Parent Trap,” and Brenda Chapman, a Disney animator, was one of three directors on “Prince of Egypt,” the animated story of Moses.

In 1999, three female filmmakers made rookie features unlike anything in American movies. Two were romantic dramas about teenage sexuality, the other an imaginative Shakespeare adaptation. Sofia Coppola’s “The Virgin Suicides,” based on the novel by Jeffrey Eugenides, looked at how boys look at girls, subversively turning the female gaze on the male gaze. Kimberly Peirce’s “Boys Don’t Cry” dramatized the life story of Teena Brandon, who changed her name and gender to become Brandon Teena and fell victim to a hate crime.

Julie Taymor, the theater director who created “The Lion King” on stage, made her movie debut with “Titus,” an anachronistic version of the Shakespeare history play “Titus Andronicus,” underscoring its parallels to Italy under Mussolini.

At the end of the decade — and century — of the 11,000 filmmakers working both in television and film included in the Directors Guild of America, about 2,300 were women. While women made up 21 percent of the membership, they comprised only 9 percent of the filmmakers working in movies.

Most, including Martha Lauzen, a professor at San Diego State University and the head of the Center for the Study of Women in Film and Television, naturally assumed that in the new century the needle would move toward 50/50.

In addition to writing film reviews and essays for Truthdig, Carrie Rickey has been a film critic at The Philadelphia Inquirer and Village Voice, and an art critic at Artforum and Art in America. Rickey has taught at various institutions, including School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania, and has appeared frequently on NPR’s “Talk of the Nation,” MSNBC, and CNN.

What Happened to the Women Directors in Hollywood? Part 4: 1984–1999 was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Women and Hollywood

Permalink | Report a problem


Spirit Awards 2017: Red Carpet Arrivals (Photos)

25 February 2017 12:50 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

“See what Hollywood’s biggest stars are wearing as they head into the Independent awards show, hosted by Nick Kroll and John MulaneyThe Mindy Project” and “Jackie” actress, Beth GrantThe Witch” director Robert Eggers with Alexandra ShakerThe Get Down” actress, Yolanda RossMorris From America” director Chad HartiganGrimm” star Bitsie Tulloch “Boys Don’t Cry” director Kimberly PeirceTransparent” actress Trace Lysette “Life, Animated” director Roger Ross WilliamsWaste Land” director Lucy WalkerVeep” star Sam Richardson Spirit Awards hosts John Mulaney and Nick Kroll “Carlos” star Edgar RamirezPulp Fiction” actress Rosanna Arquette Shohreh Aghdashloo »

- Rasha Ali

Permalink | Report a problem


Brie Larson Calls on Hollywood to Fight For Change: ‘Artists Are the Ones That the Politicians Fear’

25 February 2017 6:00 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

As Oscars weekend kicks into full swing, Hollywood plays home to a host of events honoring nominees and other industry luminaries. On Friday night, the 10th Annual Women In Film Pre-Oscar Cocktail Party celebrated some of the year’s most lauded women nominees, including Actress contenders Emma Stone, Meryl Streep, Viola Davis, and Ruth Negga, along with documentary filmmakers Ava DuVernay and Kahane Cooperman, producers Dede Gardner, Jenno Topping, Donna Gigliotti, and many more.

Officially hosted by both Wif President Cathy Schulman and Oscar winner Brie Larson, the West Hollywood event was a busy, cheery event that focused firmly on the promise of the future, even in uncertain times. Also on hand were members of Reframe, a new activist organization formed to mobilize for gender equality in the film industry, including Schulman, Sundance’s Keri Putnam, Miramax’s Zanne Devine, directors Paul Feig and Kimberly Peirce, and Franklin Leonard.

Read »

- Kate Erbland

Permalink | Report a problem


Paul Feig, Kimberly Peirce, and 50 Others Address Gender Inequality With Sweeping New Initiative

22 February 2017 9:30 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Hot on the heels of the momentous announcement of the Eeoc’s finding that Hollywood Studios “systematically discriminated” against women directors, a group of 52 executives, producers, and directors have banded together to present ReFrame, a new initiative working towards concrete, lasting change when it comes to gender inequality.

Founded by Keri Putnam of the Sundance Institute and Cathy Schulman of Women In Film, the duo behind the Female Filmmakers Initiative have amassed an influential group of industry creatives committed to the mission of gender parity. For the last two years, the group has been plotting and strategizing new ways to break gender barriers in Hollywood.

Read More: Major Hollywood Studios ‘Systematically Discriminated’ Against Female Directors, Eeoc Finds — Report

Those strategies include a committee for designing and implementing a Re Frame stamp of approval, modeled after the Human Rights Campaign’s equality sticker, that signifies a project meets ReFrame’s standards; the Culture Change Toolkit, »

- Jude Dry

Permalink | Report a problem


Berlin Film Review: ‘A Fantastic Woman’

12 February 2017 1:30 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Multiple mirrors abound in frame after frame of “A Fantastic Woman,” repeatedly reflecting the woman of the title — young, beautiful, headstrong Marina — in all her, well, fantastic glory. It may seem an obvious, even clichéd, visual trope for the resourceful Chilean director Sebastián Lelio to fall back on, until it dawns on us that its very obviousness is precisely the point: We’re given every conceivable opportunity to see and perceive Marina for exactly who she is. So why do so many of those around her struggle to do the same? In this exquisitely compassionate portrait of a trans woman whose mourning for a lost lover is obstructed at every turn by individual and institutional prejudice, Lelio has crafted perhaps the most resonant and empathetic screen testament to the everyday obstacles of transgender existence since Kimberly Peirce’s “Boys Don’t Cry” in 1999. Mingled with a wily, anxious streak of noir styling, »

- Guy Lodge

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscar Directing Nominees Help Us Trace Their DNA

7 February 2017 9:30 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Directors influence each other with their work. Sometimes that influence is overt — “La La Land” clearly evokes “Singin’ in the Rain” and “Umbrellas of Cherbourg” — but other times it is more unexpected, hinging on storytelling choices or structure.

Variety asked this year’s directing nominees to help us trace the DNA of their movies, and all were happy to oblige.

Arrival

Paramount

In Villeneuve’s alien-invasion tale, humans eventually discover that the aliens “want to help you help us.”

Villeneuve’s choices:

“2001: A Space Odyssey” 1968: “Definitely ‘2001’,” Villeneuve says, of Stanley Kubrick’s sci-fi classic in which Earthlings, searching for signs of intelligent life, are nearly outwitted by artificial intelligence.

Jaws” 1975: “It was Spielberg’s idea that you unveil slowly the entity, to create suspense,” Villeneuve says. “That very slow striptease is something I stole from ‘Jaws.’ ”

Our choices:

The Day the Earth Stood Still” 1951: Aliens caution »

- Marshall Fine

Permalink | Report a problem


Sundance ’17: The Horizon Award Supports Emerging Women Filmmakers

26 January 2017 4:22 PM, PST | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

The Horizon Award Co-Founders — Christine Vachon, Lynette Howell Tayler, Cassian Elwes, and CEO of ShivHans Pictures — Shivani Rawat

(Photo by: Dan Campbell / Horizon Award)The Horizon Award heads back to Sundance Film Festival for its third year and cofounders Cassien Elwes, Lynette Howell Taylor and Christine Vachon bring new and returning sponsors.

The Wme Lounge in Park City, Utah during the 2017 Sundance Film Festival hosted the crowded celebratory event where everyone freely mixed and met each other.

Six directors judged the final 53 films to select the two winners. Catherine Hardwicke (“Thirteen”, “Twilight”), Kimberly Peirce (“Boys Don’t Cry”, “Carrie”), Jamie Babbit (“But I’m a Cheerleader”, “Addicted to Fresno”), Karyn Kusama (“Jennifer’s Body”, “Æon Flux”), Tina Mabry (“Mississippi Damned”, “Queen Sugar”), and Vicky Jenson (“Shrek”, “Shark Tale”) chose. Brittany “B Monét” Fennell and Andy Villanueva whose self-directed short films of two minutes or less were submitted through the website (www. »

- Sydney Levine

Permalink | Report a problem


Jill Soloway on her Sundance return with 'I Love Dick'

23 January 2017 2:17 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The Emmy-winning creator of Transparent won the directing award at Sundance 2013 for her first feature Afternoon Delight and talks to Elbert Wyche about her return to Park City with the first three episodes of the Amazon Studios series.

Comedy-drama I Love Dick premiered in Park City on Monday and stars Kathryn Hahn and Griffin Dunne as a struggling couple who develop a fascination for Kevin Bacon in the titular role as an enigmatic professor.

Soloway co-directed the series with Andrea Arnold, Kimberly Peirce and Jim Frohna. Sarah Gubbins wrote the pilot episode for the Texas-based story, adapted from Chris Kraus’ 1997 cult classic that has been lauded by feminists across the world.

Soloway discusses the spirit of the Women’s March On Washington, the creative freedom afforded by Amazon Studios, and creating a show that eschews traditional gender roles and their representation on television. I Love Dick premieres on Amazon Prime on May 12.

Did you take part in »

Permalink | Report a problem


Sundance: Thousands brave poor weather to join March On Main

21 January 2017 3:06 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Main Street was inundated during Saturday’s March On Main as approximately 4,000 people according to police estimates took over Park City.

Marchers resisted the snow and low temperatures to bear placards in support of women’s rights, the environment and healthcare as a strong anti-Donald Trump sentiment rippled through the crowd. At time of writing there had been no arrests.

The march was one of 350 sister events across the Us and 20 countries in conjunction with the huge Women’s March On Washington on the first day of the 45th Us president’s term of office.

“Hello all you pussies!” actress Mara Bello told the assembled Park City crowd. “When they punch you in the pussy, punch them back with your pussy power.”

Bello’s comments drew prolonged cheers and were in reference to Trump’s notorious 2005 remarks about groping women that came to light late last year.

#MarchOnMain organising committee member Chelsea Handler led the march »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

Permalink | Report a problem


Sundance: Thousands join March On Main

21 January 2017 3:06 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Main Street was inundated during Saturday’s March On Main as approximately 4,000 people according to police estimates took over Park City.

Marchers bore placards in support of women’s rights, the environment and healthcare as a strong anti-Donald Trump sentiment rippled through the crowd. At time of writing there had been no arrests.

The march was one of 350 sister events across the Us and 20 countries in conjunction with the huge Women’s March On Washington on the first day of the 45th Us president’s term of office.

“Hello all you pussies!” actress Mara Bello told the assembled Park City crowd. “When they punch you in the pussy, punch them back with your pussy power.”

Bello’s comments drew prolonged cheers and were in reference to Trump’s notorious 2005 remarks about groping women that came to light late last year.

#MarchOnMain organising committee member Chelsea Handler led the march and was joined by Salt Lake City »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

Permalink | Report a problem


Park City Women’s March: Massive Crowd Turns Out to Protest Donald Trump During Sundance

21 January 2017 12:40 PM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

The Women’s March on Main hit Park City on a snowy Saturday morning, turning the first weekend of Sundance into a very different kind of must-attend event. Despite the frigid cold weather, turnout was high and the crowd remained energized during the march and hour-long parking lot rally, which spilled out around the surrounding hills and streets.

Despite the slow traffic — packed shuttles and lines of cars stretched down the ski town’s main thoroughfares and out of town as women and men flocked in from Salt Lake City and local environs — the mood was jovial, and at least one shuttle broke out into a chat of “this is what democracy looks like!” before even arriving at the rally.

Marchers included such Sundance Film Festival attendees as Charlize Theron, Kristen Stewart, carrying a Planned Parenthood sign and wearing “I’m with Meryl” stickers on her parka, John Legend, and »

- Anne Thompson and Kate Erbland

Permalink | Report a problem


Park City Women’s March: Massive Crowd Turns Out to Protest Donald Trump During Sundance

21 January 2017 12:40 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Women’s March on Main hit Park City on a snowy Saturday morning, turning the first weekend of Sundance into a very different kind of must-attend event. Despite the frigid cold weather, turnout was high and the crowd remained energized during the march and hour-long parking lot rally, which spilled out around the surrounding hills and streets.

Despite the slow traffic — packed shuttles and lines of cars stretched down the ski town’s main thoroughfares and out of town as women and men flocked in from Salt Lake City and local environs — the mood was jovial, and at least one shuttle broke out into a chat of “this is what democracy looks like!” before even arriving at the rally.

Marchers included such Sundance Film Festival attendees as Charlize Theron, Kristen Stewart, carrying a Planned Parenthood sign and wearing “I’m with Meryl” stickers on her parka, John Legend, and »

- Anne Thompson and Kate Erbland

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2000 | 1999

17 items from 2017


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners