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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 1999 | 1996

1-20 of 31 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »

Academy Award Film Series: It Takes Eastwood to Get Enthusiastic Praise for Derivative, Mostly Predictable Father Figure Melo

6 October 2015 5:33 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Million Dollar Baby' movie with Hilary Swank and Clint Eastwood. 'Million Dollar Baby' movie: Clint Eastwood contrived, overlong drama made (barely) watchable by first-rate central performance Fresh off the enthusiastically received – and insincere – Mystic River, Clint Eastwood went on to tackle the ups and downs of the boxing world in the 2004 melo Million Dollar Baby. Despite the cheery title, this is not the usual Rocky-esque rags-to-riches story of the determined underdog who inevitably becomes a super-topdog once she (in this case it's a “she”) puts on her gloves, jumps into the boxing ring, and starts using other women as punching bags. That's because about two-thirds into the film, Million Dollar Baby takes a radical turn toward tragedy that is as unexpected as everything else on screen is painfully predictable. In fact, once the dust is settled, even that last third quickly derails into the same sentimental mush Eastwood and »

- Andre Soares

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Matt Damon's having a moment, and it doesn't seem like it's a good one

28 September 2015 1:15 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Matt Damon's having a moment, and it doesn't seem like it's a good one. Whenever an actor has a new project coming out, they're automatically in the hot seat, and you'd better believe there is a small army hard at work trying to make sure that nothing happens during that press tour that might impact the overall success of the film. Add in a new TV show that's rolling out the same time as the movie is being released, and you have so many more opportunities for the actor to hang themselves, particularly in the atmosphere of constantly-simmering outrage that exists right now. Damon has never been one to keep his opinion to himself, and it was interesting watching a moment from "Project Greenlight" blow up in his face, especially since he's part of the producing team that is responsible for the show. He could have had that moment »

- Drew McWeeny

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Papandrea and Debicki to be honoured at Australians in Film Awards

8 September 2015 5:52 PM, PDT | IF.com.au | See recent IF.com.au news »

Oscar winning producer Bruna Papandrea is set to recieve this year's Orry Kelly International Award at the Australians in Film Awards in Los Angeles.

On October 25, Australians in Film will host its annual AiF Awards and Benefit Gala at the Intercontinental Hotel in Los Angeles..

Actor, Elizabeth Debicki, has taken out the Breakthrough Talent of 2015 Award..

Presenter Carrie Bickmore will be master of ceremonies at this year.s awards, which celebrates the achievements of Australians working in Hollywood and also recognises the contribution of individuals to the Australian film industry.

.The Orry Kelly International Award is given to an Australian who has paved the way for other Australians in the entertainment industry and who has provided much support, mentoring and inspiration to others..

Papandrea's credits include Milk, Wild and Gone Girl.

Previous Orry Kelly honorees have included director Baz Luhrmann, film executive Greg Coote and filmmaking collective, Blue Tongue Films. »

- Inside Film Correspondent

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Film Review: 'Theeb'

20 August 2015 12:50 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★☆ "Only two kinds of creature get fun in the desert. Bedouins and gods", the exquisitely cynical diplomat Mr. Dryden (Claude Rains) tells T.E. Lawrence (Peter O'Toole) in David Lean's Lawrence of Arabia (1962), "and you're neither." He could have added a third category of desert tourists: directors. The desert is a supremely photogenic location and filmmakers as diverse as Bernardo Bertolucci, George Lucas and Anthony Minghella have all basked on the shifting sands and now Brit-born Abu Nowar joins their ranks with Theeb (2014). It's 1916 and the world is at war but that feels very remote to Theeb (Jacir Eid), a young Bedouin who lives with his brother Hussein (Hussein Salameh) and his tribe.


- CineVue UK

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Natalie Portman’s directorial debut ‘A Tale of Love and Darkness’ gets an international trailer

14 August 2015 8:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Actress Natalie Portman is a veteran of the big screen, having already amassed two decades of experience since her feature film debut in Luc Besson’s 1994 film Léon: The Professional. Her subsequent career has seen her work with The Wachowskis, Mike Nichols, Wes Anderson, Michael Mann, Darren Aronofsky, and Anthony Minghella, and with Portman dipping her directorial toes in short films, many were curious to see if she’d make the jump to behind the camera for a feature film. Her latest feature will see her do just that.

Titled A Tale of Love and Darkness, Portman pulls triple duty on the film, as performer and director alongside writing the screenplay, adapted from the memoir by Amos Oz. The film’s synopsis is as follows.

A drama based on the memoir of Amos Oz, a writer, journalist, and advocate of a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

The film is in Hebrew, »

- Deepayan Sengupta

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Sony’s Tom Rothman Sets New Leadership Team for Columbia, TriStar (Exclusive)

6 August 2015 1:33 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Five months after being named head of Sony Pictures, Tom Rothman is making his first substantial restructuring of his leadership team — consolidating his position with the appointment of two new executives at the studio’s flagship Columbia Pictures and naming a new president of the TriStar label, according to a person familiar with the moves.

Rothman is moving his former right-hand from TriStar, David Beaubaire, to Columbia, where he will become an executive vice president of production. Beaubaire will be joined at Columbia by Palak Patel, who is leaving his post as president of production at Roth Films to also become exec VP of production at Columbia. Taking over Rothman’s former job as president of TriStar will be Hannah Minghella, who most recently served as co-head of production at Columbia.

All three of the newly appointed executives will report to Doug Belgrad, who remains president of Sony’s Motion Picture Group. »

- James Rainey

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Cannes: Todd Haynes and Writer Phyllis Nagy Talk 'Carol,' Glamorous Stars, Highsmith and More

1 June 2015 6:55 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Author Patricia Highsmith is most well-known for her six Tom Ripley novels (currently heading for the small screen), and many of her works have been made into movies, from Alfred Hitchcock's "Strangers on a Train" to Anthony Minghella's 1999 "The Talented Mr. Ripley." When Phyllis Nagy was working as a researcher at the New York Times when she was in her early 20s, she was assigned to accompany Highsmith on a walking tour of the Greenwood Cemetery. They became friends, and thus Nagy came to know the novelist, who lived in Switzerland, in the last ten years of her life. They corresponded, and when Nagy moved to London a few years later, they saw each other more often. Highsmith suggested that Nagy, who was establishing her career as a playwright ("Butterfly Kiss"), should adapt one of her books.  "I’d heard her talk about how much she hated all of her adaptations, »

- Anne Thompson

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‘The Talented Mr. Ripley’ Goes to TV

29 May 2015 3:30 PM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

The Ripley character created by Patricia Highsmith has been the center of many films. The best-known now is probably The Talented Mr. Ripley, directed by Anthony Minghella with Matt Damon (above) in the lead role. And Rene Clement’s Purple Noon is a standout that should be better known. There are actually five films all told, with five different actors […]

The post ‘The Talented Mr. Ripley’ Goes to TV appeared first on /Film. »

- Russ Fischer

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How 'Mad Max: Fury Road' lured Oscar winner John Seale back behind the camera

11 May 2015 8:30 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

John Seale was retired. Then George Miller dangled a "Mad Max" movie in front of his face and, well, how can an Aussie say no? The 40-year veteran jumped right into the maelstrom Miller and his team were conjuring in the desert of west Africa and, along with killer second unit teams, captured one of the most innervating experiences of the year in "Mad Max: Fury Road." Oh, and he turned 70 years old while doing all of this. Seale won an Oscar for "The English Patient," the first of a three-film collaboration with the late Anthony Minghella. He also partnered up with Peter Weir on a trio of projects ("Witness," "The Mosquito Coast" and "Dead Poets Society") and he's worked with many great filmmakers besides, from Sydney Pollack to Ron Howard, Rob Reiner to Wolfgang Petersen. In addition to the win, he has three more Oscar nominations to his credit and I must say, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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A Perfect Shot: John Seale on the piano reflection from 'The Talented Mr. Ripley'

7 May 2015 6:12 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Before Oscar-winning cinematographer John Seale shuffled off to retirement, only to be lured back into the fray by director George Miller for the virtuoso stylings of "Mad Max: Fury Road," he clocked a lot of hours working with filmmaker Anthony Minghella. The two collaborated on three major productions: 1996's "The English Patient," 1999's "The Talented Mr. Ripley" and 2003's "Cold Mountain." The 1999 entry is, full stop, a masterpiece of modern cinema. With shades of latter-day Hitchcock pulsing through a narrative wound uncomfortably tight, "The Talented Mr. Ripley" might be the finest work Minghella, who passed away in 2008, ever committed to the screen. It features more than just evocative, but rather outright palpable atmosphere and a detailed sense of place. Minghella coaxed incredibly layered performances out of actors like Matt Damon, Jude Law (Oscar nominated for his work), Philip Seymour Hoffman, Gwyneth Paltrow and Cate Blanchett and, as ever, told the story visually in captivating ways. »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Every Best Picture Oscar Winner, Ranked From Worst to Best

6 May 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

This week marks the 10th anniversary of the release of "Crash" (on May 6, 2005), an all-star movie whose controversy came not from its provocative treatment of racial issues but from its Best Picture Oscar victory a few months later, against what many critics felt was a much more deserving movie, "Brokeback Mountain."

The "Crash" vs. "Brokeback" battle is one of those lingering disputes that makes the Academy Awards so fascinating, year after year. Moviegoers and critics who revisit older movies are constantly judging the Academy's judgment. Even decades of hindsight may not always be enough to tell whether the Oscar voters of a particular year got it right or wrong. Whether it's "Birdman" vs. "Boyhood," "The King's Speech" vs. "The Social Network," "Saving Private Ryan" vs. "Shakespeare in Love" or even "An American in Paris" vs. "A Streetcar Named Desire," we're still confirming the Academy's taste or dismissing it as hopelessly off-base years later. »

- Gary Susman

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Time Machine: Paltrow Silvery Oscar Dress at 83rd Academy Awards

1 May 2015 6:03 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Gwyneth Paltrow silver dress on the Oscars' Red Carpet Gwyneth Paltrow at the Academy Awards Donning a shining silver dress, Gwyneth Paltrow arrives at the 2011 Academy Awards held on Feb. 27 at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. Paltrow's latest movie, Country Strong, was up for a Best Song Oscar. It lost to the Toy Story 3 ditty "We Belong Together," by Randy Newman. More than a decade ago, Gwyneth Paltrow took home the Best Actress Oscar for John Madden's Shakespeare in Love (1998), a romantic comedy-drama also featuring Joseph Fiennes (as William Shakespeare), Judi Dench, Geoffrey Rush, and this year's Best Actor Oscar winner, Colin Firth (The King's Speech). Paltrow's (moderately) gender-bending Shakespeare in Love heroine remains her only Oscar-nominated performance to date. Directed by Shana Feste, Country Strong fared decently at the U.S. box office, but not as well as some had expected. Besides Gwyneth Paltrow, the cast includes »

- D. Zhea

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Why 1999 was the best year in movie history

30 April 2015 8:40 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century? Check here for a complete list of our essays. The end of the 1990s was the end of an era on the big screen. The independent filmmaking movement that started the decade had taken full bloom and infiltrated the business. Major studios had begun to jump headlong into the "dependent" game, amping up prestige product and utilizing the awards season as a marketing tool. The blockbuster landscape at the summer multiplex had been interesting, full of original concepts (good and bad), but something else was on the way — a new overlord in the business of film, and one that would more or less make the age of the movie star (at least as we had come to know it) a thing of the past. For those reasons and a slew of others, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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25 underrated 1990s movie soundtracks

28 April 2015 3:02 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

From Muppet Treasure Island to Speed, we take a look at the 90s soundtracks that deserve another listen...

Ah, the 1990s. The decade that brought us The Lion King. Titanic. Quentin Tarantino. That wordless bathroom scene in Baz Luhrmann's Romeo + Juliet. Angelo Badalamenti's Twin Peaks. Duel of the Fates from Star Wars: The Phantom Menace. In the Mood for Love.

It was a good 10 years for film music, no doubt.

But scratch the surface of 1991 through 1999 and there are tons of good scores ready to spring a surprise on your ears. Some were attached to sorely underrated movies, others were overshadowed by wildly successful ones, and some have simply been forgotten in the passage of time.

Here, in no particular order, are the top 25 underappreciated film soundtracks from the 1990s.

1. Chaplin - John Barry

Okay, let's start with a big one. Richard Attenborough. Robert Downey Jr. John Barry. »

- simonbrew

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Alan Rickman Charms Audience During BAFTA Life In Pictures Event

17 April 2015 6:21 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

August actor-director Alan Rickman effortlessly charmed audiences on a balmy London evening as he took a stroll down memory lane for the latest in BAFTA’s Life in Pictures series. Recalling a career that has seen him work with some of the film industry’s most talented and eclectic directors, including Neil Jordan, Alfonso Cuaron, Tim Burton, Ang Lee and the late Anthony Minghella, Rickman mused on his late start in the film business. “To be perfectly honest, having a film… »

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Alan Rickman interview: A Little Chaos, villains, Doctor Who

14 April 2015 9:00 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Alan Rickman chats to us about directing, Anthony Minghella, movie villains and A Little Chaos...

"Where does Den Of Geek come from as a title?", asked Alan Rickman as I settled into my seat to interview him for his second film as director, A Little Chaos. I don't usually write one of those setting the scene preambles for interviews, but there was something really quite special about hearing Alan Rickman's voice in person for the first time.

In truth, as I walked through the door, I had no idea what to expect. Would Rickman be curt? Frosty? Would he want to cut out my heart with a spoon?

None of the above. He was as you'd hope: both brilliant, and Alan Rickman. And here's how the interview went...

I've travelled down from the Midlands for this interview, and been walking through London this morning. And I've walked past lots »

- simonbrew

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BBC Films Celebrates Its 25th Birthday

26 March 2015 2:19 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

It’s an institution, in the best possible sense of the word. And nowadays it’s impossible to think of “the Beeb” without thinking of its filmmaking arm. This week BBC Films celebrated its 25th birthday, a quarter of a century of British independent filmmaking during which it has developed and produced over 250 films. The anniversary comes just a month after it won the Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema award at the BAFTAs. From its first film, Anthony Minghella’s "Truly Madly Deeply" in 1990, just a smattering of the back catalogue reflects the quality of its output, much by directors nurtured at the start of their filmmaking careers: "Jude" (Michael Winterbottom), "Twenty Four Seven" (Shane Meadows), "Billy Elliot" (Stephen Daldry), "Last Resort" and "My Summer of Love" (Pawel Pawlikowski), "Eastern Promises" (David Cronenberg), "The Duchess" (Saul Dibb), "An Education" (Lone »

- Demetrios Matheou

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BBC Films reach 25th anniversary with Armando Iannucci's David Copperfield

25 March 2015 1:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Dickens adaptation from In the Loop director announced to coincide with BBC’s celebration of milestone for its successful feature film arm

The BBC will briefly be distracted from the Jeremy Clarkson controversy on Wednesday as the 25th anniversary of its feature film arm, BBC Films, is celebrated with a reception at the Radio Theatre inside its New Broadcasting House building in central London.

Set up as a separate entity in 1990, with its first “official” production the Anthony Minghella-directed romance Truly Madly Deeply, starring Juliet Stevenson and Alan Rickman, BBC Films has had a hand in more than 250 films in a wide variety of formats and genres: from popular TV spin-offs such as Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa, Mrs Brown’s Boys D’Movie and In the Loop, to boundary-pushing art films such as Andrea Arnold’s Red Road, Lynne Ramsay’s Ratcatcher and Derek Jarman’s Edward II.

Continue reading. »

- Andrew Pulver

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BBC Films unveils 25th anniversary slate

25 March 2015 1:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Ricky Gervais, James Marsh, Armando Iannucci films on slate.

BBC Films has revealed details of its upcoming slate, which includes new projects from Ricky Gervais, Armando Iannucci, James Marsh and Ritesh Batra.

The slate of projects was revealed during an event in London to celebrate the 25th birthday of BBC Films, whose first first theatrical production, Truly Madly Deeply, directed by Anthony Minghella, was released in 1990.

As previously reported, Ritesh Batra (The Lunchbox) will direct an adaptation of Julian Barnes’ Man Booker Prize winning novel The Sense of an Ending.

The adaptation is the debut screenplay of award-winning playwright Nick Payne and tells the story of Tony Webster, whose comfortable world is rocked to its foundations by the emergence of an explosive letter from his careless youth.

David Thompson will produce for Origin Pictures.

Rafe Spall is confirmed for Swallows and Amazons, a reinvention of Arthur Ransome’s classic. Written by Andrea Gibb, the film will »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Timeless style by Anne-Katrin Titze

25 March 2015 10:28 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Beastie Boy Adam Horovitz, Amanda Seyfried and Ben Stiller with While We're Young director Noah Baumbach, also starring Naomi Watts and Adam Driver with Charles Grodin, Maria Dizzia and Dree Hemingway Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Noah Baumbach says Academy Award Best Costume Design winner Ann Roth "has a way of dressing people - that you can't put your finger on." Roth won for Anthony Minghella's The English Patient, starring Ralph Fiennes, Juliette Binoche, Willem Dafoe and Kristin Scott Thomas and is a BAFTA honoree for John Schlesinger's The Day Of The Locust, which starred Donald Sutherland, Karen Black and Burgess Meredith. Roth also received Oscar nominations for her work on Robert Benton's Places In The Heart and again with Minghella for The Talented Mr. Ripley.

Noah's 2012 film, Frances Ha, with Greta Gerwig, Mickey Sumner and Adam Driver, had no costume designer credit, although Sumner's godmother is famed costume designer Colleen Atwood. »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 1999 | 1996

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