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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 1999 | 1996

18 items from 2017


Tiff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Susanna White — “Woman Walks Ahead”

8 September 2017 11:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Woman Walks Ahead

Susanna White is a BAFTA-winning film and television director. Her previous credits include “Our Kind of Traitor” and “Parade’s End.” White was lauded for her six episodes of “Bleak House” for the BBC, winning a host of international broadcast awards including the BAFTA and Rts awards for Best Drama Serial. She also helmed BBC’s “Jane Eyre,” which earned her an Emmy nomination.

Woman Walks Ahead” will premiere at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival on September 10.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Sw: “Woman Walks Ahead” tells the story of Catherine Wheldon (Jessica Chastain), a portrait painter from New York, who, in 1890 set out on her own from New York to the Dakotas to paint a portrait of Sitting Bull (Michael Greyeyes). Mistakenly thinking she would find freedom in the lifestyle of the Sioux Indians in contrast to the oppression women faced in New York, Wheldon becomes increasingly politicized as she discovers that Sitting Bull’s people are in danger of losing their ancestral lands.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Sw: My agent gave it to me because I was looking for an epic love story — something in the tradition of films like “The English Patient,” by Anthony Minghella. In fact, this isn’t a love story in a conventional sense at all — it is the story of two oppressed people giving each other hope. As soon as I read it I knew I had to make the film. It spoke to me so strongly.

I grew up loving the epic landscape of Westerns. This is set in that world but you hear the stories of people you don’t normally hear in those narratives — the Native American community and a strong woman. There’s also a very spiritual aspect to the movie that drew me — the sense that the land was there before any of us and will be there after we have passed through it.

I had always been interested in Native American history. My father worked at the Hudson’s Bay Company in London and in the reception there was a glass case with a full-size figure of a warrior dressed in an eagle headdress and a war shirt. I was always drawn to it and spent ages looking at the feathers and beadwork.

After I left film school I went to watch a ceremony on the Hopi reservation and was fascinated by the sense of how ancient and spiritual the culture was in contrast to the modern America I knew in Los Angeles.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Sw: I’d like people to reflect on their history. I was very moved when our Lakota language adviser, Ben Blackbear, watched the movie and said he hoped it would change the way history was taught in schools because it was telling a story his community usually didn’t get told. What struck me doing the research on the Lakota people and reading about Sitting Bull was the sophistication of the culture.

The quality of the artwork and textiles is extraordinary and Sitting Bull was a man of such wisdom — there are so many great quotes from him, my favorite being “the greatest strength is in gentleness.” That is such an antithesis to the conventional narrative of a Western.

I’d like people to reflect on the value the Sioux people put on co-existing with the natural world — taking only what they needed so they didn’t exhaust natural resources. There are lessons for the modern world to draw from that.

W&H: What were the biggest challenges in making the film?

Sw: In making this movie I was very conscious, of being, like Wheldon, an outsider. While I could relate to being a woman in late 19th century New York, I knew I had a huge amount to learn about Native American culture. I asked for help from the community and had an amazing experience when I was invited to stay on the Rosebud reservation to watch a Sun Dance ceremony.

People were incredibly generous in coming forward to teach me and share their traditions. Many of these were deeply spiritual — the Ghost Dance for example that we show in the film was a sacred dance which hadn’t been performed on the scale we were doing it in the movie for over a hundred years. I felt a great sense of responsibility to get that right. We also had wonderful crew members from the community as well as cast who would offer up help on the day.

This was not a big budget movie — we shot it in 31 days. I had to be very focused everyday on what were the most essential elements of every scene in order to make the days. I made a decision to jettison big set pieces and focus on the emotional heart of the film. Mike Eley, the cinematographer, and I also worked to give the movie scale by offering up big skies and landscapes — at the heart of the film is the story of our relationship to the land and its scale came from the wonder of the natural world rather than big builds or crowd scenes.

W&H: How did you get your film funded?

Sw: Period dramas are always challenging for independent film — this was a very ambitious movie, taking someone from New York to the plains of Dakota in the 1890s. There were a lot of reasons why it had taken 14 years to get made. It has not always been easy to finance a movie with a female lead and there have been very few Native American actors with big box office profile.

Fortunately times are changing and with Chastain attached we managed to attract finance from Erika Olde at Black Bicycle Entertainment, who has been very committed to strong female stories. Sales estimates didn’t match the original needs of the budget so I cut some of the big set pieces — Brooklyn Bridge, New York Street scenes, and a big steamboat sequence — in order to concentrate on what I felt was the emotional heart of the story.

We played to our strengths, abandoning crowd scenes for big skies and landscapes in which people are dwarfed by nature.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at Tiff?

Sw: Tiff always felt like the ideal environment for this movie. We were on tenterhooks in the run up to the announcements and when I heard that we had been invited I was over the moon. It was a dream come true.

It is especially resonant for us as Toronto is Greyeyes’ home town.

W&H: What is the best advice you have received?

Sw: The best advice I have received is from the British producer Tony Garnett. I worked with him early on and he told me that you never want to see any acting going on. That has always been my touchstone. If you feel the mechanics of the acting something isn’t right and it is my job as the director to shift things in order to free up the actors to give their best.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Sw: I have never really seen myself as a female director, just as a director who happens to be a woman — but I know that is not how the world always sees us. I’d advise other women to try to bounce back when they get knocks and not to give up. If you want it enough you will get there in the end.

The most important thing is to listen to your own voice — that can be hard sometimes when there aren’t many female voices being heard out there.

W&H: Name your favourite woman-directed film and why.

Sw: It has always been Jane Campion’s “The Piano.” Almost every time I embark on a new piece of work I watch it — it is such an inspiration. Up until I saw that movie I knew I wanted to be a filmmaker and admired huge numbers of films but there were not that many films I could connect to on a really deep level.

When I saw “The Piano” it was like someone was singing in a key that felt like me whereas the other films had been in a different range. It’s not that I want to re-make “The Piano.” It is just that it has such a clearly female voice that is so different from what went before.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Sw: I have been very involved in the campaign at Directors UK to get more women directors in Britain. Certainly in the UK I feel the tide is changing. People within the industry were very shocked when we published our data set and there seems to be a genuine desire to bring about change.

This is perceived not just in terms of redressing gender equality but also in pursuit of greater cultural richness. I think the work of the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media and organizations like Women and Hollywood have really raised awareness worldwide.

Change will not happen overnight but I am optimistic that for my daughter’s’ generation things will be different.

Tiff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Susanna White — “Woman Walks Ahead” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Lyra H.

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Oscars: David Rubin Returning to Produce Governors Awards

8 September 2017 10:45 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

David Rubin will return to produce the ninth annual Governors Awards for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Academy president John Bailey made the announcement on Friday. Honorary awards will be presented to writer-director Charles Burnett, cinematographer Owen Roizman, actor Donald Sutherland, and director Agnès Varda at the Nov. 11 ceremony at the Hollywood & Highland Center’s Ray Dolby Ballroom.

Related

Oscars: Charles Burnett, Owen Roizman, Donald Sutherland, Agnes Varda Set for Academy’s Governors Awards

“David’s continuing and passionate commitment to the Governors Awards assure us that the evening will be a memorable tribute to this year’s four distinguished filmmakers,” Bailey said.

Rubin has casting credits on more than 100 films and TV programs, including “Trumbo,” “Wild,” “Lars and the Real Girl,” “Hairspray,” “The Talented Mr. Ripley,” “Men in Black,” “Romeo + Juliet,” “The English Patient,” “Get Shorty,” “Fried Green Tomatoes,” and “Four Weddings and a Funeral.”  He has received six Emmy nominations, most »

- Dave McNary

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Chile’s Growing Film Festival Scene: Sanfic Announces Lineup

30 July 2017 1:55 PM, PDT | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

The thirteenth edition of Santiago International Film Festival, Sanfic (August 20–27, 2017), the largest film festival in Chile, will present more than 100 international and Chilean films, including productions shown and awarded in festivals such as Cannes, Berlin and Venice. Among the feature films will be 7 world and 14 Latin American premieres.

Sanfic (Santiago International Film Festival) is opening the festival to international press this year with Variety Dailies and important international guests for their Sanfic Industry section. Guest attending include Kim Yutani (Sundance programmer), Javier Martin (Berlinale delegate), Molly O ́Keefe (Tribeca Film Institute — fiction features) and Estrella Araiza (Industry director of Guadalajara Iff), to name a few. Matt Dillon is its special guest along with the renowned director of photography Rainer Klausmann.

The Summit starring Ricardo Darín, Dolores Fonzi and Erica Rivas, with an appearance of Christian Slater and renowned Chilean actors Paulina Garcia and Alfredo Castro

The opening film of the »

- Sydney Levine

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La La Land meets Isle of Wight in Minghella Jr’s debut as a director

22 July 2017 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Max Minghella follows in father Anthony’s footsteps as a screenwriter and director

The late Anthony Minghella was one of Britain’s most admired film-makers, winning nine Oscars for The English Patient, the war drama he wrote and directed, inspired by Michael Ondaatje’s novel. A decade after his death, his son is following in his footsteps as a writer and director, working with the producer of La La Land, the musical that won six Oscars this year.

Actor Max Minghella is making his directorial debut with a British feature film set on the Isle of Wight, where his father’s family ran an ice-cream business. The new film, Teen Spirit, is a coming-of-age drama about a shy girl who has dreams of becoming a pop star and enters an international music competition.

Continue reading »

- Dalya Alberge

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Artificial Eye co-founder Pamela Engel dies aged 82

17 July 2017 9:59 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Engel also co-founded UK distributor New Wave Films.

Art-house “trailblazer” Pamela Engel, known for co-founding distributor Artificial Eye and programming London cinemas including the Lumiere, Chelsea Cinema, Camden Plaza and the Renoir, has died aged 82.

A huge figure in the UK’s independent film business, Engel’s death has sparked messages of praise across the distribution and exhibition sectors.

Born Pamela Balfry in 1934, the UK executive started out in the late 1950s as a secretary for then Sight and Sound editor Penelope Houston.

She would go on to work as an assistant to Richard Roud at the London and New York Film Festivals before joining Derek Hill’s art-house venue Essential Cinema in the late 1960s.

Odyssey

Balfry and first husband Andi Engel established distributor Artificial Eye in 1976, thus “beginning an odyssey of distribution and exhibition unlikely ever to be surpassed,” in the words of former London Film Festival director Sheila Whitaker.

Despite separating »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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The 25 greatest summer films

24 June 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Which movies best capture the holiday season? Observer film critics choose their sizzling-hot favourites

Anthony Minghella (1999)

Continue reading »

- Wendy Ide, Mark Kermode, Guy Lodge, Jonathan Romney and Simran Hans

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Simon Beaufoy adapting In the Skin of a Lion

23 June 2017 12:00 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Oscar-winning screenwriter Simon Beaufoy (Slumdog Millionaire) is set to adapt Michael Ondaatje’s 1987 novel In the Skin of a Lion for Serendipity Point Films, Film4 and Potboiler Films.

The novel explores the lives of immigrants who played a large role in the building of the city of Toronto in the early 1900s and focuses on romance and class conflict amidst the clash between immigrant workers and the ruling elite.

It also introduces the characters of Hana and David Caravaggio from Ondaatje’s 1992 novel The English Patient, which was adapted for the screen by Anthony Minghella in 1996 and won nine Academy Awards. »

- Gary Collinson

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Jude Law Needs Fewer Soulless Blockbusters and More Iconoclasts Like Paolo Sorrentino’s ‘The Young Pope’

19 June 2017 11:03 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Jude Law, who’s always been hard to pin down, and his title role in HBO Emmy Contender “The Young Pope” is no exception. 

Bottom Line: As he embraces his mid-40s, Jude Law has morphed from British golden boy to globally bankable character actor. His range is wide, from tragic robot Gigolo Joe in Steven Spielberg’s “A.I.” to Robert Downey, Jr.’s comedy sidekick Dr. Watson in Guy Ritchie’s blockbuster “Sherlock Holmes” franchise. Still stunningly handsome, Law is gaining grit and gravitas as he gets older. But there’s a sense he’s still holding back.

Latest Misfires: Law took on evil power-monger Vortigern opposite Charlie Hunnam as Arthur in Ritchie’s attempt to similarly update “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword, »

- Anne Thompson

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‘The Young Pope’: How Jude Law Went Weird with Paolo Sorrentino for His Best Work In Years

19 June 2017 11:03 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Jude Law, who’s always been hard to pin down, and his title role in HBO Emmy Contender “The Young Pope” is no exception. 

Bottom Line: As he embraces his mid-40s, Jude Law has morphed from British golden boy to globally bankable character actor. His range is wide, from tragic robot Gigolo Joe in Steven Spielberg’s “A.I.” to Robert Downey, Jr.’s comedy sidekick Dr. Watson in Guy Ritchie’s blockbuster “Sherlock Holmes” franchise. Still stunningly handsome, Law is gaining grit and gravitas as he gets older. But there’s a sense he’s still holding back.

Latest Misfires: Law took on evil power-monger Vortigern opposite Charlie Hunnam as Arthur in Ritchie’s attempt to similarly update “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword, »

- Anne Thompson

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‘The Young Pope’: How Jude Law Went Weird with Paolo Sorrentino for His Best Work In Years

19 June 2017 11:03 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Jude Law, who’s always been hard to pin down, and his title role in HBO Emmy Contender “The Young Pope” is no exception. 

Bottom Line: As he embraces his mid-40s, Jude Law has morphed from British golden boy to globally bankable character actor. His range is wide, from tragic robot Gigolo Joe in Steven Spielberg’s “A.I.” to Robert Downey, Jr.’s comedy sidekick Dr. Watson in Guy Ritchie’s blockbuster “Sherlock Holmes” franchise. Still stunningly handsome, Law is gaining grit and gravitas as he gets older. But there’s a sense he’s still holding back.

Latest Misfires: Law took on evil power-monger Vortigern opposite Charlie Hunnam as Arthur in Ritchie’s attempt to similarly update “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword, »

- Anne Thompson

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Simon Beaufoy to Adapt ‘In the Skin of a Lion’ From ‘English Patient’ Author

19 June 2017 8:36 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

British screenwriter Simon Beaufoy has signed on to adapt the immigrant story “In the Skin of a Lion” as a movie for Serendipity Point Films, UK’s Film4 and Potboiler Films.

Serendipity’s Robert Lantos (“Barney’s Version,” “Eastern Promises”) and Potboiler’s Andrea Calderwood (“A Most Wanted Man,” “The Last King of Scotland”) will produce.

The project is based on Michael Ondaatje’s 1987 novel about the lives of immigrants who played a large role in the building of the city of Toronto in the early 1900s. The story focuses on romance and class conflict amidst the clash between immigrant workers and the ruling elite.

“In the Heart of a Lion” introduced the characters Hana and David Caravaggio, who were also in Ondaatje’s 1992 novel “The English Patient.” The Anthony Minghella adaptation of the novel won nine Academy Awards, including best picture and best supporting actress for Juliette Binoche in the role of Hana. »

- Dave McNary

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Serendipity Point, Film4, Potboiler team on 'In The Skin Of A Lion'

19 June 2017 12:52 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Simon Beaufoy to adapt screenplay about immigrant workers in Toronto.

Serendipity Point Films, Film4 and Potboiler Productions are partnering on a feature version of Michael Ondaatje’s novel In The Skin Of A Lion.

Simon Beaufoy, the Oscar-winning Slumdog Millionaire writer whose credits include 127 Hours and The Full Monty, will adapt the screenplay.

Serendipity’s Robert Lantos and Potboiler’s Andrea Calderwood are on board as producers on Ondaatje’s sweeping 1987 saga of love and class. 

In The Skin Of A Lion takes place in Toronto in the early 1900s and chronicles the lives and loves of immigrant workers who built the city.

The book set the scene for Ondaatje’s The English Patient, which is regarded as a sequel of sorts. The late Anthony Minghella adapted that novel, which famously went on to win nine Oscars .

Serendipity Point’s recent productions include Barney’s Version and the drama Remember starring Christopher Plummer.

Calderwood and [link »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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21 of the Smolderiest Pictures of Your Handmaid's Tale Crush, Max Minghella

17 May 2017 2:50 PM, PDT | Popsugar.com | See recent Popsugar news »

No doubt you've seen Max Minghella before The Handmaid's Tale - he's had high-profile roles in movies like The Social Network - but his role as Nick, Commander Waterford's driver, on Hulu's hot new hit may be his smolderiest. The sexy British actor (son of filmmaking legend Anthony Minghella) is a very talented actor, but on The Handmaid's Tale and the red carpet, we appreciate when he shifts into his most beautiful gear: smolder. Here are 21 pictures where he's showing off that special skill, all of which may cause you to develop a spontaneous obsession with one Max Minghella. »

- Shannon Vestal Robson

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Cannes: Will Smith, Paolo Sorrentino Join Festival Jury; Full Lineup Announced

25 April 2017 7:27 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Actors Will Smith and Fan Bingbing and directors Paolo Sorrentino and Maren Ade will serve on the 70th Cannes Film Festival’s jury, whose full lineup was unveiled by festival organizers Tuesday.

Smith, Fan, Ade and Oscar-winner Sorrentino join previously announced jurors Jessica Chastain and Pedro Almodovar, who will preside over the panel. Rounding out the jury that will decide the winner of the Palme d’Or are French actress Agnès Jaoui, South Korean director Park Chan-wook and French composer Gabriel Yared.

Spanish helmer Almodovar, who won the festival’s best director prize in 1999 for “All About My Mother” and best screenplay for 2006’s “Volver,” was named as jury president in January. The festival’s artistic director, Thierry Fremaux, revealed that two-time Oscar nominee Chastain would serve on the official competition jury during an interview with French radio earlier this month. The actress’ breakout role came in Terrence Malick’s »

- Robert Mitchell

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Berlin: Elle Fanning to Star in Max Minghella's 'Teen Spirit'

10 February 2017 8:00 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Max Minghella, son of the late Academy Award-winning director Anthony Minghella, has found his leading lady for Teen Spirit.

Elle Fanning will star as aspiring singing star Violet in Minghella's directorial debut, an underdog story set in the world of pop music.

The film, now in pre-production and being unveiled to buyers at the European Film Market in Berlin, was written by Minghella, who made his screenwriting debut last year with The 9th Life of Louis Drax.

"It’s an absolute thrill to be collaborating with Elle on this project. Along with an extraordinary singing voice, she brings an »

- Etan Vlessing

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Anthony Minghella's Son to Make Directorial Debut With 'La La Land' Producer

30 January 2017 9:41 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Max Minghella, son of the late Academy Award-winning director Anthony Minghella, is set to make his directorial debut with Teen Spirit, an "emotional underdog" story set in the world of pop music. 

The film, which is being unveiled to buyers at next month's European Film Market in Berlin, was written by Minghella, who starred in films including The Social Network and The Ides of Marc and made his screenwriting debut just last year with The 9th Life of Louis Drax. Fred Berger (La La Land) is producing alongside Brian Kavanaugh-Jones under their Automatik banner, while Jamie Bell, who helped develop »

- Alex Ritman

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Richard Curtis Honored by Writers Guild With Valentine Davies Award

24 January 2017 10:56 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Richard Curtis has been named the recipient of the Writers Guild of America West’s Valentine Davies Award in recognition of his humanitarian efforts, charitable initiatives and world service.

Curtis’ screenplay credits include “Love Actually,” “Bridget Jones’ Diary,” “War Hose” and “Four Weddings and a Funeral.” He will be honored at the Writers Guild Awards ceremony on Feb. 19 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel.

“The Valentine Davies Award is given to that Wgaw member whose contributions to the entertainment industry and the community-at-large have brought dignity and honor to writers everywhere.” said WGA West President Howard A. Rodman.

“We can think of no better recipient than Richard Curtis. He is not only one of our best screenwriters but a man who has used his gifts and his position to combat poverty and injustice. Curtis is an exemplar of empathy. His work resonates strongly on the screen, and his charitable efforts have »

- Dave McNary

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Derin Seale on making 'The Eleven O'Clock' with Josh Lawson and Damon Herriman

12 January 2017 8:42 PM, PST | IF.com.au | See recent IF.com.au news »

Damon Herriman and Josh Lawson in 'The Eleven O'Clock'..

One of the highlights of this year.s Flickerfest is The Eleven O.Clock, a comedy written by and starring Josh Lawson, alongside Damon Herriman.

The short follows a delusional patient of a psychiatrist who believes he is actually the psychiatrist. As they both attempt to treat each other, the session spirals increasingly out of control. Alyssa McClelland also stars..

Flickerfest marks the film.s Aussie debut, having already screened at the 2016 La Shorts Fest, where it took out Best Comedy, as well as Valladolid International Film Festival and Toronto Short Film Festival.

With the film only just starting its run, director Derin Seale told If the success so far was unexpected.

.I made it for my mum, really; it.s all a bit surprising that people want to watch it,. he laughs.

Seale is a long-time friend of both Lawson and Herriman, »

- Jackie Keast

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 1999 | 1996

18 items from 2017


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