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Krysty Wilson-Cairns to pen screenplay for The Voyeur's Motel by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2016-06-27 16:10:33

27 June 2016 8:10 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Gay Talese at the Andrew Bolton and Wong Kar Wai China: Through the Looking Glass exhibition Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Gay Talese yesterday confirmed by email that the adaptation of his book The Voyeur's Motel (directed by Sam Mendes and produced by Steven Spielberg's DreamWorks) will be written by Krysty Wilson-Cairns (Darren Aronofsky's The Good Nurse).

Wilson-Cairns worked on John Logan's Penny Dreadful TV series. Logan wrote the screenplay for Michael Grandage's Genius starring Colin Firth, Jude Law, Nicole Kidman and Laura Linney. He is also known for Mendes' James Bond films, Spectre and Skyfall. American Beauty, Road To Perdition and Revolutionary Road directed by Mendes were produced by DreamWorks.

The John Logan to Sam Mendes to DreamWorks connection leads to Krysty Wilson-Cairns and Gay Talese.

Gay Talese's The Voyeur's Motel will be published in the Us and UK July, 2016. »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Beyond Fright: Shannon’s 4 Non-Horror (and 1 Horror) Films To Make You Lose Your Faith In Humanity

22 June 2016 5:07 AM, PDT | iconsoffright.com | See recent Icons of Fright news »

When it comes to horror movies, there are so many sub-genres: slasher flicks, creature features, supernatural and more. However, there are always those few films that transcend the horror genre and nestle themselves into a special niche category. That category is one where we watch a film and as the credits roll we promise ourselves that we will never watch that film again. Not because it’s bad per say but because it’s made us lose faith in humanity and the thought of watching it again is too much bear. To save you the trouble of watching these films, I’ve listed the five films that completely shattered my image of human nature. Watch at your own risk, unless you enjoy suffering that is. -Shannon

*Editor’s note – While some of these films might not “technically” fall into the horror genre per se’, they do a hell of a job adding to this article! »

- Jerry Smith

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Oh, give me a home by Anne-Katrin Titze

15 June 2016 1:00 PM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

The Jingoist and Blind screenwriter John Buffalo Mailer Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Cremaster and Drawing Restraint 9 (with Björk) mastermind, Matthew Barney, adapted Norman Mailer's Ancient Evenings to create River Of Fundament. Cornelia Parker staged The Maybe with Tilda Swinton at MoMA and now her Alfred Hitchcock Psycho inspired Transitional Object (PsychoBarn) is on The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Roof Garden - the perfect setting for a John Buffalo Mailer on Norman Bates, Houdini, Steven Spielberg and Sam Mendes on Gay Talese's The Voyeur's Motel, Michael Mailer, Alec Baldwin, Demi Moore and Dylan McDermott conversation.

Ellen Burstyn, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Paul Giamatti, James Toback, Elaine Stritch, Debbie Harry, James Lee Byars, Lawrence Weiner, Salman Rushdie, Luc Sante, Cinqué Lee, Jonas Mekas, Fran Lebowitz, Dick Cavett, Jeffrey Eugenides, Aimee Mullins and Sam Nivola are among the River Of Fundament dwellers. Buffalo Mailer, Milford Graves and Lakota Chief Dave Beautiful Bald Eagle reincarnate as Norman I, Norman II »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Michael Shannon Performs Pixies’ ‘Here Comes Your Man’ On Spike’s ‘Lip Sync Battle’—Watch

15 June 2016 10:26 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Character actor Michael Shannon is best known for his intense, visceral performances, often playing troubled, disturbed characters who exist on society’s margins. But like most contemporary actors, Shannon also has a soft, silly side that shows itself infrequently, like his appearance in the stoner holiday comedy “The Night Before,” his violent cameo in David Wain’s “They Came Together,” and his recent turn as Elvis in “Elvis and Nixon.” However, if for whatever reason you wanted to see Shannon lip sync on television, you will now have your chance. On Thursday’s episode of Spike TV’s “Lip Sync Battle,” Shannon will perform The Pixies’s 1989 song “Here Comes Your Man” off of their seminal album “Doolittle.” He will be facing off against “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend” creator and star Rachel Bloom. Watch a teaser for the performance above.

Read More: Interview: Michael Shannon Talks ‘Midnight Special,’ ‘Nocturnal Animals,’ Herzog’s ‘Salt And Fire’ & Working With Jeff Nichols

Shannon has been acting on stage and screen since 1991 after getting his start in Chicago theatre. He originated the role of Peter Evans in Tracy Letts’ acclaimed 1996 play “Bug,” which was later adapted into a 2006 film. He first came to attention for his role in “8 Mile,” playing the boyfriend of Eminem’s mother. He was nominated for a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his performance in Sam Mendes’ “Revolutionary Road,” co-starring opposite Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet. He gained further acclaim for his performances in the HBO series “Boardwalk Empire,” Jeff Nichols’ “Take Shelter” and “Mud,” “Premium Rush,” and most recently in “99 Homes” and “Midnight Special.”

Lip Sync Battle” airs Thursday night at 10pm Eastern on Spike TV.

Read More: Michael Shannon Reteams With Jeff Nichols For ‘Loving

Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

Related stories'Crazy Ex-Girlfriend' Star Rachel Bloom on the Unsung MVPs of Season 1 (Consider This)Guillermo del Toro's Cold War Love Story: Michael Shannon & Sally Hawkins In Talks To ToplineTony Awards Nominations 2016: Michael Shannon, Michelle Williams & More Get Stage Nods »

- Vikram Murthi

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Michael Shannon Performs Pixies’ ‘Here Comes Your Man’ On Spike’s ‘Lip Sync Battle’—Watch

15 June 2016 10:26 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Character actor Michael Shannon is best known for his intense, visceral performances, often playing troubled, disturbed characters who exist on society’s margins. But like most contemporary actors, Shannon also has a soft, silly side that shows itself infrequently, like his appearance in the stoner holiday comedy “The Night Before,” his violent cameo in David Wain’s “They Came Together,” and his recent turn as Elvis in “Elvis and Nixon.” However, if for whatever reason you wanted to see Shannon lip sync on television, you will now have your chance. On Thursday’s episode of Spike TV’s “Lip Sync Battle,” Shannon will perform The Pixies’s 1989 song “Here Comes Your Man” off of their seminal album “Doolittle.” He will be facing off against “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend” creator and star Rachel Bloom. Watch a teaser for the performance above.

Read More: Interview: Michael Shannon Talks ‘Midnight Special,’ ‘Nocturnal Animals,’ Herzog’s ‘Salt And Fire’ & Working With Jeff Nichols

Shannon has been acting on stage and screen since 1991 after getting his start in Chicago theatre. He originated the role of Peter Evans in Tracy Letts’ acclaimed 1996 play “Bug,” which was later adapted into a 2006 film. He first came to attention for his role in “8 Mile,” playing the boyfriend of Eminem’s mother. He was nominated for a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his performance in Sam Mendes’ “Revolutionary Road,” co-starring opposite Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet. He gained further acclaim for his performances in the HBO series “Boardwalk Empire,” Jeff Nichols’ “Take Shelter” and “Mud,” “Premium Rush,” and most recently in “99 Homes” and “Midnight Special.”

Lip Sync Battle” airs Thursday night at 10pm Eastern on Spike TV.

Read More: Michael Shannon Reteams With Jeff Nichols For ‘Loving

Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

Related stories'Crazy Ex-Girlfriend' Star Rachel Bloom on the Unsung MVPs of Season 1 (Consider This)Guillermo del Toro's Cold War Love Story: Michael Shannon & Sally Hawkins In Talks To ToplineTony Awards Nominations 2016: Michael Shannon, Michelle Williams & More Get Stage Nods »

- Vikram Murthi

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Highlander, Catwoman, Thor and the secret of great action

13 June 2016 3:25 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Legendary stunt coordinator Andy Armstrong talks to us about his work on Highlander, Thor, Catwoman, and what makes a great action scene...

For over 40 years, Andy Armstrong has worked on a huge array of stunts and action sequences in TV and film. From directing 1,000s of extras in Stargate to a full body burn in Danny DeVito's Hoffa, Armstrong's experiences as a stuntman, stunt coordinator and unit director have taken him all over the world.

The brother of Vic Armstrong, the stunt coordinator and director who famously doubled for Harrison Ford in the Indiana Jones movies, Andy Armstrong's career began when he doubled for Sir John Mills on the 1970s TV series, The Zoo Gang. That early job jumpstarted a life in filmmaking which has taken in three James Bond movies, 90s action (Total Recall, Universal Soldier) and superhero movies (The Green Hornet, Thor, The Amazing Spider-Man).

Those 40 years of filmmaking experience are the pillar of Armstrong's book, the Action Movie Maker's Handbook. Intended as a reference for those thinking of starting a career in stunts or action unit directing, it also offers a valuable insight for those outside the industry, too. The book reveals the range of talents required to bring an effective action scene to the screen - organisation, storytelling, an understanding of engineering and physics - and how much input a coordinator and unit director has on how those sequences will look in the final film.

We caught up with Andy Armstrong via telephone to talk about his book and some of the highlights in his career so far. Read on for his thoughts on creating the action sequences in Thor and The Amazing Spider-Man, his hilarious behind-the-scenes memories from the 80s cult classic, Highlander, and what went wrong on the 2004 Catwoman movie...

Your book gave me a new appreciation for what second unit directors and stunt coordinators do. I didn't realise how much design work you do when it comes to action scenes, for example.

Yeah, it is true that a lot of people don't realise how much development goes into action. Especially nowadays, it's such a complex business. That becomes a huge part of it - the technicalities of it and the storytelling part of it. Some things might look great, but when you put them all together they don't necessarily work for that movie. A lot of what I've made a living doing is really creating action that is appropriate for the movie. Because the wrong type of action is just like the wrong costume or the wrong actor or something  - it just takes you out of the film.

You get a lot of movies that actually have too much action in them. Then what happens is, you can't appreciate it. It's like a feast where the starter is such a huge meal that you don't even want the main course because you're full. That's like so many action movies - they'd actually benefit from having some of the action taken out of them. I'm always fascinated when you see an audience in an action movie.

When I feel there's too much action in a movie, or it goes on for too long, I always look around in a cinema. It's interesting to see people chatting to each other or doing something else. You should never have that in an action movie. Action should be like sex or violence - you want to be left just wanting a bit more. That gets forgotten in a lot of movies, which are just relentless. Stuff going on the whole time.

What happens then is that, when it comes to something special for the third act, some fantastic fight or something, you can't raise the bar enough, because the bar's been high all the way through the movie. It's a weird thing.

They have to build, action scenes.

They do have to build, absolutely. That's why I do that little graph in the book, which is something I do in every movie, just to work out how much action there should be and where it should go and, on a scale of one to 10, how big it is. It's funny how crude that looks, and yet if you compare it to any of the really great action movies, they'll fit that graph. There'll be something at the opening, there'll be something happening at the end of the first act and into the second act, and there'll be bits and pieces happening in the second act and then a big third act finale. Whether it's a movie made in the 60s or now, that formula of action still becomes the sweet spot.

A lot of these superhero movies, there's some fantastic action going on, but by the end of the movie, nobody cares. You have nowhere to go with it.

Some of them are very long as well.

Far too long. Far, far too long. You're absolutely right. I think any movie, past two hours, has got to be either incredibly spectacular or it's an ego-fest for the filmmakers. Keeping somebody in a seat for more than two hours - you'd better have a really good tale to tell. And I don't think many of these modern ones do - they just have lots of stuff in them.

So what films have impressed you recently in terms of action?

Kingsman, definitely. I thought it was absolutely brilliant, a really good take on it. I loved that it was Colin Firth and not a traditional action hero that's covered in muscles and torn t-shirts and things. And for the same reasons, really, I love the Taken series of movies with Liam Neeson. I loved them, particularly because they're grounded in reality, or set just above reality. Obviously, Kingsman you go more above reality, but they're still grounded with real gravity and real people. It's a bit hypocritical, because I've made a great living doing some superhero movies, but they're not more favourite movies by any chance. I'm very proud of the work I've done on them, but the movies I love aren't even action, really. I haven't seen the third Taken, I need to get that, but I thought the first two Takens were really very cool.

I quite liked both the Red films. I was going to do the second one of those, because the guy who directed the second one is a friend of mine. So I'd have liked to have done that, but they wanted to go with the person they used on the first film. Dean Parisot is a very good friend of mine, I did Galaxy Quest with him. That's one of my favourites.

But a lot of movies I've seen lately, I've been underwhelmed by some of them. It's funny. I like tight little movies. I think it's a shame we've not had more John Frankenheimers making things like Ronin, you know. Great action but well placed - the right action in the right place. Again, grounded in reality, real people.

Do you think stunts go through trends? Obviously, you've recently been doing a lot of wire work on superhero movies lately.

Oh, absolutely. It's kind of gone in a tight full circle, because a few years ago action went fully CG, and then the brief we were given when we did the first Amazing Spider-Man is that they want to get away from that feel, to go more gravity based, more reality. That's what we spent a lot of time doing on that first Spider-Man is the way he jumps around. I based it on real physics.

Some of the stuff on the first Amazing Spider-Man I'm really very, very proud of. We filmed some groundbreaking rig systems and high-powered winches that moved around so there was a proper organic travel when Spider-Man jumps around. It's funny, because when I agreed to do the movie, that was the brief - they want to make Spider-Man's movement much more realistic. I said, "Yes, absolutely, we can do it." But when I came out of the meeting, I have to be honest - I had no idea how the hell we were going to do that.

We did a lot of testing. They were good enough to give us a lot of time to test. One of the things I did was bring in an Olympic gymnast, and I had him swing from three bars, from one bar to the next bar to the next bar, doing giant swings on them. I videoed it, because I knew that something on the original [Sam Raimi] Spider-Man didn't look right. It sounds really obvious in the end, because your eye goes straight to it, but when I brought the gymnast in, I realised that when you see a human swinging, their downward swing is really violent. It gets faster, faster, faster until it nearly pulls the arms out of the sockets, and then as they swing up it gets slower, slower, slower until they get negative. Then they grab the next bar and it happens again. It's the massive variation in velocity that made me realise, "I get it. That's what's real." Then you can tell it's a real guy. When you see Spider-Man and his speed is the same going down as it is going up, even though you haven't analysed it in your mind, you know that it's not right. It's like the five-legged horse syndrome: if you saw one standing in a field, even though you've never seen one in your life, you'd know that it's not something from nature. 

It's something I spend a lot of time doing, making things organic and real. In the book you've see a lot of reference to Buster Keaton and things, because I like to go back to that. When you've seen something done for real, then you can make anything as fantastic as you want. But you have to know where the baseline is, where real is, before you start doing something too spectacular. Or what will happen is, even though an audience has never seen an athlete on giant bars, or a guy swinging on a spider web, they'll know instinctively that it looks wrong. We're conditioned to do that - no matter how realistic a dummy in a shop window is, we know as humans that it isn't a real person. Animals know all that - they can spot their own species, they can spot other species and know what they are.

It's why, with a superhero movie, especially, I like to do a bible beforehand, so that you can have a reference. How strong is Spider-Man? Can he throw cars or push a building over? Can he just pick up a sofa? You have to have a yardstick of what people can do. Otherwise it's all over the place. We've seen those movies, where the power of the superheroes [varies]. One minute he gets knocked out by someone in a bar, the next he's pushing a house over.

It has to have some kind of internal logic, doesn't it.

It has to have some kind of logic, no matter how mad that logic is, it has to be consistent. We had it on Thor: how powerful is Thor? How much can he do with a hammer? What happens when the hammer really hits something? You have to have all these mad conversations at the beginning of the movie. If you see someone punch through a  building, it's tough to then see that same person slap someone in their face without tearing their head off. You need a yardstick to go to.

I was interested to read what you said about Catwoman, and the idea you had for the big fight.

Yeah, that was a classic case. In the end I was proved right. The movie could have been fantastic. Halle Berry - in the outfit, she could stop traffic. And she was such a perfect choice for Catwoman - she had all the abilities. The movement down, the whole thing. It was such a waste, because the script got crappier and crappier. There was a rewrite every week or so. Each one was worse than the last one. It was like someone was drinking and writing worse and worse versions of it. I feel sorry for Halle as well - I don't think it did her career any good. She's such a trooper anyway.

It's funny, I remember when I saw the first TV commercial for the movie, and I'd been a bit depressed - I don't like leaving movies. I remember coming out, and you always have that second thought as to whether you should have left it or not. But I'm quite strict about only doing good stuff. The interesting thing is, I fought to get the motorcycle sequence in there, and the directors and the producers - none of them wanted it. The moment I saw that first commercial, and it was nearly all motorcycle. I remember shouting at the screen that I was absolutely right. You know when they put that in the trailer that it's the only good thing in the movie! It's very funny. 

Why do you think that happens sometimes in these big Hollywood films, where you get this death spiral of script rewrites? You hear about it quite a lot.

Oh, God knows. If you could answer that I think you'd be a gazillionaire. A lot of these rewrites just get worse and worse. It's like cooking, putting this and that in, until you've got this inedible bowl of crap that's like the vision you originally set out to make. That happens so often. I think part of it happens in the main studio system because a lot of films get made by committee. That happens a lot. It didn't happen with some of the greats of the 50s, 60s and 70s, because some of those people were tyrannical, but the movies they made had a personal identity to them.

John Boorman doesn't always make great movies, but he's a great moviemaker and every movie he makes is a John Boorman movie. You look at Excalibur, you look at Deliverance, you look at Hope And Glory, they're all different, you can like them or not like them, but they have a real authority and identity to them. What happens in a studio system is you have a lot of junior executives and they all want to put a comment in there, they all want to use this actor or that actress. In the end, for right or wrong, a film has to have one real author. If it doesn't... there's the old saying that a camel is a horse designed by committee. That's what happens to movies. There are so many people in different areas in the studio that want to keep their fingers in the pie.

The big thing about studios is, most studio executives are all eventually going to get fired or run another studio or something. The rule of thumb is, most studio executives want to be just attached to a movie enough that if it's a huge success they can say they were or part of it, and they can point out the bits they changed or suggested or whatever. And if it's a Catwoman, they can distance themselves from it as if it were a disease. That's a real thing - a fine line executives work. Because you can get the blame for a picture that you may have had nothing to do with in some ways, you had no say in it if you were a studio executive, necessarily, and you can also get lots of praise and lots of awards and a million-dollar job at another studio because you're considered to be the guy or girl that brought this or that movie to the studio and it made $300m. It's a funny game, that.

In the end, who knows what's going to be successful? Who'd have thought movies like Fast & Furious would still be successful?

Yeah, there's gonna be eight or nine of them.

It's incredible. Vic [Armstrong] and I were offered, I guess it was three or four, and then they made a change with the action team and they've had the same action team since. But we'd just started Thor so we turned it down. It's funny because they went off and did more and more of those Fast & Furious films and we did the two Spider-Mans and Season Of The Witch and some other things. I think in the end we kind of made the right choice. I'm proud of the stuff I've done.

When you think of how advanced the look of Highlander was - Russell invented that look. The very long lenses, the very wide lenses. Fantastic cuts between things. It's absolutely timeless. I watched it again recently. It's as good now as it was when we made it. And it's a beautiful looking movie.

I'm really proud of the stuff I've done on it. It's amazing to think it's 30 years [old]. There's a lot of funny stories about Highlander. When they hired Sean Connery first of all as Ramirez, it’s funny because it's a Scotsman playing a Spaniard and a Frenchman playing a Scotsman! The funny thing is, Peter Davis and Bill Panzer, the producers, cast Connery - and the movie's called Highlander, so Connery thought he was playing the Highlander

He got some huge fee, and then they let him know that he's playing Ramirez, this Spanish guy. He went, "Oh fine", but his fee was the same - he got about a million dollars for however many weeks he was on the movie. And then Christopher Lambert, who'd only done Greystoke before, as far as English-speaking movies went, they cast him and hadn't met him. Apparently, when they did Greystoke, he learned his lines parrot fashion - he just learned the line he had to speak. He couldn't speak English. But he's such a lovely guy.

When they first met him and he answered "Yes" to every question, they realised he didn't know what the hell they were talking about. [Laughs] They were in a bar or restaurant, and Peter Davis and Bill Panzer both came outside, and they left him at the table, and said, "He can't fucking speak English!" And they'd already cast him! The deal was done! It was fantastic, you know?

It just shows you. He was so charismatic in that movie. He learned English during the movie and was brilliant.

He's also incredibly short-sighted, Christophe. I did some really cool sword fight sequences with him. He couldn't see the sword! Incredible. His muscle memory and ability to be taught a fight with his glasses on, and then take is glasses off and then shoot was absolutely astounding. I've never met anyone like it. He never missed a beat, and yet he couldn't see - he couldn't see which end of the sword he had a hold of. 

You look at those sword fights, and he's better than most stuntmen doing them. Yet he could hardly see his opponent, let alone the sword. Fascinating.

Clancy Brown, who played the villain, he's still a friend. He was fantastic. A couple of funny things happened on that, I think they're in the book. We were doing some car action in New York, and I had cameras on the front of the Cadillac. The Cadillac was my choice - originally it was written as a big four-wheel drive. I wanted something classically American that would slide around.

When we were towing it through town with the cameras on for the close-ups of the two actors, Clancy's there with his slit throat with the safety pins in it and all that, and I would jump off the back of the camera car when we got to a decent bit of road or bridge or something, and I'd turn all the cameras on.

At one point, I was turning the cameras on and the cop who was helping us - or supposed to be helping us in a typical sort of New York, aggressive cop way, said, "If you get off the camera car again, I'm going to arrest you."

Now, meanwhile, the cameras are rolling. I'm not really arguing with the cop, but I'm a bit pissed off to say the least. So I got back on the camera car. But while I'm doing that, Clancy, just dicking around, was [sings] "New York, New York!" And that was just him playing around. It was actually in response to me arguing with a New York cop, really.

Anyway, Russell, when he was putting the chase together, loved that little moment. He'd done all the Queen videos, and that's when Queen came in and saw it, and they loved it. So that's when they re-recorded their version of New York, New York and it became a hit record for Queen.

That's amazing.

It started as a mild confrontation between me and a rather aggressive New York cop! [Laughs] Whenever I see Clancy, we still laugh about it. It wasn't in the script or anything, it was just one of those things.

Andy Armstrong, thank you very much!

Action Movie Maker's Handbook is available from Amazon now.

See related  Does it matter whether stars do their own stunts? Speed 2: how a dream sparked one of the biggest stunts ever Olivier Megaton interview: Taken 2, Liam Neeson and stunts Sam Mendes interview: Skyfall, stunts & cinematography Movies Interview Ryan Lambie Andy Armstrong 14 Jun 2016 - 05:40 Highlander Catwoman The Amazing Spider-Man The Amazing Spider-Man 2 interview Andy Armstrong movies »

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Tom Hiddleston Still Insists He Won’t Be Playing James Bond

7 June 2016 10:45 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

There are so many rumors about the next James Bond film that it’s hard to know who to believe. Here’s what seems to be concrete at the moment, according to the trades. One: Daniel Craig is not necessarily done, but his preferred director Sam Mendes has moved on. Craig has said in the past that he didn’t […]

The post Tom Hiddleston Still Insists He Won’t Be Playing James Bond appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Edward Davis

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Working with Genius by Anne-Katrin Titze

7 June 2016 7:01 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

A Scott Berg, Michael Grandage, Nicole Kidman, Laura Linney, John Logan and Jude Law Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze Lionsgate and Roadside Attractions hosted a Museum of Modern Art premiere for Michael Grandage's Genius with Colin Firth, Jude Law, Nicole Kidman and Laura Linney, written by John Logan (Martin Scorsese's The Aviator, Oliver Stone's Any Given Sunday, Sam Mendes' Spectre and Skyfall), based on Max Perkins: Editor of Genius, by A Scott Berg. Dominic West as Ernest Hemingway, Guy Pearce as F Scott Fitzgerald and Vanessa Kirby as Zelda Fitzgerald round out their literary world.

John Logan on Scott Berg's Katharine Hepburn for Cate Blanchett: 'He absolutely offered some insight' Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze Angela Ashton, Joel Grey, Martha Plimpton, Oren Moverman, Kathleen Turner, Keith Urban, Spotlight screenwriter Josh Singer, Tom Wolfe, Zach Grenier, Elena Kampouris, Lilly Englert, Elena Rusconi, Laura Michelle Kelly, Tommy Tonge, Nan and Gay Talese, »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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News Bits: Avengers, Universal, Motel, Burn, Gun

7 June 2016 6:01 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Avengers: Infinity War

Alan Silvestri ("Forrest Gump," "Flight," "Cast Away") is returning to the fold with the award-winning composer reportedly confirmed to be doing the scores for both parts of the "Avengers: Infinity War" saga at Marvel Studios.

Silvestri joined the McU with the score for "Captain America: The First Avenger" and followed that up a year later with "The Avengers," but hasn't been involved since. [Source: Cbm]

Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures has put aside three release date slots in the near future for what it's dubbing major event films. Sadly it is not announcing the titles for the projects, but it has locked in three dates: August 10th 2018, January 18th 2019 and April 10th 2020.

It's known this list does not include the various Universal monster franchise films in the works which already have dates, or the "Jurassic World" sequel which is set for June 22nd 2018. [Source: Collider]

The Voyeur's Motel

Krysty Wilson-Cairns ("Penny Dreadful, »

- Garth Franklin

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Sam Mendes’ ‘Voyeur’s Motel’ Movie Finds Writer

6 June 2016 2:48 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

DreamWorks has hired Krysty Wilson-Cairns to write the screenplay for its adaptation of Gay Talese’s “The Voyeur’s Motel” with Sam Mendes directing and producing.

Steven Spielberg is also producing. It’s the fourth movie that Mendes, who directed the James Bond movies “Skyfall” and “Spectre,” has directed for DreamWorks following “American Beauty,” “The Road to Perdition” and “Revolutionary Road.”

Mendes will also produce through his Neal Street banner with Steven Spielberg. Julie Pastor will oversee for Neal Street and Holly Bario for DreamWorks.

DreamWorks won an auction in April for the rights to Talese’s book, based on the life of Colorado resident Gerald Foos, who opened a hotel so he could watch guests having sex. Talese met Foos in 1980 and agreed to a confidentiality agreement that Foos voided in 2013 after selling the hotel.

An excerpt of “The Voyeur’s Motel” ran in the April 11 issue of the »

- Dave McNary

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‘The Voyeur’s Motel’ Moving Forward, Sets Scribe With Krysty Wilson-Cairns

6 June 2016 11:17 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Exclusive: Krysty Wilson-Cairns is set to write the film adaptation of Gay Talese's The Voyeur’s Motel which Sam Mendes will direct and produce at DreamWorks Pictures with Steven Spielberg also producing. The hot project that was taken off the market for close to $1M two months ago is being adapted from Talese’s upcoming book (to drop July 12 from Grove Press) and his April 11th New Yorker article The Voyeur's Motel. Cairns is becoming an old pro, having recently adapted… »

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Potential options to replace Daniel Craig as 007

6 June 2016 4:17 AM, PDT | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

Go figure folks. Last week I posted a speculative piece looking at who could direct the next James Bond film now that Sam Mendes is out of the picture, and of the numerous folks I listed, only one realistic option (not counting Christopher Nolan, who is basically a pipe dream) turns out to be in the early conversation. That of course, is Danny Boyle, though some reports have Susanne Bier as the frontrunner. Today though, I’m looking at what could go down if Daniel Craig doesn’t return as 007. As such, I’ve again amassed a list of players for a position within this franchise. Read on to find out more, but keep in mind that this is purely guesswork on my part and isn’t meant to be taken too seriously, at least not yet… First off, keep in mind that Craig isn’t 100% out of the picture yet. »

- Joey Magidson

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The Week in Movies – Batman v Superman slammed by star, Disney unhappy with Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, first look at Hugh Jackman in Wolverine III and more…

5 June 2016 11:44 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The Week in Movies discusses the last seven days in cinema, including Alfred actor Jeremy Irons’ very critical comments of his own movie Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, rumours of Disney being unhappy with Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, the first set photos of Hugh Jackman filming Wolverine III and much, much more…

The Week in Movies is an excerpt from the weekly Flickering Myth Super Newsletter. Subscribe here to get it delivered to your inbox every Sunday.

The stormtroopers are metaphors for studio interference.

Some people read inches upon inches of newspaper columns detailing the secret back-stabbings and dodgy dealings of political circles. Others consume glossy magazine after glossy magazine about the latest messy celebrity break-up and reality TV star meltdown.

But us? We love backstage production troubles.

“Everything’s fine here. Move along.”

It all began on Tuesday, with reports that Disney were very unhappy with »

- Oli Davis

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Tom Hiddleston Downplays James Bond Rumors

5 June 2016 10:26 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Over the past few weeks, two things have become exceedingly clear about the future of James Bond. Firstly, Spectre was considered such a creative whiff that very few of those involved, including director Sam Mendes and star Daniel Craig, are all that interested in coming back for another outing. Secondly, there have been early discussions with a few actors about the possibility of one of them coming aboard to fill Craig’s shoes, taking on the role of 007.

Beyond that, the rumor mill has been churning away, singling out everyone from Aidan Turner to (popularly) Tom Hiddleston as the heir apparent to the James Bond throne. But now, Hiddleston, whose recent role on AMC’s The Night Manager was largely seen as a miniseries-sized audition for the part, is pouring some cold water on red-hot rumors that he’s about to take Bond’s Aston Martin for a spin.

At Wizard World Philadelphia this weekend, »

- Isaac Feldberg

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Aidan Turner now reportedly favourite for next James Bond

5 June 2016 4:45 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

With Daniel Craig now seemingly all but confirmed as exiting the James Bond franchise, speculation is running wild as to his successor in the role of 007.

It’s recently been reported that Tom Hiddleston is in “advanced talks” with Eon Productions about portraying the super spy in Bond 25 (which could potentially reunite him with The Night Manager director Susanne Bier), while there’s also been word that Fantastic Four star Jamie Bell has had discussions with producer Barbara Broccoli.

The bookmakers had recently closed the betting on Hiddleston nabbing the role, however Ladbrokes has now installed a new odds-on favourite in Aidan Turner (Poldark, The Hobbit), with a Ladbrokes spokesperson stating that: “Money talks, and it’s the Poldark man that punters want as their next Bond. Turner’s been shaking and stirring the betting for the last week and it’s not a huge surprise to see he’s been backed into odds-on. »

- Gary Collinson

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Tom Hiddleston Denies James Bond Rumors

4 June 2016 3:43 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Last week, a report surfaced that Tom Hiddleston was in "advanced talks" with Eon Productions to take over the 007 role from Daniel Craig in James Bond 25. That report was never confirmed, but it did reveal that Tom Hiddleston hasn't even received an official offer for the role quite yet, so it may be quite some time before we learn who the new Bond is. Tom Hiddleston himself appeared at a convention over the weekend, where he he essentially shot down those rumors.

Tom Hiddleston appeared at Wizard World Philadelphia this weekend with his Thor: Ragnarok co-star Chris Hemsworth, where the moderator teased that he may be announced as the next James Bond. After the raucous applause died down, Tom Hiddleston broke the bad news to the fans, although he was grateful for their enthusiasm. Here's what he had to say below, courtesy of a YouTube video from the Wizard World panel. »

- MovieWeb

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Tom Hiddleston's Blunt Response To James Bond Rumors

4 June 2016 2:01 PM, PDT | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

The James Bond franchise is in a state of limbo at the moment. After the most recent film, Spectre, was met with mixed to negative reviews, everything seemed to halt. While James Bond movies are almost always financial winners, poor reception can really throw a wrench into an otherwise successful franchise. It was recently announced that director Sam Mendes was departing the Bond world, after directing both Skyfall and Spectre. To add to this chaos, Daniel Craig has been heavily rumored to be departing, meaning that the next Bond flick will need both a star and director. With Daniel Craig's announcement of departure being a dark cloud above the entire franchise, fans have been speculating possible replacements. Perhaps the most popular of these new Bonds is none other than Loki himself, Tom Hiddleston. Hiddleston recently appeared on a panel at Wizard World Philadelphia, where he was asked if he »

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The Night Manager director Susanne Bier in contention for Bond 25

2 June 2016 1:15 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

With Sam Mendes confirming that he’s now finished with the James Bond franchise, the Radio Times is reporting that The Night Manager director Susanne Bier is reportedly on the shortlist to direct Bond 25, potentially becoming the first female to take the reins of the long-running spy franchise.

Should Bier nab the director’s chair for 007’s next adventure, she could find herself reuniting with Night Manager star Tom Hiddleston, who is said to have had “advanced talks” with Eon Productions about succeeding Daniel Craig in the role.

As yet, there’s been no official word on the future of the Bond franchise, but it looks increasingly likely that Daniel Craig has called time on the role, with the actor said to have turned down a $100 million offer for two more movies.

»

- Gary Collinson

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Movie News: Will This Woman Direct 'James Bond 25'? ; Next 'Friday the 13th' Will Reboot Origin Story

1 June 2016 12:00 PM, PDT | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

James Bond 25: Susanne Bier, who directed the Academy Award winning In a Better World (above), is on the short list of candidates to direct the next installment in the James Bond spy series. She recently directed the acclaimed spy miniseries The Night Manager, starring Tom Hiddleston, who is reportedly in talks to play James Bond. Bier also worked with Sam Mendes (Skyfall, Spectre) on her 2007 movie Things We Lost in the Fire (below). [RadioTimes]   Friday the 13th: Last we heard, Aaron Guzikowski (Prisoners) was hired to write a new script for a planned reboot of the Friday the 13th horror movie series. Now producer Brad Fuller says that the script features "an origin that no one has seen before. Obviously Pamela’s there, but it’s a little bit...

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- Peter Martin

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Rumor: The Night Manager director being eyed to helm next James Bond film

1 June 2016 8:06 AM, PDT | JoBlo.com | See recent JoBlo news »

It remains to be seen if Daniel Craig is actually finished playing James Bond, however we do know that Sam Mendes, who was behind the camera for Skyfall and Spectre, definitely won't be back to direct the 25th installment of the franchise, and now Radio Times is claiming they've heard that The Night Manager director Susanne Bier is one of the leading to contenders to helm the next Bond movie.... Read More »

- Jesse Giroux

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