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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 1999 | 1997 | 1992

1-20 of 26 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Mike Leigh on Abigail’s Party at 40: 'I was sure it would sink without trace'

24 February 2017 1:00 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

In 1977, over an epic Chinese meal, Mike Leigh was persuaded to return to theatre. It was supposed to be a quick, forgettable job but became a hot ticket and triumphed on TV. He looks back at a play born from frustration with suburbia

“‘It isn’t the done thing!” This neurotic mantra echoed mercilessly throughout my suburban childhood and teenage years. My parents were obsessed by it, as were so many well-meaning but misguided mums and dads of the stultifying postwar years. Of course, what we were unable to understand or consider at the time was the brutal chaos and insecurity the second world war had inflicted on their lives. They’d been to hell and back, and now they hung on relentlessly to an idea of an unshakeable order and material respectability. Behave! Conform! Don’t step out of line! Wear a tie! Use Brylcreem! And of course, we war babies, »

- Mike Leigh

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Oliver Stone and the Cast of ‘Snowden’ Discuss the Challenges of Tackling a Historic Decade

22 February 2017 12:19 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor’s Note: This post is presented in partnership with Spectrum. Catch up on this year’s Awards Season contenders and the latest films On Demand. Today’s pick is “Snowden.”]

The opening titles of “Snowden” explain that the film dramatizes events from 2004 to 2013, but the film was clearly designed to speak to audiences years after that.

Snowden” is the latest effort from polarizing filmmaker Oliver Stone, who finds himself back in familiar territory, in a firmly political realm. It’s the story behind Edward Snowden’s rise through the CIA before his 2013 whistleblowing efforts, all the way up through the events detailed in Laura Poitras’ documentary “Citizenfour.”

In addition to tackling the timeline that took Snowden from army recruit to figure of global import, “Snowden” contextualizes the full scope of his revelations. What doesn’t come through in heated arguments and hushed conversations is on display in hypnotic sequences of psychedelic digital networks, all made up of personal data.

Bouncing around the nine years of Snowden’s life up until his public reveal is a tricky proposition. But using the »

- Steve Greene

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Berlin Film Review: ‘Ghost Hunting’

18 February 2017 11:33 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Having already indulged an exercise of soul-baring filmed psychoanalysis with “Fix Me,” director Raed Andoni extends his outdated idea of therapy to others in “Ghost Hunting,” an ethically problematic documentary in which Palestinian men recreate the circumstances of their incarceration and torture by the Israeli occupiers. Using the largely debunked notion that acting out one’s trauma is a means towards catharsis, Andoni has his various “actors” verbally and physically abuse one another while he watches from the side, exchanging the charge of narcissism that accompanied his previous doc with that of sadism.

Glowing pre-premiere praise from Ken Loach and Mike Leigh, the sensationalized emotional charge of the subject, plus Berlin’s best documentary prize means “Ghost Hunting” will garner far more attention than it deserves. The concept must have sounded hard-hitting and original on paper, considering the number of respected funding bodies — Doha, Sundance, Sanad, Venice’s Final Cut, »

- Jay Weissberg

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How ‘Denial’ Star Timothy Spall Almost Went Mad to Play ‘Mr. Turner’ For Mike Leigh

17 February 2017 10:59 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor’s Note: This post is presented in partnership with Spectrum. Catch up on this year’s Awards Season contenders and past winners On Demand. Today’s pick is “Denial.”]

There’s acting and then there’s losing yourself to a role. Timothy Spall came very close to the latter in bringing legendary British painter J.M.W. Turner to the screen for Mike Leigh’s “Mr. Turner.”

The biopic marks Leigh’s first one in 15 years, following 1999’s “Topsy-Turvy,” in which Spall, a Leigh regular, played a supporting role. He’s front and center in “Mr. Turner.” At 57 years-old, the longtime character actor is finally receiving his due for his towering performance that earned him the Best Actor award at Cannes, where the film world premiered to glowing reviews earlier this year.

“The character is supreme” in all of the British filmmaker’s works, Spall told Indiewire. To prepare for the role, Spall did a ton of research that dated back to the painter’s childhood. “The character dictates how it should be played,” Spall said.

Spall said the »

- Nigel Smith

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David Rose obituary

15 February 2017 8:09 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Producer of Z Cars for BBC Television who later became the driving force behind Channel 4’s Film on Four movie output

When Channel 4 was launched in 1982, its brief was to be distinctive and innovative. As a senior commissioning editor and then head of drama until 1990, David Rose, who has died aged 92, took up that challenge for the movies produced under the banner of Film on Four, with many successes including Neil Jordan’s Angel (1982) and Mona Lisa (1986), David Leland’s Wish You Were Here (1987) and Mike Leigh’s High Hopes (1988).

Two decades earlier, Rose had been breaking new ground at BBC Television, as the first official producer of its police series Z Cars, and he went on to invigorate regional drama for the corporation. Among the writers whose talents he nurtured were Alan Plater, David Rudkin and Alan Bleasdale – and David Hare was astonished and delighted by his boldness. »

- Philip Purser and Jeremy Isaacs

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Berlinale 2017: The Party Review

14 February 2017 5:20 PM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Stefan Pape

 

Sally Potter returns to the silver screen with a wickedly fast-paced, endearingly transient comedy that, while unashamedly overstated, is grounded by its connections to modern British politics – making it all rather apt for this picture to thrive in its farcicality. The monochrome aesthetic may give this piece a timeless feel, but it seems like a particularly pertinent presentation of a nation who currently find their left wing politics in turmoil.

The film opens with Kristin Scott Thomas as Janet, pointing a gun at the camera. Rewind an hour or so, and we learn she’s the host of a dinner party, inviting friends round to celebrate her recent promotion to shadow health minister, and its a dinner party, we have already gathered, that is to eventually turn sour. Her husband Bill (Timothy Spall) is in a peculiar mood, not exactly one for conversation – but the arrival of »

- Stefan Pape

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Scott Reviews Ermanno Olmi’s The Tree of Wooden Clogs [Criterion Blu-ray Review]

14 February 2017 2:34 PM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

As the art film revolution of the late 1950s and 1960s gave way to more populist manifestations of its stylistic inventions, so too did the “foreign language drama” become a codified form. As Bergman, Antonioni, Kurosawa, Fellini, and other renowned directors of that earlier time aged out of their peak years of financial viability, a new class found a framework in which to ground their career. They didn’t always have the training in commercial art that their forerunners had worked in and helped develop before eventually resisting, subverting, or overthrowing, but they had the stamina and the work ethic to invest in the trappings that made earlier more revolutionary works so galvanizing.

Ermanno Olmi made his start in documentary shorts, making more than two dozen from 1953-1959, before making his feature narrative debut with Time Stood Still (1959), an avalanche drama about a generational divide. He gained considerably more acclaim for 1961’s Il Posto, »

- Scott Nye

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Arrival,’ ‘The Edge of Seventeen,’ ‘The Tree of Wooden Clogs’ & More

14 February 2017 6:50 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Arrival (Denis Villeneuve)

Within the alien subgenre, there lies another. Therein, knowledge is treasure and the fifth dimension is love. The major rule: once the mystery and the chills have subsided, the revelations are enlightening and the welcomes warm. Thankfully, Denis Villeneuve‘s Arrival is more worthwhile than that. The film juggles a bit of world-building with meaty, compelling characters while trying to make linguistics look cool. No easy task, but the film does so in a breeze »

- The Film Stage

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Asghar Farhadi’s ‘The Salesman’ to Get Free Oscar-Night Premiere in London

14 February 2017 6:27 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Asghar Farhadi’s Oscar-nominated Iranian drama “The Salesman” will receive a free open-air premiere in London on Feb. 26, the night of the Oscars ceremony. London mayor Sadiq Khan will host the screening as part of his ‘London is open’ campaign, celebrating the British capital’s diversity.

The screening will see London’s iconic Trafalgar Square transformed into a public cinema for an audience of up to 10,000 people just hours before the start of the Academy Awards in Los Angeles, where “The Salesman” is nominated for best foreign language film.

“Screening ‘The Salesman’ in Trafalgar Square has a great symbolic value for me,” said Farhadi. “The gathering of the audience around ‘The Salesman’ in this famous London square is a symbol of unity against the division and separation of people. I welcome and appreciate this invaluable show of solidarity.”

Farhadi announced last month that he would not attend the Oscars in »

- Robert Mitchell

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Free screening of 'The Salesman' planned in London to protest Trump travel ban

14 February 2017 5:59 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The film’s director Asghar Farhadi is boycotting the Oscars in protest over Us immigration policy.

Oscar-nominated Iranian film The Salesman will be screened in Trafalgar Square for free to demonstrate London’s “openness to the World”.

The film’s director Asghar Farhadi has already said he will boycott this year’s Academy Awards over Donald Trump’s executive orders on immigration, which restricted travel from seven predominantly Muslim counties, including Iran.

The open-air screening will take place on 26 February, the same day as the Oscars, and has been organised by London mayor Sadiq Khan, actor Lily Cole, producer Kate Wilson and film-maker Mark Donne.

Khan told London paper The Evening Standard: “Londoners have always prided themselves on their openness to the world, and what better way to do that than to come together to watch this powerful film in one of the world’s most famous public spaces.”

The screening, for up to 10,000 people »

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Berlin Film Review: ‘The Party’

13 February 2017 10:30 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It may have its uses in describing butter cookies and cat videos, but it’s fair to say that “short and sweet” is an over-applied compliment: Sometimes it’s better to be short and severely, cheek-shrivelingly sour. So it proves in “The Party,” a deliciously heightened, caviar-black comedy that sets up its brittle, bourgeois characters like bowling pins and gleefully knocks them down in 71 minutes flat. Slight and self-contained, it won’t go down in cinema history as anything but, perhaps, the most purely fun film ever made by peculiar British experimentalist Sally Potter. Still, this sketch of an ambitious Westminster politician and dinner-party hostess (Kristin Scott Thomas), whose life comes spectacularly apart before the canapés are even served, is a consummate drawing-room divertissement, played with relish by a dream ensemble. Notwithstanding a somewhat strained twist, it’s as slender, sharp and snappish as a wishbone; chic arthouse distributors should »

- Guy Lodge

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Mel Brooks to be honoured with BAFTA Fellowship at the British Academy Film Awards

8 February 2017 8:32 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The British Academy of Film and Television Arts has announced that legendary actor and filmmaker Mel Brooks is set to be honoured with the BAFTA Fellowship at the Ee British Academy Film Awards this Sunday, February 12th.

Brooks, who began his career in the 1940s, is one of only twelve people to have won an Oscar, Emmy, Grammy and Tony Award, and his C.V. includes the likes of The Producers, Blazing Saddles, Young Frankenstein, Silent Movie, Spaceballs and Robin Hood: Men in Tights.

“I am not overwhelmed, but I am definitely whelmed by this singular honor,” said Brooks. “To be included among such iconic talents is absolutely humbling. In choosing me for the 2017 Fellowship I think that BAFTA has made a strangely surprising yet ultimately wise decision.”

Mel Brooks is a truly unique and multi-talented filmmaker,” added Amanda Berry, Chief Executive of BAFTA. “We are absolutely thrilled to award him the Fellowship, »

- Gary Collinson

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Mel Brooks to receive the 2017 Bafta fellowship

8 February 2017 7:35 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The actor and director of The Producers says he is ‘not overwhelmed but definitely whelmed’ by lifetime achievement award

Mel Brooks is to be the recipient of this year’s Bafta fellowship, it has been announced.

Awarded in recognition of “an outstanding and exceptional contribution” to film, the fellowship is in effect Bafta’s lifetime achievement award; Brooks follows previous awardees such as Sidney Poitier, Mike Leigh and Helen Mirren. The fellowship is also given in the areas of TV and video games, and was first bestowed in 1971, to Alfred Hitchcock.

Continue reading »

- Andrew Pulver

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Mel Brooks to Receive BAFTA Fellowship

8 February 2017 2:21 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Mel Brooks has been named this year’s recipient of the British Academy of Film and Television Arts’ Fellowship, it was announced Wednesday. The actor, director and producer will receive the award from Prince William, the Duke of Cambridge, who serves as president of BAFTA, at the British Academy Film Awards, which take place at London’s Royal Albert Hall on Sunday.

Mel Brooks is a truly unique and multi-talented filmmaker. We are absolutely thrilled to award him the Fellowship,” said Amanda Berry, chief executive of BAFTA.

The BAFTA Fellowship is the body’s highest honor. It recognizes an individual who has made an outstanding and exceptional contribution to film, television or games. Recent recipients include Terry Gilliam, Vanessa Redgrave, Christopher Lee, Martin Scorsese, Alan Parker, Mike Leigh and last year’s honoree Sidney Poitier.

“I am not overwhelmed, but I am definitely whelmed by this singular honor,” said Brooks. »

- Robert Mitchell

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Paul Thomas Anderson, Daniel Day-Lewis’ Fashion Drama Rounds Out Cast

1 February 2017 4:49 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Lesley Manville and Vicky Krieps have joined Daniel Day-Lewis in the Paul Thomas Anderson’s untitled film about the world of high fashion in 1950s London.

Production began this week in the U.K. for Focus Features, which announced in September that it had obtained worldwide rights to the project.

Manville has been in several of Mike Leigh’s films including “Secrets and Lies” and “Another Year,” for which she received a BAFTA Best Actress nomination. Krieps’ credits include “A Most Wanted Man” and Focus FeaturesHanna.

Focus will distribute the film in the U.S. later this year with Universal Pictures handling international distribution. The film’s producers are JoAnne Sellar; Megan Ellison, through her Annapurna Pictures; and Paul Thomas Anderson. The executive producers are Peter Heslop, Adam Somner, and Daniel Lupi. Chelsea Barnard and Jillian Longnecker are overseeing production for Annapurna.

The collaboration between Anderson and Day-Lewis »

- Dave McNary

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Newswire: Paul Thomas Anderson movie begins filming, might have a name

31 January 2017 9:52 AM, PST | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Production has begun on Paul Thomas Anderson’s eighth film, and it might even have a title now: Phantom Thread. A local website in the small coastal Yorkshire town of Whitby has posted some photos from the set of the film, including at least one that includes that title. (Internet detectives also found an LLC matching the name, though of course it could always change.) The facts as we know them: The film is about the fashion industry in London, is set in the 1950s, and stars Daniel Day-Lewis. The last time Daniel Day-Lewis starred in a film, he won the Best Actor Oscar. (That’d be for Lincoln.) The last time Anderson and Day-Lewis worked together, they made one of the greatest films of all time. (That’d be There WIll Be Blood.) Phantom Menace Thread also features Lesley Manville (who’s been in a bunch of Mike Leigh »

- Josh Modell

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Lesley Manville and Richard Graham Join Paul Thomas Anderson’s Next Film

31 January 2017 7:48 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

At long last, Paul Thomas Anderson and Daniel Day-LewisThere Will Be Blood reteam — which is set in the 1950s fashion industry in London — began production over the last few days, but aside from some photographic proof, Focus Features have been silent regarding the additional cast and crew. With a working title of Phantom Thread, a few readers have done some digging and we’ve got a few more members to add to the ensemble.

First up, taking a page from Mike Leigh’s handbook, Lesley Manville (Secrets & Lies, Another Year) and Richard Graham (Vera Drake, Titanic) have both joined the film, as noted on talent agency pages. An actress spotted in set photos has also been identified as Vicky Krieps (A Most Wanted Man, Hanna). For hailing from Luxembourg, she’d certainly fit the initial casting net of “young actresses of Eastern European descent” for the female lead, so »

- Jordan Raup

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Cohen Media Group Launches New Classic Film Series With Chuck Workman Documentary ‘What Is Cinema?’

27 January 2017 4:00 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Turner Classic Movies and Robert Osborne are getting some healthy competition as Cohen Media Group launches ‘Cohen Film Classics,’ a new classic film series, hosted and curated by Cmg CEO and consummate cinephile Charles Cohen. The series premieres Friday night, with Academy Award winning filmmaker Chuck Workman’s 2013 documentary, “What is Cinema?”

Workman’s documentary combines archival interviews with film visionaries such as Chantal Akerman, Robert Bresson, Robert Altman, and Akira Kurosawa, along with newly conducted ones with Mike Leigh, David Lynch, and Jonas Mekas. In their own words, the filmmakers explore the meaning of the art to which they have devoted their lives.

Read More: ‘Downton Abbey’ Creator Julian Fellowes Reveals He’s Working on a Film Version

Following the premiere of “What Is Cinema?,” the series will show these four films every Friday in February: “Sudden Fear,” from 1952, featuring Joan Crawford and Jack Palance, “Hangmen Also Die,” Fritz Lang »

- Jude Dry

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Curzon to receive Bafta for outstanding contribution to cinema

17 January 2017 2:10 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Cinema chain and distribution label to be recognised at this year’s Bafta ceremony.   

Arthouse cinema group Curzon will receive the outstanding British contribution to cinema award at the 2017 Bafta film awards (held on 12 February).

Curzon operates a network of 15 independent cinemas, as well as distribution label Curzon Artificial eye and video-on-demand platform Curzon Home Cinema.

The innovative cinema brand opened in 1934 with the Curzon Mayfair and now has venues in Soho, Canterbury and Sheffield.

Distribution label Curzon Artificial Eye, which celebrated its 40th anniversary last year, champions new and classic cinema from Britain, Europe and around the world.

Its catalogue includes works by Andrei Tarkovsky, Satyajit Ray, Claire Denis, Charlie Chaplin, Lynne Ramsay, Michael Haneke and Mia Hansen-Løve.

Philip Knatchbull, CEO of Curzon, said: “I’m delighted that Curzon’s contribution to film has been recognised by Bafta. Curzon has a long and proud history in the British film industry and many talented and passionate people »

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Curzon to receive Bafta for outstanding British contribution to cinema

17 January 2017 2:10 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Cinema chain and distribution label to be recognised at this year’s Bafta ceremony.   

Arthouse cinema group Curzon will receive the outstanding British contribution to cinema award at the 2017 Bafta film awards (held on 12 February).

Curzon operates a network of 15 independent cinemas, as well as distribution label Curzon Artificial eye and video-on-demand platform Curzon Home Cinema.

The innovative cinema brand opened in 1934 with the Curzon Mayfair and now has venues in Soho, Canterbury and Sheffield.

Distribution label Curzon Artificial Eye, which celebrated its 40th anniversary last year, champions new and classic cinema from Britain, Europe and around the world.

Its catalogue includes works by Andrei Tarkovsky, Satyajit Ray, Claire Denis, Charlie Chaplin, Lynne Ramsay, Michael Haneke and Mia Hansen-Løve.

Philip Knatchbull, CEO of Curzon, said: “I’m delighted that Curzon’s contribution to film has been recognised by Bafta. Curzon has a long and proud history in the British film industry and many talented and passionate people »

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 1999 | 1997 | 1992

1-20 of 26 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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