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Jason Lee Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (2) | Spouse (2) | Trade Mark (3) | Trivia (15) | Personal Quotes (11) | Salary (1)

Overview (3)

Date of Birth 25 April 1970Orange, California, USA
Birth NameJason Michael Lee
Height 6' 1½" (1.87 m)

Mini Bio (2)

Born in Orange, California in 1970, Jason Lee is an American actor and film photographer. Well known for his professional skateboarding career in the very pivotal late 80s and early 90s, Lee would go on to pursue acting in 1993. He has worked in film, television, and voiceover, and with such directors as Kevin Smith, Cameron Crowe, Lawrence Kasdan and Brad Bird. Retiring from skateboarding in 1995, Lee has maintained solid ties to the industry, most notably through his partnership with longtime friend and fellow ex-professional skateboarder, Chris Pastras, and their now 25-year-old skate brand, Stereo Skateboards, which Lee co-manages with Pastras.

In 2001, Lee dove headfirst into film photography and has been an active photographer and film advocate ever since, having had his work both published and exhibited throughout the years. In October 2016, Lee published a selection of small and large format Polaroid and Fuji instant film photographs spanning a decade as a special limited hardbound issue of Fort Worth-based Refueled Magazine. Only 500 signed and numbered copies were produced, and the issue quickly sold-out. Volume 2 of the 2-volume set, to be released in 2017, will be comprised of 4x5 color photographs made throughout Texas, where Lee currently resides with his wife, Ceren, a textiles and fashion designer, musician and mother.

Lee is also the subject of a forthcoming documentary from director Greg Hunt that will take the viewer on the road with him as he exposes his remaining sheets of now-expired 8x10 Polaroid films, a favorite medium of Lee's, and one that is no longer being produced. An accompanying book of the large format Polaroids will be published, with the originals being exhibited. In 2017/2018, Lee will also be publishing and exhibiting selections of B&W slide film photographs that were made over the past 10 years. The print collections, one with its focus primarily on the West and Southwest, and the other being strictly California photographs, will consist of close to 200 combined images.

He is also the founder of @filmphotographic, an Instagram film community gallery and resource page. "It's been an incredible tool for showcasing the work of film photographers from around the world, as well as helping photographers connect," says Lee.

While acting may come and go, the one constant has been and will continue to be his passion for photography and the ever present drive to grow his body of work. "It's quite common that a creative person will often have a few outlets or interests or passions, but will gravitate toward one in particular in a unique way. For me, that has been photography, and for almost 16 years now. Not since the skateboarding days have I found something so invigorating, so fulfilling," Lee says. "While I still enjoy acting and being a part of the bigger process, nothing quite compares to individual creative endeavors. And once I got locked into photography, it's really all I think about and desire to do. But I've had some pretty great opportunities as an actor, was able to make some movies for my kids, and have the experience of being on a really unique and enjoyable comedy series. But just as with skateboarding, photography is something much more personal, and more fitting to my creativity. It will always be the driving force."

Follow Lee on Instagram at @jasonlee, @stereoskateboards, and @filmphotographic

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Core PR

Born in Orange, California in 1970, Jason Lee is an American actor and film photographer. Well known for his professional skateboarding career in the very pivotal late 80s and early 90s, Lee would go on to pursue acting in 1993. He has worked in film, television, and voiceover, and with such directors as Kevin Smith, Cameron Crowe, Lawrence Kasdan and Brad Bird. Retiring from skateboarding in 1995, Lee has maintained solid ties to the industry, most notably through his partnership with longtime friend and fellow ex-professional skateboarder, Chris Pastras, and their now 25-year-old skate brand, Stereo Skateboards, which Lee co-manages with Pastras.

In 2001, Lee dove headfirst into film photography and has been an active photographer and film advocate ever since, having had his work both published and exhibited throughout the years. In October 2016, Lee published a selection of small and large format Polaroid and Fuji instant film photographs spanning a decade as a special limited hardbound issue of Fort Worth-based Refueled Magazine. Only 500 signed and numbered copies were produced, and the issue quickly sold-out. Volume 2 of the 2-volume set, to be released in 2017, will be comprised of 4x5 color photographs made throughout Texas, where Lee currently resides with his wife, Ceren, a textiles and fashion designer, musician and mother.

Lee is also the subject of a forthcoming documentary from director Greg Hunt that will take the viewer on the road with him as he exposes his remaining sheets of now-expired 8x10 Polaroid films, a favorite medium of Lee's, and one that is no longer being produced. An accompanying book of the large format Polaroids will be published, with the originals being exhibited. In 2017/2018, Lee will also be publishing and exhibiting selections of B&W slide film photographs that were made over the past 10 years. The print collections, one with its focus primarily on the West and Southwest, and the other being strictly California photographs, will consist of close to 200 combined images.

Lee is also the founder of @filmphotographic, an Instagram film community gallery and resource page. "It's been an incredible tool for showcasing the work of film photographers from around the world, as well as helping photographers connect," says Lee.

While acting may come and go, the one constant has been and will continue to be his passion for photography and the ever present drive to grow his body of work. "It's quite common that a creative person will often have a few outlets or interests or passions, but will gravitate toward one in particular in a unique way. For me, that has been photography, and for almost 16 years now. Not since the skateboarding days have I found something so invigorating, so fulfilling," Lee says. "While I still enjoy acting and being a part of the bigger process, nothing quite compares to individual creative endeavors. And once I got locked into photography, it's really all I think about and desire to do. But I've had some pretty great opportunities as an actor, was able to make some movies for my kids, and have the experience of being on a really unique and enjoyable comedy series. But just as with skateboarding, photography is something much more personal, and more fitting to my creativity. It will always be the driving force."

Follow Lee on Instagram at @jasonlee, @stereoskateboards, and @filmphotographic

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Core PR

Spouse (2)

Ceren Alkac (1 July 2008 - present) (2 children)
Carmen Llywelyn (1995 - 2001) (divorced)

Trade Mark (3)

Distinctive Raspy Voice
Often cast by Kevin Smith
Often references Burt Reynolds in his work

Trivia (15)

Dropped out of high school to be a pro skate boarder.
Professional skateboarder. Retired from skateboarding in 1996 after being pro for 7 years.
Owner of Stereo manufacturing Corp. (Skateboard company)
Was cast as Loki in Dogma (1999), but had to take a smaller part (Azrael) because of scheduling conflicts, so the role went to Matt Damon. His performance as Azrael would lead to him being cast in The Incredibles (2004)
Mentioned a number of occasions in the autobiography of skating legend Tony Hawk, "Hawk: Occupation Skateboarder".
Given a shoe deal from Airwalk during his skateboarding days.
Attended Ocean View High School, (Huntington Beach, CA).
Became infamous for naming his son 'Pilot Inspektor'.
He has the ability to cross and un-cross his right eye. He does this frequently in My Name Is Earl (2005), usually while Earl is angry or intoxicated.
Godfather of Kevin Smith's daughter, Harley Quinn Smith.
Was listed as a potential nominee on the 2008 Razzie Award nominating ballot. He was suggested in the Worst Actor category for his performances in the films Alvin and the Chipmunks (2007) and Underdog (2007). He failed to receive a nomination however.
Has voiced both a hero and a villain in Disney films - he played the voice of the title character in Underdog (2007) and was the voice of maniacal madman "Syndrome" in Disney/Pixar's The Incredibles (2004).
His daughter, born in 2008, is named Casper.
During an interview with friend Kevin Smith, Lee stated that he was inspired to become an actor by the Coen brothers' film, Barton Fink (1991), particularly by Steve Buscemi's performance as "Chet".
He has appeared in seven films directed by Kevin Smith: Mallrats (1995), Chasing Amy (1997), Dogma (1999), Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back (2001)_, Jersey Girl (2004)_, Clerks II (2006) and Cop Out (2010).

Personal Quotes (11)

On working with Lawrence Kasdan and Cameron Crowe, and Writer-Directors in general: I'd love to establish relationships with other writer-directors, too, but Chasing Amy (1997) is what got things going for me, and I'll always stick by Kevin.
On his performance as a rock star in Almost Famous (2000): "I wanted to be very serious about being a musician -- a guy who cares a lot about the music and the band and why we did it in the first place. We wanted to show an actual passion on stage with the intent of turning on the audience."
(On skateboarding injuries) I have scars on my knees from smashing into the corner of cement benches. I have scars on my pelvis from jumping off my board and sliding like Superman down a hill. One time I snapped my wrist in half and had to get a cast on my arm. Like an idiot, I skated before the cast was taken off, and I fell again and broke my other arm. For the next three months I had to brush my teeth using only my thumb and pinkie.
(2006 quote on fame) When you reach a certain status in Hollywood, you have to play a lot of games to stay in the limelight. It becomes more about being famous than being an actor. It's a cult of personality. Who's the It person this week? Who has the hottest girlfriend and the most bling-bling? Who showed up at the MTV Video Music Awards in a Hummer limousine? For me it's always more rewarding when people come up to me and say, "I loved you in Mumford. What's your name again?" That's how I've always wanted it to be.
(On My Name Is Earl (2005) and the perks of doing TV) The best thing about Earl is the steady income. I can do films if and when I want, as opposed to doing a film I don't really believe in because I have to pay the bills. I've never been at a Vince Vaughn or Ben Stiller level, so I don't get offered a lot of starring roles in comedy blockbusters. I've done some independent films that I'm proud of, but it's seven weeks of work for not much money. So then you have to find as many acting jobs as you can, just to keep up financially. "Earl" came along at the right time for me.
(On getting into acting) I was just curious about it, in much the same way you might be curious about how cars are made or how to get to the moon. It was naiveté. My girlfriend's mother was a talent manager, and when I told her I wanted to do movies, she said, "Okay, let's give it a shot." So many people would have said, "Oh, I don't know. Let's get you into some acting classes first and see how it goes." That would have been a bit deflating, and I think I would've lost interest.
(On retiring from skateboarding) When I decided to retire, I thought I was getting a little too old to be skating for a living. There was a lot of pressure to be at the top of my game all the time, and my heart just wasn't in it anymore. But I haven't given up skating completely. I still cruise around now and then just for fun. I'm way past my prime, so nobody expects much from me anymore.
(On My Name Is Earl (2005)) I was apprehensive about doing TV, because I didn't want to be known for a certain character. When I did Kissing a Fool (1998) with David Schwimmer, I realized how trapped he was by his role on Friends (1994). Everywhere we'd go, people would shout out to him, "Ross! Hey, Ross!" It's difficult to get away from the shadow of a TV character. I hope I've done enough movies that I won't be pigeonholed as "Earl" for the rest of my life.
[2010, on My Name Is Earl (2005) being canceled and landing Memphis Beat (2010)] I definitely miss "Earl" and working on the show. It was a shame the way they canceled it. We didn't get to finish the series. I was devastated; we were all confused. But I guess life goes on and now here I am working on something entirely different.
[on acting work before landing Mallrats (1995)] The most I ever did, really, was a small walk-on part in Mi vida loca (1993). I had done a Sonic Youth video that Spike Jonze shot where I was skateboarding. I flew to Malaysia to do skateboarding double work for a British Petroleum commercial. Other than that, I had headshots over the years here and there, and nothing ever came of it.
(2000 quote on his acting success) The day I become the jaded, cynical, asshole actor that takes it all for granted, doing parts just for money, is the day I get the fuck out of acting for good. I'll never let that happen.

Salary (1)

A Guy Thing (2003) $3,000,000

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