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John Lasseter Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (2) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trade Mark (4) | Trivia (24) | Personal Quotes (8)

Overview (2)

Date of Birth 12 January 1957Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, USA
Birth NameJohn Alan Lasseter

Mini Bio (1)

John Lasseter was born on January 12, 1957 in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, USA as John Alan Lasseter. He is a producer and director, known for Toy Story (1995), Cars (2006) and Toy Story 3 (2010). He is married to Nancy Lasseter. They have five children.

Spouse (1)

Nancy Lasseter (? - present) (5 children)

Trade Mark (4)

Nearly all of his films have hidden visual in-jokes with regards to Pixar, Disney, etc. Examples include:Toy Story (1995), A Bug's Life (1998), Toy Story 2 (1999), and Cars (2006).
Colorful visual design
Uses music by Randy Newman
Hawaiian shirts or shirts with colorful designs

Trivia (24)

Academy Award for special achievement for Toy Story (1995), 1995.
Educated at California Institute of the Arts in Valencia.
Introduces the DVD release of Hayao Miyazaki's Castle in the Sky (1986) (Castle in the Sky), one of his favorite films.
Ranked #1 in Premiere's 2004 annual Power 100 list with Pixar CEO Steve Jobs. They had ranked #23 in 2003 and #31 in 2002.
He won his first award at the age of five when he won $15.00 from the Model Grocery Market in Whittier, California, for a crayon drawing of the Headless Horseman.
While attending California Institute of the Arts, he produced two animated films, both winners of the Student Academy Award for Animation, Lady and the Lamp in 1979 and Nitemare in 1980.
In 2004, he was honored by the Art Directors Guild with its prestigious "Outstanding Contribution To Cinematic Imagery" award, and received an honorary degree from the American Film Institute.
He was a member of the Computer Division of Lucasfilm Ltd. (which was later sold and became Pixar), where he designed and animated the computer-generated Stained Glass Knight character in the Steven Spielberg-produced film Young Sherlock Holmes (1985).
Ranked #3 on Premiere's 2005 Power 50 List with Pixar founder Steve Jobs. They had ranked #1 in 2004.
Member of the Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (Short Films and Feature Animation Branch) [2005-]
Has 5 sons.
Is a big fan of Hayao Miyazaki, who is a close personal friend
Vice President of Pixar.
Ranked #1 on Premiere's 2006 "Power 50" list with Pixar/Disney executive Steve Jobs. They had ranked #3 in 2005 and #1 in 2004.
Admitted that whenever Pixar has encountered a creative problem, they look to Miyazaki's films for inspiration.
While at LucasFilm, he worked with Sam Leffler, who was the author/editor of "The Unix System Manager's Manual". At Leffler's request, Lasseter created a cartoon version of "Beastie", the daemon mascot of BSD Unix, to appear on the book cover; Lasseter would reprise the character for two later books. Although Lasseter didn't create Beastie, and several other artists have interpreted the character over the years, his rendering has proven to be one of the most popular and endearing versions.
Five days after Toy Story (1995) opened in theaters, he was on a trip with his family and upon getting off a plane, he saw a little boy with a Woody doll, which was enough to convince Lasseter how successful the film was.
He loves spy movies, especially the Jason Bourne trilogy.
Decided to be an animator as a child after spending $.49 to watch The Sword in the Stone (1963) in a theater.
Favorite movie is Dumbo (1941).
His first job at the Disney Animation studio was the introduction of Copper in The Fox and the Hound (1981). He even collaborated with Glen Keane on the climactic fight scene.
He has an extensive collection of vintage toys and model trains. He also has an extensive collection of Hawaiian shirts, most of them have his iconic Pixar characters.
He wore a Scottish kilt to the premiere of "Brave".
In Toy Story, Woody was based on a pull string Casper that John owned when he was a boy. Buzz was a based on a G.I. Joe action figure that John also owned when he was a kid.

Personal Quotes (8)

When I was in high school I read this book called 'The Art of Animation', by Bob Thomas. It's all about the Walt Disney studio and the making of Sleeping Beauty. I read this and it dawned on me - wait a minute, people do animation for a living?
We make the kind of movies we want to see, we love to laugh, but I also believe what Walt Disney said 'for every laugh there should be a tear'. I love movies that make me cry, because they're tapping into a real emotion in me, and I always think afterwards 'how did they do that?'
From the beginning, I kept saying it's not the technology that's going to entertain audiences, it's the story. When you go and see a really great live-action film, you don't walk out and say 'that new Panavision camera was staggering, it made the film so good'. The computer is a tool, and it's in the service of the story
Andrew Stanton always said that 2-D animation became the scapegoat for bad storytelling. But you can make just as bad of a movie in 3-D.
Let me tell you a funny story. I took the family to see this film one weekend - I'll go to see almost any film that's good for the whole family. And so we're sitting there watching this film, which I won't name, and there are long stretches that are just not very entertaining. My little son - he was probably 6 at the time - was sitting next to me, and right in the middle of this dull section, he turns to me and says, "Dad? How many letters are in my name?" I must have laughed for five minutes. I thought, Oh, man, this movie has lost this little boy. His mind has been wandering, trying to figure out how many letters there are in his name. So I told my wife, Nancy, what he said, and she started laughing, and then the story went down the row through my whole family, our four other sons, and we're sitting there as a family giggling and laughing. And I thought to myself, If ever a child anywhere in the world leans over to their daddy during one of my movies and asks, "How many letters are in my name?" I'll quit.
[about Hayao Miyazaki] Miyazaki is one of the greatest filmmakers of our time and he has been a tremendous inspiration to generations of animators At Pixar, when we have a problem and we can't seem to solve it, we often look at one of his films in our screening room. Toy Story owes a huge debt of gratitude to the films of Mr. Miyazaki.
[Of 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs'] The animation of the dwarfs themselves is something pretty much impossible to achieve in computer animation. That fluidity, that squash and stretch, that kind of stuff - it just works in hand-drawn animation.
Everything I do in my life is because of Walt Disney, and how he entertained me as a child and as a young adult growing up.

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