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He Walked by Night

Do you think older crime thrillers weren’t violent enough? This shocker from 1948 shook up America with its true story of a vicious killer who has a murderous solution to every problem, and uses special talents to evade police detection. Richard Basehart made his acting breakthrough as Roy Martin, a barely disguised version of the real life ‘Machine Gun Walker.

He Walked by Night

Blu-ray

ClassicFlix

1948 / B&W /1:37 flat full frame / 79 min. / Street Date November 7, 2017 / 39.99

Starring: Richard Basehart, Scott Brady, Roy Roberts, Whit Bissell, James Cardwell, Jack Webb, Dorothy Adams, Ann Doran, Byron Foulger, Reed Hadley (narrator), Thomas Browne Henry, Tommy Kelly, John McGuire, Kenneth Tobey.

Cinematography: John Alton

Art Direction: Edward Ilou

Film Editor: Alfred De Gaetano

Original Music: Leonid Raab

Written by John C. Higgins and Crane Wilbur

Produced by Bryan Foy, Robert T. Kane

Directed by Alfred L. Werker

Talk about a movie with a dynamite
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Lumière Festival: ’Gertie the Dinosaur,’ ‘Professor Balthazar’ Reanimated After Restorations

Lumière Festival: ’Gertie the Dinosaur,’ ‘Professor Balthazar’ Reanimated After Restorations
Lyon, France — The Lumière Film Festival’s International Classic Film Market put the spotlight on conservation and restoration of classic animated films on Wednesday, offering an examination of both the challenges and opportunities for cinematheques, private companies and other rights holders.

Marco de Blois, artistic director, programmer and curator at Quebec’s Cinémathèque Québécoise, presented two high-profile shorts that had long been thought lost but whose restoration he is now overseeing: the original versions of Winsor McCay’s 1914 “Gertie the Dinosaur” and Norman McLaren’s 1942 “Hen Hop.”

A version of “Gertie the Dinosaur” released in late 1914 still exists and is known as the first animated film to not only feature a dinosaur but also a character that exhibited diverse emotions.

McCay, however, had used an earlier version of the short with additional scenes in front of a live audience as part of his vaudeville act in which he interacted with Gertie. A 1913 issue
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Here's the Perfect Austin City Limits Music Festival Playlist

  • BuzzSugar
Oct. 6 begins the first of two weekends of the Austin City Limits Music Festival in Texas, headlined by Jay-z, Red Hot Chili Peppers, and The Killers. The roster of performers for the longstanding festival is massive and varied, so you're guaranteed to find something you like. Whether or not you're headed to Austin this weekend or next to see the festival, this playlist featuring 35 of the artists will get you in the mood - or convince you to buy the ticket next year so you don't miss out. RelatedAll the Snacks to Pack For a Music Festival So You Don't Go Broke "Izzo / In the End" - Jay-z and Linkin Park "Californication" - Red Hot Chili Peppers "Mr. Brightside" - The Killers "White Flag" - Joseph "I Know a Place" - Muna "Pumped Up Kicks" - Foster the People "Clint Eastwood" - Gorillaz "Don't Touch My Hair" - Solange Knowles
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Tommy Lee Jones Told Jim Carrey ‘I Cannot Sanction Your Buffoonery’ While They Were Making ‘Batman Forever’ — Watch

  • Indiewire
Tommy Lee Jones Told Jim Carrey ‘I Cannot Sanction Your Buffoonery’ While They Were Making ‘Batman Forever’ — Watch
In case you were wondering, that bizarre Jim Carrey interview from a few weeks back wasn’t an anomaly. The man who brought us Ace Ventura and the Mask still believes that none of us exist and nothing matters, though he does seem to take it all in stride during his appearance on “Norm Macdonald Live.”

After joking about the fact that “every once in a while, somebody you really admire hates your guts,” Carrey reveals two people who weren’t fans of him: Chuck Jones and Tommy Lee Jones.

Read More:Jim Carrey Gets Existential at Fashion Week: ‘There’s No Meaning to Any of This’ — Watch

He worked with the latter on the ill-fated “Batman Forever,” in which he played the Riddler to Jones’ Harvey Dent/Two-Face. “I went over and I said, ‘Hey Tommy, how you doin’?’ and the blood just drained from his face like he
See full article at Indiewire »

Veteran Voice Actress June Foray Remembered by Lily Tomlin, More at Packed Event

Legendary animator Chuck Jones once said, "June Foray is not the female Mel Blanc. Mel Blanc was the male June Foray." High praise indeed, and high praise there was in abundance at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater on Tuesday night — one day after what would've been June Foray’s 100th birthday — as nearly a thousand of her closest friends, co-workers and family members gathered to share warm and funny stories about the First Lady of Animation.

For those who might have trouble placing the name, Foray, who died July 26 at age 99, was the Emmy-winning voice of Rocky the...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Barry Jenkins Shares Charming Story About Meeting Greta Gerwig For ‘Lady Bird’ Premiere

  • Indiewire
Barry Jenkins Shares Charming Story About Meeting Greta Gerwig For ‘Lady Bird’ Premiere
Last fall, Barry Jenkins was a little-known filmmaker with one feature under his belt, 2008’s “Medicine for Melancholy.” Then he premiered future best picture winner “Moonlight” at the 2016 Telluride Film Festival and everything changed. At the 2017 edition, he returned the favor, not only introducing a series of short film programs at the festival as he has for years, but also by presenting another rising filmmaker to the world.

Read More:‘Lady Bird’ Trailer: Saoirse Ronan Delivers Her Greatest Work in Greta Gerwig’s Brilliant Directorial Debut

Just a few hours after receiving a standing ovation for one of his short film programs, Jenkins took the stage at the Chuck Jones Cinema for the world premiere of “Lady Bird,” the coming-of-age comedy that marks the solo directorial debut of veteran actress Greta Gerwig. There was a practical connection between “Lady Bird” and “Moonlight,” in that both movies share A24 as a distributor.
See full article at Indiewire »

Great Job, Internet!: Read This: The mistake Chuck Jones couldn’t get over in “What’s Opera, Doc?”

  • The AV Club
Warner Bros. cartoons are still amazingly enjoyable, especially considering they all had the same basic plot: Wile E. Coyote chases Road Runner. Sylvester chases Tweety Bird. And Elmer Fudd hunts for his ultimate prey: the uncatchable Bugs Bunny. Obviously, the scenario changed up a bit from time to time, but never so successfully as in Chuck Jones’ 1957 faux opera, “What’s Opera, Doc?”

A new article on animation website The Dot And Line tells the story of the cartoon that 1,000 animators rated the greatest of all time in 1994. Dot And Line calls it “a laughably loose adaptation of Richard Wagner’s Die Walküre; Jones took the operatic pomp of Norse mythology and superimposed it onto the classically cartoonish circumstance of Elmer Fudd attempting to kill Bugs Bunny.” Valuable perspective comes from Stephen Fossati, director Chuck Jones’ last protégé. For his masterpiece, as well as his final ...
See full article at The AV Club »

June Foray obituary

Us voiceover artist best known for Rocket ‘Rocky’ J Squirrel and Natasha Fatale of The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show

Audiences would not recognise June Foray, who has died aged 99, nor would they recognise her voice. But they would recognise instantly many of the hundreds of voices Foray created in a career that spanned 85 years, most notably those of the heroic flying squirrel, Rocket J Squirrel, and the sinister spy, Nastasha Fatale, pitched perfectly to the off-the-wall humour of The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show.

Foray was dubbed the First Lady of Voicing. When the director Chuck Jones proposed in 2000 that she be given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, someone suggested Foray was a female Mel Blanc, the artist who provided most of the voices for Jones’s Warner Bros cartoons, including Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and friends. Jones replied: “No. Mel Blanc was the male June Foray.”

Continue reading.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Cartoon Voice Legend June Foray Has Died at 99

  • Slash Film
Cartoon Voice Legend June Foray Has Died at 99
While you may not know the name June Foray, you undoubtedly know the voice that belongs to the legendary cartoon actress. Unfortunately, the woman behind iconic cartoon characters such as Rocky the Flying Squirrel from Rocky & Bullwinkle and little Cindy Lou Who in the Chuck Jones adaptation of How the Grinch Stole Christmas, has […]

The post Cartoon Voice Legend June Foray Has Died at 99 appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

June Foray, Voiceover Actress Behind Rocky the Flying Squirrel, Dead at 99

June Foray, Voiceover Actress Behind Rocky the Flying Squirrel, Dead at 99
June Foray, the Emmy-winning voiceover actress who brought Rocky the Flying Squirrel and Natasha Fatale to life in The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show, has died. She was 99.

Per our sister site Variety, Foray’s death was confirmed via Facebook by close friend Dave Nimitz, who wrote, “With a heavy heart… I want to let you all know that we lost our little June today at 99 years old.” A cause of death has not been disclosed.

In addition to her work on Rocky and Bullwinkle, Foray voiced Cindy Lou Who in Chuck JonesHow the Grinch Stole Christmas, and demonic doll
See full article at TVLine.com »

June Foray, Voice of Rocky and Natasha from The Bullwinkle Show, Dies at 99

  • PEOPLE.com
June Foray, Voice of Rocky and Natasha from The Bullwinkle Show, Dies at 99
June Foray, the voice of Rocky the Flying Squirrel and Natasha Fatale from The Bullwinkle Show, died Thursday. She was 99.

Foray, known as the first lady of acting, played various characters on the screen from the Looney Tunes‘ Witch Hazel, Nell from Dudley Do-Right, Granny in Tweety and Sylvester, and Cindy Lou Who in Chuck Jones’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas.

A close friend of Foray’s, Dave Nimitz, confirmed her death on Facebook, writing, “With a heavy heart again I want to let you all know that we lost our little June today at 99 years old.”

Foray won a
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Newswire: R.I.P. legendary voice actress June Foray

  • The AV Club
June Foray, the voice of Rocky The Flying Squirrel, Granny from Looney Tunes, and literally hundreds of other beloved animated characters, has died. Heralded as “the first lady” and the “queen” of voice acting, Foray’s career in film and TV stretched for 71 years and more than 300 credits, embodying everyone from Magica De Spell to Dorothy from The Wizard Of Oz. As reported by Variety, Foray was 99.

Originally working in radio—and on comedy albums with Stan Freberg—Foray broke into film in 1950, when she voiced Lucifer the cat in Disney’s Cinderella. From there, it would probably be easier to list the beloved animated series she didn’t appear on: Her versatile voice showed up in The Flintstones, Peter Pan, Mister Magoo, dozens of Looney Tunes shorts—with director Chuck Jones supposedly once noting that “June Foray is not the female Mel Blanc, Mel Blanc ...
See full article at The AV Club »

June Foray, Voice of ‘Bullwinkle Show’s’ Natasha and Rocky, Dies at 99

June Foray, Voice of ‘Bullwinkle Show’s’ Natasha and Rocky, Dies at 99
June Foray, the voice of “The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show’s” Rocky the Flying Squirrel and his nemesis Natasha Fatale of Boris and Natasha fame in the early 1960s and a key figure in the animation industry, died Thursday. She was 99.

Her close friend Dave Nimitz, confirmed her death on Facebook, writing “With a heavy heart again I want to let you all know that we lost our little June today at 99 years old.”

Foray was also the voice behind Looney Tunes’ Witch Hazel, Nell from “Dudley Do-Right,” Granny in the “Tweety and Sylvester” cartoons and Cindy Lou Who in Chuck Jones’ “How the Grinch Stole Christmas,” among hundreds of others.

The first lady of voice acting, one of the original members of animation organization Asifa-Hollywood and founder of the annual Annie Awards, was also instrumental in the creation of the Oscars’ animated feature category.

“We are all saddened by the news of June’s passing,” said
See full article at Variety - TV News »

June Foray, Voice of ‘Bullwinkle Show’s’ Natasha and Rocky, Dies at 99

June Foray, Voice of ‘Bullwinkle Show’s’ Natasha and Rocky, Dies at 99
June Foray, the voice of “The Bullwinkle Show’s” Rocky the Flying Squirrel and his nemesis Natasha Fatale of Boris and Natasha fame, died Thursday. She was 99.

Her close friend Dave Nimitz, confirmed her death on Facebook, writing “With a heavy heart again I want to let you all know that we lost our little June today at 99 years old.”

Foray was the voice behind Looney Tunes’ Witch Hazel, Nell from “Dudley Do-Right,” Granny in the “Tweety and Sylvester” cartoons and Cindy Lou Who in Chuck Jones’ “How the Grinch Stole Christmas,” among many others.

The first lady of voice acting and founder of the annual Annie Awards was instrumental in the creation of the Oscars’ animated feature category.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Grinch: first pic from new CG reboot

Brendon Connelly May 24, 2017

Benedict Cumberbatch is voicing The Grinch. And here's what he'll look like...

Illumination - the folks behind the Despicable Me films, of course - have been showing off some of their key characters to licensors over the past week, the better to encourage the continued manufacture, distribution, sale, enjoyment and, eventually, landfill-clogging destruction of their merchandise. And in a new piece of artwork - that you can see at the top there, and in full down at the bottom - that's been placed as an advert in Global License, we get our first look at the studio's CG take on The Grinch, from next year's The Grinch Who Stole Christmas do-over.

Following Boris Karloff, sort-of-Tim Curry, Jim Carrey and Seth Green, the latest actor to play (well, voice in this instance) Dr. Seuss' immortal, Christmas-derailing hermit, will be Benedict Cumberbatch. Seems only natural. Shame that
See full article at Den of Geek »

The 20 Best Horror Films Of The 21st Century, From ’28 Days Later’ to ‘Get Out’

  • Indiewire
The 20 Best Horror Films Of The 21st Century, From ’28 Days Later’ to ‘Get Out’
We live in scary times that can often feel like lot more unsettling than any fictional horror movie, but some of the best horror movies tap into real world terrors — and that’s especially true of the highlights from the last two decades of the genre, one of the most varied in its history. From graphic depictions of gory showdowns to subtler looks at psychological dread, the best horror movies of the 21st century typically focused on a handful of people struggling to survive a dark force beyond their comprehension. Who can’t relate to that? Here are 20 of the most potent examples, ranked from top to bottom.

20. “The Descent” (2005)

Neil Marshall’s economical monster movie takes place almost exclusively within the confines of a shadowy cave and the terrible, terrible things lurking within it. After a gradual beginning in which coworkers and friends venture into a cave during their
See full article at Indiewire »

Will Smith up for the Genie in Disney’s live-action Aladdin?

According to various reports, Will Smith is being sought to play the role of Genie in the planned Disney remake of their classic 1992 animated Aladdin movie. The Aladdin remake is being directed by Guy Ritchie for Walt Disney Studios and Smith is in line to play the role made famous by Robin Williams in the original. More on the Will Smith Aladdin news below.

Sony Pictures

The 1992 Aladdin movie was itself based on Aladdin and the Magic Lamp from One Thousand and One Nights and was brought to the screen by Disney legends John Musker and Ron Clements, who most recently directed Moana. The Guy Ritchie remake will cast unknowns in the two lead roles of Aladdin and Princess Jasmine but will need a big star for the part of the Genie, something that Will Smith obviously is.

Deadline reported first on the Will Smith Aladdin news, saying that the
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Tom McGrath interview: Boss Baby, animation, George Lucas

Simon Brew Apr 5, 2017

We chat with Boss Baby director Tom McGrath about animation, changes at DreamWorks, Boss Baby 2, advice from Ron Howard and more...

Tom McGrath is one of Hollywood’s most underappreciated comedy directors. Megamind was a hoot, I found myself guffawing heavily through the Madagascar trilogy and now, with The Boss Baby, he’s brought yet more animated mischief to the screen.

We got the chance to have a chat with about the movie, about the big behind the scenes changes at DreamWorks Animation, and the invaluable advice of Ron Howard and George Lucas

I remember watching the Oscars one year, and Jim Carrey came on to present an award just as Liar Liar had opened to massive numbers. He walked up and said “how was your weekend, mine was good!”. So, Tom McGrath: how was your weekend?

It was great! It was good! [Laughs] You know, I don’t have children myself,
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Boss Baby – Review

Sibling rivalry can really put a family through the ole’ ringer, really it can be “H-e-double hockey sticks. But for writers it’s heaven sent, a ready to order formula for drama with a conflict going way, way back to Cain and Abel. It certainly works for all movie genres and formats, even the animated feature films. While a great majority of cartoon heroes and heroines are solo offspring from single parent homes (like Belle and Jasmine) and others are orphans (Aladdin and Mowgli), there have been some siblings mixed in there. There were 99 dalmatians, Ariel had several sisters, and both Wendy Darling and Princess Merida had rambunctious brothers. Oh, and we can’t forget the sister superstars, Elsa and Anna of Frozen (although many parents may want to after hearing “Let it Go” on a near continuous loop). Now comes an animated tale of two brothers with the rivalry ramped to a fever pitch,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

How DreamWorks Animation Went Retro with ‘The Boss Baby’ 2D Fantasies

  • Indiewire
How DreamWorks Animation Went Retro with ‘The Boss Baby’ 2D Fantasies
For DreamWorks director Tom McGrath (the “Madagascar” franchise), “The Boss Baby” not only provided a personal story about sibling rivalry and corporate displacement, with Alec Baldwin voicing a Trump-like corporate bully, but also the opportunity to create a separate 2D graphic design for several fantasy sequences.

“I think we’ve forgotten our roots a little bit [with CG],” McGrath told IndieWire. “But since we were doing a movie about a 7-year-old’s imagination, we could be very stylized, very abstract, and very colorful. And we had our heroes of animation from the ’40s, ’50s, and ’60s to drawn on: Maurice Noble, Mary Blair, Ward Kimball, and Chuck Jones.”

Read More: ‘The Boss Baby’ and ‘Ghost in the Shell’ Fight for Second Behind the Unstoppable ‘Beauty and the Beast’

After dabbling in a 2D sequence for “Madagascar 3,” McGrath experimented further with 2D environments inside the mind of his protagonist, Tim Templeton (voiced by
See full article at Indiewire »
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