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10 Things We Learned From HBO's 'Spielberg' Documentary

10 Things We Learned From HBO's 'Spielberg' Documentary
Susan Lacy's documentary Spielberg debuts October 7th on HBO, trots out an all-star team of interviewees – from film critics to famous friends, the Toms (Cruise and Hanks) to God herself, a.k.a. Oprah Winfrey. The voices film buffs will undoubtedly want to hear from the most, however, belong to his fellow "movie brats": Francis Ford Coppola, Brian De Palma, George Lucas and Martin Scorsese, who all talk at length about their heady New Hollywood days alongside Spielberg in the early Seventies. All of them partied together, bounced
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘The Night Manager 2’ and other unnecessary sequels

Richard Roper is locked up. His evil arms business has been shut down and the dashing Night Manager of the title survived with his hair in place and good looks intact. The end of the acclaimed BBC miniseries, based on the book by John Le Carré, brought with it an enormous sense of satisfaction. The story began. It held us enthralled for a few weeks. Then sadly it finished.

Or did it? Director Susanne Bier recently announced that development has begun on a follow-up script. It seems the broadcaster is thinking in terms of a franchise, and I for one am anxious. The original tale was so well told, what good could come from elaborating on it? In this era of binge-watching, it isn’t always the best idea to give viewers a tele-visual trough to gorge from. Surely sometimes one rattling good yarn is enough.

As the BBC head
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Firelight Media Launches Impact Producer Fellowship & Names Inaugural Honorees

Credit: Firelight Media’s Twitter account

Firelight Media has introduced the Impact Producer Fellowship and announced the initiative’s inaugural participants, Shadow and Act reports. “The first-ever training program dedicated to mentoring and training impact producers of color,” the yearlong fellowship will see eight Impact Producers developing campaigns with filmmakers.

The inaugural Impact Producers are Jin Yoo-Kim, Jumoke Balgun, Sam Tabet, Julien A.Terrell, Iliana Sosa, Ani Mercedes, Tracy Rector, and Carmen Dixon.

The Impact Producer Fellowship “is rooted in a core belief that by providing social change activists with training on media strategy and impact, and connecting them with diverse storytellers, we can fuel change efforts and catalyze new narratives about vulnerable populations,” writes the Firelight blog. Retreats and monthly online roundtables with filmmakers and other industry execs are among the Impact Producers’ training activities.

“The inaugural cohort of Impact Producer Fellows bring with them trusted relationships in diverse communities and social justice movements, cultural competency, and a proven commitment to social change,” explained fellowship director Sonya Childress.

We aim to build on those assets and provide them with the skills and networking that will position them as narrative strategists who can strengthen both the nonfiction film community and the movements they serve,” she continued.

Programs like the Impact Producer Fellowship are sorely needed in the entertainment industry. According to the 2017 Diversity Report from the Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies at UCLA, “initiatives focused on developing diverse creative executives” are few and far between — and are usually designed for writers of film and TV.

So, obviously, we’re thrilled that Firelight is doing its part and contributing to “an area in dire need of improvement” by training and mentoring an inclusive group of up and coming producers.

The inaugural Impact Producers’ bios are below, courtesy of Shadow and Act.

Jin Yoo-kim — Los Angeles, CA

Jin Yoo-Kim is currently co-producing filmmaker Yu Gu’s feature documentary, A Woman’s Work, following the NFL cheerleaders’ fight for wage equality. Some of her past directorial film projects range in subject matter from an underground student movement fighting racism in the administration, the prophetic dreams pregnant Korean women have, the raw vegan subculture, Korean immigrants navigating the Us healthcare system, Asian American women attempting to define their sexuality, and a bio-pic of a struggling Korean American indie musician. She worked for documentary filmmakers like Bill Guttentag and Rory Kennedy, and is most excited about working with Yu Gu and Elizabeth Ai on A Woman’s Work. Jin was born in Bolivia (the poorest country in South America) but is of Korean descent and as a result, her passion for immigrant stories and global social inequality was sparked. Through film, she hopes to bridge the difference gap between people, cultures, socioeconomic status, races, and nations.

Jumoke Balogun — Washington, D.C.

From a groundbreaking report focused on ending the criminalization of Lgbtq youth of color, to an award-winning public history exhibition that debunked accepted truths about World War I, to a website that challenged the official government narrative of Hurricane Katrina, Jumoke Balgun has spent the entirety of her career finding compelling ways to elevate the dignity of people of color. She does this by writing, creating media strategies, and designing digital content that highlight the genius of the most impacted. She has done this on Capitol Hill, in rural Mississippi, upstate New York, Little Haiti in Miami, Seattle–Tacoma International Airport, New Orleans and at the White House. Currently a writer living in Washington D.C., Balgun was most recently an advisor to the U.S. Secretary of Labor in the Obama Administration and she is excited to gain new tools as a Firelight fellow.

Sam Tabet — Brooklyn, NY

Sam Tabet is a Brooklyn based creative producer and cinematographer. Sam produced Southwest of Salem: The Story of the San Antonio Four (Tribeca Film Festival, HotDocs, Idfa 2016) which had its television premiere on Investigation Discovery to one million viewers this fall. The critically acclaimed film helped exonerate the ‘San Antonio Four’. Sam was also the assistant producer for award-winning feature documentary Call Me Kuchu (Berlin Film Festival, HotDocs 2012) and produced Signified, a multi-media archive of Lgbtq testimony featuring the work of queer artists and activists. Sam previously worked at Chicken & Egg Pictures, NewFest and American Documentary, Pov, and hold a B.A. from Connecticut College in Film and Gender studies. Sam is a founder of the Queer Producers Collective.

Julien Terrell — Philadelphia, Pa

Julien A.Terrell was born and raised in Harlem where he first developed his passion for social justice. He began organizing on issues of gentrification and environmental justice in Buffalo and NYC connecting this work to the preservation of cultural and community spaces. From 2008–2016, he worked with young people at organizations such as Youth Ministries for Peace and Justice,The Brotherhood Sister Sol, and The School of Unity and Liberation (Soul), focusing on how organizing and art can be used to develop leadership and analysis. As a member of The Yuri and Malcolm Mural Project and The Argus Project, he develops community engagement programming with a focus on collective determination and liberation. Julien currently lives in Philadelphia with his partner and daughter and continues his social justice work through their cultural organizing collective called Village Funk.

Iliana Sosa — Austin, TX

Iliana is a filmmaker based in Austin, Texas. She was born and raised in El Paso, Texas by Mexican immigrant parents. A former Bill Gates Millennium Scholar, she holds a Mfa in film production and directing from UCLA. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Steven Bochco Fellowship, the Hollywood Foreign Press Award, the Edie and Lew Wasserman Fellowship and the National Hispanic Foundation of the Arts Scholarship, among others. Her Mfa thesis film, Child Of The Desert, won Best Short Film and the Texas Award at the 2012 USA Film Festival. She was a 2013 Film Independent Project Involve Directing Fellow and was selected for the 2013 TransAtlantic Talent Lab in Reykjavik, Iceland. In 2014, she was selected for the Sundance sponsored Latino Screenwriting Project. She has worked as a story producer for Brave New Foundation on a documentary series that follows several families who are stuck in the crosshairs of the immigration epidemic and currently manages the artist services programs at the Austin Film Society.

Ani Mercedes — Miami, Fl

Ani Mercedes directed, produced, shot and edited her first short documentary (The Hall) in 2013, which aired on PBS. Her second short documentary (Hand Built Boat) was an official selection at the Miami International Film Festival and awarded an Awesome Foundation Grant. She coached the lead subject to use the film as a tool to raise funds to help sustain a boat building program for youth. Ani began her film career at the documentary powerhouse Kartemquin Films (Hoop Dreams, The Interrupters) as an intern, where she lead transcription on several projects by award-winning director Steve James. Prior to filmmaking, she was a Community Organizer on President Obama’s 2008 campaign, served as a White House intern, and organized over 1,000 rides to the polls in the 2012 campaign. She holds a B.A. from The University of Chicago and a Masters in Public Administration with a focus in Education Policy.

Tracy RectorSeattle, Wa

Tracy Rector is a Choctaw/Seminole filmmaker and activist, as well as Co-founder of Longhouse Media. In addition to arts advocacy, Rector has made 400 short films in collaboration with Indigenous people and communities, and is currently in production of her fifth feature documentary. As co-producer of the award-winning film Teachings of the Tree People, producer of March Point, and co-director of Clearwater; Rector has developed an awareness and sensitivity to the power of media and film as a modern storytelling tool. Her work has been featured on Independent Lens, Cannes Film Festival, ImagineNative, National Geographic’s All Roads Film Project, Toronto International Film Festival and in the Smithsonian’s Museum of the American Indian. Rector has begun to transfer her method of storytelling to large gallery exhibitions and art movements. She most recently curated You Are On Indigenous Land, in·dig·e·nize, Women on the Brink, Bloodlines and Re:definition featuring contemporary works by Indigenous artists on the significance of place, truth, transformation and identity.

Carmen Dixon — New York, NY

Carmen Dixon is an organizer and educator with a social justice politic rooted in faith. Carmen’s organizing was activated during childhood as she witnessed her parents fighting for worker justice. She currently organizes at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. (Ldf) to support families and communities that have been deeply impacted by police violence. Prior to joining Ldf, Carmen worked at the Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies (Fpwa) organizing clergy to advocate for economic equity policies. There she launched Fpwa’s first faith based initiative designed exclusively for women. After journeying to Ferguson, Mo in the aftermath of the police murder of Michael Brown Jr., Carmen attended a screening of Freedom Riders that inspired her to get involved with the Black Lives Matter New York City Chapter. Carmen’s own organizing is inspired by storytelling and she is excited to use film as a visual/auditory tool to fight oppression.

Firelight Media Launches Impact Producer Fellowship & Names Inaugural Honorees was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

‘The Americans’ Season 5 Premiere: EPs Preview What’s Ahead and Why We’ll Never See Putin

‘The Americans’ Season 5 Premiere: EPs Preview What’s Ahead and Why We’ll Never See Putin
It’s the best of times and the worst of times for FX’s “The Americans.” The critically acclaimed drama launched Season 5 (its penultimate run in a now six-season plan) Tuesday night and returns to the air riding high on finally breaking through at the Emmys.

And yet a funny thing happened between seasons. The election of Donald Trump ushered in a seemingly endless string of headlines about Russia and revived a certain “us vs. them” mindset most Americans put aside after the Cold War ended. What exactly does that mean for a show set at the ’80s height of the U.S./Soviet conflict?

As showrunners Joe Weisberg and Joel Fields tell Variety, nothing has changed when it comes to how they make the show. But it’s very possible that everything — or at least something — has changed in the way viewers will receive it. We’ll find out as the season plays out over the
See full article at Variety - TV News »

L.A. Law Reboot Delayed

L.A. Law Reboot Delayed
Those eagerly anticipating the return of L.A. Law will have to get their legal drama fix elsewhere — at least for the foreseeable future.

RelatedBlair Underwood Recalls L.A. Law Ep’s Prediction on His First Day on the Job

A reboot of the acclaimed 1980s procedural has been delayed, our sister site Deadline reports. The script, which was pitched to broadcast networks, will now be redeveloped to potentially appeal to a cable or streaming network.

Co-creator Steven Bochco revealed that an L.A. Law revival was in the works during an Aug. 1 interview on The Rich Eisen Show. At the time,
See full article at TVLine.com »

‘L.A. Law’ Reboot To Be Redeveloped

L.A. Law, the contemporary revival of the Emmy-winning 1980s NBC legal drama, will be redeveloped. The project, from L.A. Law co-creator Steven Bochco and one of the series' original writers, Billy Finkelstein, was developed in-house at 20th Century Fox TV and was recently taken out as a spec. While the initial script was tailored for broadcast, I hear the project now will be tweaked to also target cable and streaming networks. "They found a way to take an iconic series…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Bones: 6 Things You Didn’t Know about Tamara Taylor

Tamara Taylor has been around television dating back to 1991 when she had an uncredited role in A Different World. Currently she plays the role of Camille on Fox’s hit series Bones. Her career took off when she landed a series regular role on Fox’s Party of Five. Since then she has appeared in Steven Bochco’s City of Angels, Hidden Hills, Lost, Numb3rs, CSI: Miami, NCIS, as well as appearing in films. She also had a role in Serenity, the movie spin-off of the cult hit Firefly. She made her film debut in the Wayans brothers’ romantic comedy Senseless. Within

Bones: 6 Things You Didn’t Know about Tamara Taylor
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Blair Underwood Recalls L.A. Law Ep's Prediction on His First Day on the Job

Blair Underwood Recalls L.A. Law Ep's Prediction on His First Day on the Job
These days he may play a spy mastermind on Quantico, but when Blair Underwood first set foot on the L.A. Law soundstage in 1987, “I was a baby,” he tells TVLine.

The 21-year-old had filmed guest spots on series like Scarecrow & Mrs. King and The Cosby Show and was a cast member on the short-lived crime drama Downtown (opposite future Svu queen Mariska Hargitay). But when he arrived at the legal offices of McKenzie, Brackman, Chaney and Kuzak, “I was a baby,” Underwood recalls, laughing.

RelatedSaved By the Bell Star: Jessie’s Pill-Freakout Scene Hid a Sweet Secret

And as a highly impressionable showbiz newbie,
See full article at TVLine.com »

‘L.A. Law’ Reboot Comes Together For Next Season

A tepid January TV spec market might get a jolt soon with an iconic title making its return. 20th Century Fox TV is expected to take out the contemporary revival of the Emmy-winning 1980s NBC legal drama L.A. Law, which was developed in-house. Co-creator Steven Bochco revealed in August that he was developing a new L.A. Law with one of the series’ original writers, Billy Finkelstein. “They found a way to take an iconic series and bring it to 2016 Los Angeles,” infusing…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Random Roles: D.B. Woodside on Lucifer, Buffy The Vampire Slayer, and learning harsh lessons from 24

  • The AV Club
Welcome to Random Roles, wherein we talk to actors about the characters who defined their careers. The catch: They don’t know beforehand what roles we’ll ask them to talk about.

The actor: This year not only marks the 20th anniversary of D.B. Woodside’s first TV appearance (Steven Bochco’s Murder One) but also finds him with a starring role on a prime-time series. Over the course of the past two decades, Woodside has popped up in films as diverse as Romeo Must Die and Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2, but if his face looks familiar, it’s probably due to his regular or recurring roles on Buffy The Vampire Slayer, Hellcats, Parenthood, Suits, and 24, not to mention a number of one-off appearances on other series. Currently, Woodside can be seen playing the big brother of the titular character on Fox’s Lucifer, now in its ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Aaron Sorkin to Receive Wgaw Paddy Chayefsky Award

Aaron Sorkin to Receive Wgaw Paddy Chayefsky Award
Aaron Sorkin, the creator of “The West Wing” and “The Social Network,” will receive the Writers Guild of America, West’s 2017 Paddy Chayefsky Laurel Award for Television Writing Achievement in recognition of his career and work in writing for television.

“Starting with ‘Sports Night,’ through ‘The West Wing,’ ‘Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip,’ ‘The Newsroom’ and beyond, Aaron Sorkin has changed the language of television,” said Wgaw President Howard A. Rodman. “His knowing, incisive, witty, brave, deeply intelligent writing has raised the bar for the rest of us, defined the notion of behind-the-scenes, and has in the process reminded us, again and again, of the special responsibilities that accrue to our profession. For as long as people walk and talk – at the same time, of course – Sorkin’s dialogue will be remembered. But more crucially, we want to remember the ways he has always encouraged us, as humans and as citizens, to
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Ryan Murphy's American Equality Story: The Showrunner's TV Directors Are More Than 50 Percent Female Now

Ryan Murphy knows what it's like to feel like an outsider. In 1999, when the first season of his TV debut Popular aired on the WB, the lack of diversity behind the scenes stunned him. "I walked onto the set, and it was all straight white dudes in their 50s," recalls Murphy, now 51 himself — but back then a gay white dude in his 30s. "I remember feeling like a stranger in a strange land, and it was my own show."

There may have been an evolution since the days when all showrunners looked like Steven Bochco and David...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Director James Burrows on How Grant Tinker – and His Mtm Hit Factory – Changed Television

Director James Burrows on How Grant Tinker – and His Mtm Hit Factory – Changed Television
James Burrows, perhaps the most successful TV director in history, owes his lengthy small screen career to Grant Tinker.

Tinker, who died Monday at 90, was a towering television titan who turned Mtm Enterprises into one of the most successful production companies in the 1970s, then took over NBC and led that network from worst to first in the 1980s.

But his legacy lives on, thanks to the writers, producers, directors and stars he championed during his long career. Burrows, who recently directed his 1,000th episode of television (which NBC celebrated with a primetime special), is one of them.

“I owe my entire television career to him,” Burrows told IndieWire.

Burrows was a theater director and stage manager in New York when he worked on the musical “Holly Golightly” (later retitled “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”), starring Mary Tyler Moore and Richard Chamberlain. The show closed after just four nights, but by the end,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

Director James Burrows on How Grant Tinker – and His Mtm Hit Factory – Changed Television

  • Indiewire
Director James Burrows on How Grant Tinker – and His Mtm Hit Factory – Changed Television
James Burrows, perhaps the most successful TV director in history, owes his lengthy small screen career to Grant Tinker.

Tinker, who died Monday at 90, was a towering television titan who turned Mtm Enterprises into one of the most successful production companies in the 1970s, then took over NBC and led that network from worst to first in the 1980s.

But his legacy lives on, thanks to the writers, producers, directors and stars he championed during his long career. Burrows, who recently directed his 1,000th episode of television (which NBC celebrated with a primetime special), is one of them.

“I owe my entire television career to him,” Burrows told IndieWire.

Burrows was a theater director and stage manager in New York when he worked on the musical “Holly Golightly” (later retitled “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”), starring Mary Tyler Moore and Richard Chamberlain. The show closed after just four nights, but by the end,
See full article at Indiewire »

Grant Tinker, Revered Former NBC and Mtm Chief, Dies at 90

Grant Tinker, Revered Former NBC and Mtm Chief, Dies at 90
Former NBC chairman-ceo Grant Tinker, a revered producer and executive who founded Mtm Enterprises with Mary Tyler Moore and later rose to the challenge of taking NBC from last place to first, has died. He was 90.

Tinker died Monday at his home in California, according to a report Wednesday on NBC’s “Today.”

Grant Tinker was a great man who made an indelible mark on NBC and the history of television that continues to this day,” NBCUniversal CEO Steve Burke said. “He loved creative people and protected them, while still expertly managing the business. Very few people have been able to achieve such a balance. We try to live up to the standards he set each and every day. Our hearts go out to his family and friends.”

The poised, avuncular Tinker’s television career spanned almost half a century, from its inception through the 1990s. He usually took the high road on most of his projects
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Bob Iger’s Early Career at ABC Signaled His Future Success at Disney

Bob Iger made his mark as an executive in the 1980s while working for the legendary Roone Arledge at ABC Sports in New York. Iger was ambitious but not flashy — Arledge took up plenty of the spotlight in the department.

But not long after Iger was promoted to VP of programming for ABC Sports in 1987, he was called to Los Angeles to give a presentation at the network’s annual meeting with the managers of its 200 affiliate stations. Iger spoke with such ease and fluency about the division’s plans that he impressed fellow ABC execs watching from the back of the ballroom at the Century Plaza Hotel, a group that included Ted Harbert and then-abc Entertainment president Brandon Stoddard.

“He recited the entire schedule of ABC’s college football without a single note in hand,” recalls Harbert, who recently stepped down as chairman of NBC Broadcasting. “He had every game, every
See full article at Variety - TV News »

James L. Brooks Selected for Norman Lear Award by Producers Guild

James L. Brooks Selected for Norman Lear Award by Producers Guild
The Producers Guild of America has selected longtime television and film producer James L. Brooks as the recipient of the 2017 Norman Lear Achievement Award in Television.

The award will be presented to Brooks at the 28th Annual Producers Guild Awards ceremony on Jan. 28 at the Beverly Hilton hotel.

Brooks has won 22 Emmys and is a three-time Academy Award winner. He was the creative force behind “The Simpsons,” “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” and “Taxi.” His most current project is “The Edge of Seventeen,” starring Hailee Steinfeld with a release this month.

Producers Guild Awards Chairs Donald De Line and Amy Pascal said, “For decades, Jim Brooks has brought memorable characters, big laughs and above all, a profound sense of humanity into our homes. Jim is a producer whose work has influenced multiple generations of storytellers, so it’s an incredible privilege to be able to honor him with our Guild’s Norman Lear Achievement Award.”

Shonda Rhimes
See full article at Variety - TV News »

James L. Brooks Selected for Norman Lear Award by Producers Guild

James L. Brooks Selected for Norman Lear Award by Producers Guild
The Producers Guild of America has selected longtime television and film producer James L. Brooks as the recipient of the 2017 Norman Lear Achievement Award in Television.

The award will be presented to Brooks at the 28th Annual Producers Guild Awards ceremony on Jan. 28 at the Beverly Hilton hotel.

Brooks has won 22 Emmys and is a three-time Academy Award winner. He was the creative force behind “The Simpsons,” “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” and “Taxi.” His most current project is “The Edge of Seventeen,” starring Hailee Steinfeld with a release this month.

Producers Guild Awards Chairs Donald De Line and Amy Pascal said, “For decades, Jim Brooks has brought memorable characters, big laughs and above all, a profound sense of humanity into our homes. Jim is a producer whose work has influenced multiple generations of storytellers, so it’s an incredible privilege to be able to honor him with our Guild’s Norman Lear Achievement Award.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

On my radar: David Harewood’s cultural highlights

The actor on Steven Bochco’s biography, a new film, Moonlight, about being black and gay in America, and Ava DuVernay’s shocking documentary about Us prisons

Birmingham-born actor David Harewood is renowned for his versatile work in television, theatre and film. After graduating from Rada, he established himself in the public eye in the 1990s, securing roles in television series including Fat Friends, Robin Hood and Hustle. In 2012, he was awarded an MBE for his services to drama. Perhaps best known for his performance as tough-minded CIA boss David Estes in the Us political thriller Homeland, he has since gone on to play another spy in the BBC critically acclaimed drama The Night Manager. Next year he will join Alicia Vikander and Christoph Waltz on the big screen in Justin Chadwick’s forthcoming drama Tulip Fever. Harewood presents the documentary Will Britain Ever Have a Black Prime Minister? on BBC2 on 13 November.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Cecilia Hart, Wife of James Earl Jones, Has Died After Ovarian Cancer Battle: Report

  • PEOPLE.com
Cecilia Hart, Wife of James Earl Jones, Has Died After Ovarian Cancer Battle: Report
Cecilia Hart, the wife of James Earl Jones, died Sunday, Oct. 16, after a battle with ovarian cancer, WestportNow reports. She was 68.

Hart and Jones, 85, met on the set of the 1979-80 Steven Bochco series Paris.

They married in 1982, after playing opposite one another in a revival of William Shakespeare’s Othello that same year. They have one son together â€. Flynn Earl Jones.

Her Broadway credits include the revivals of The Heiress (1976) and Design for Living (1984) â€. and the premiere production Tom Stoppard’s 1977 play Dirty Linen & New-Found-Land, for which she was nominated for a Drama Desk Award.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »
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