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Louie Anderson Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Trivia (15) | Personal Quotes (3) | Salary (1)

Overview (3)

Date of Birth 24 March 1953Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
Birth NameLouie Perry Anderson
Height 5' 10" (1.78 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Iconic comedian Louie Anderson, the two-time Emmy award winner, is one of the country's most recognized and adored comics; named by Comedy Central as "One of 100 Greatest Stand-Up Comedians of All Time." His career has spanned more than 30 years. He is a best selling author, star of his own stand up specials and sitcoms, and he continues to tour the country performing to standing room only crowds worldwide.

In 2016, Louie was cast to co-star along with Zach Galifianakis and Martha Kelly in the hit FX series, "Baskets." Anderson's extraordinary new role is Christine Baskets, the matriarch of the Baskets clan. The character is based on both his mother and his five sisters, who were a major presence in his life.

"I'm not as nice in the character as my mom was as a person. It really is an extension of my mom, Anderson says, adding that he always aims to make his performance "as real as possible" without "affecting or cartooning it up. It felt like it was divine intervention when I got the call to be on the show, that somehow my mom, from the great beyond, was finally getting herself into show business where she truly belonged in the first place."

Sharing the ups and downs of his childhood experiences as one of eleven children in Minnesota, Louie crafted comedy routines that rang true for his early club audiences while reducing them to helpless fits of laughter, routines that led him from his career as a counselor to troubled children to the first-place trophy at the 1981 Midwest Comedy Competition. Henny Youngman, who hosted the competition, recognized the diamond-in-the-rough genius of the young comic and hired him as a writer, providing invaluable experience that soon put Louie in his own spotlight on comedy stages all over the country.

Johnny Carson, the comedy icon for generations of rising stars, invited Louie to make his national television debut on the "The Tonight Show" in 1984, and the rest is history. Leno, Letterman, The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, "Comic Relief" and Showtime, HBO and CMT specials followed, including hosting the legendary game show, Family Feud, making Louie a household name and opening doors for him as an actor. He has guest-starred in sitcoms like "Grace Under Fire" and dramas like "Touched by an Angel" and "Chicago Hope," and he has had memorable featured roles in film comedies like "Coming to America," opposite of Eddie Murphy, and the classic "Ferris Bueller's Day Off." In 2013, he took a dive on the ABC reality series, "Splash" where he conquered his own fears while becoming an inspiration of hope. His stand up Special, "Big Baby Boomer" premiered on CMT, in 2013. Also in that year, he competed and inspired on the ABC reality competition show, Splash. In 1995 Louie put his creative energies to work on the Saturday morning animated series "Life with Louie." The long-running series based on Louie's own childhood and his life with his father won three Humanitas Prizes for writing on a children's' animated series, making him the only three-time recipient of this award. It also earned a Genesis Award for its depiction of the proper treatment of animals and, most significantly, two Emmy Awards. His best selling books include Dear Dad - Letters From An Adult Child, a collection of alternately touching and outrageous letters from Louie to his late father, and Good-bye Jumbo...Hello Cruel World, self-help for those who struggle with self-esteem issues, and his latest installment on family, The F Word, How To Survive Your Family. When not in production, Louie continues to tour, traveling the States doing what Louie loves to do, Stand Up Comedy. Louie again delivers to his fans his inimitable brand of humor and warmth.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Ahmos Hassan

Trivia (15)

Is the tenth child out of eleven children.
Formerly worked as a counselor at a home for abused children.
In 1981, met comedy legend Henny Youngman, and began writing one-liners for him.
Lived in Las Vegas during most of his career, but now lives in Los Angeles
30 September 2003 - Recovering in an LA hospital for treatment of an undisclosed heart problem.
Shortly after the attacks on New York City of 9-11-01, Louie came up with the idea that they do a special NYC police vs. firemen week for the show, the prize money going to the NYPD and FDNY Widow's Fund. Louie put his own personal money to start a pot at the beginning of the week -- $75,000.
When ABC's Who Wants to Be a Millionaire (1999) hit the air, Louie thought it would be a good idea to raise the Family Feud (1999) jackpot from $10,000 to $20,000. He got his way, and Family Feud's ratings went up as a result. The jackpot had been $10,000 for many years.
Enjoys butter.
Had said that he did not even like his sitcom, The Louie Show (1996) due to all the changes CBS made to it.
Biography/bibliography in: "Contemporary Authors". New Revision Series, vol. 137, pages 2-3. Farmington Hills, MI: Thomson Gale, 2005.
Shot the pilot episode of the popular 80s/90s sitcom, Perfect Strangers (1986). Louie played the role of "Larry", alongside Bronson Pinchot, who played "Balki". Believing Bronson and Louie did not have the right chemistry, Louie's part was recast for the series, and played by Mark Linn-Baker.
In 2000, Anderson was blackmailed by a man threatening to reveal to tabloids that Anderson allegedly approached him in a California casino requesting sexual acts in 1993. Fearing the story would threaten his starring roles in two family-oriented series, Louie initially paid a large amount of extortion money, but when the blackmailer's demands increased, Louie went to the police. The man was arrested and sentenced to 21 months in prison.
The Real Ghostbusters (1986) character, "Dr. Ray Stantz", was based on his voice and appearance, Dan Aykroyd's appeal to the occult and technical know-how and John Belushi's comedic delivery.
In a 2002 episode of E! True Hollywood Story (1996), he stated that, after being chosen to host the 1999 revival of Family Feud (1999), he wanted the blessing of original host Richard Dawson. For that reason, the studio invited Dawson to make a guest appearance on the premiere episode and "pass the torch" to Anderson, but Dawson declined the invitation.
The Palace Station Hotel and Casino opened the Louie Anderson Theater where Louie performs 5 nights per week. [August 2010]

Personal Quotes (3)

[on his immense weight] My first words were "Seconds, please". Most kids in kindergarten napped on a little rug. I had a braided 9 x 12.
[in 2002, commenting on the revised Family Feud (2002) with Richard Karn succeeding him as the host] My prediction is that the show's off the air within a year.
I hope I'm not on E! True Hollywood Story (1996) 'til I'm dead.

Salary (1)

Family Feud (1999) $1,500,000

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