Edit
Buzz Aldrin Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (3) | Trivia (14) | Personal Quotes (8)

Overview (3)

Date of Birth 20 January 1930Montclair, New Jersey, USA
Birth NameEdwin Eugene Aldrin Jr.
Height 5' 10" (1.78 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Buzz Aldrin was born on January 20, 1930 in Montclair, New Jersey, USA as Edwin Eugene Aldrin Jr. He is known for his work on The Other Side of the Moon (1990), Fly Me to the Moon 3D (2008) and Apollo 11: The Untold Story (2006). He was previously married to Lois Driggs Cannon, Beverly Van Zile and Jean Ann Archer.

Spouse (3)

Lois Driggs Cannon (14 February 1988 - 28 December 2012) (divorced)
Beverly Van Zile (19 December 1975 - 10 April 1978) (divorced)
Jean Ann Archer (29 December 1954 - 1972) (divorced) (3 children)

Trivia (14)

Astronaut, second man on the moon.
Aldrin's mother's maiden name was Moon.
Had his first name legally changed to "Buzz" in 1979.
Moonwalker. Lunar Module Pilot, Apollo 11, making him the second man to walk on the Moon.
Society of Operating Cameramen, (SOC) Recipient, Technical Achievment Award (1995) "NASA, First live television broadcast from the Moon" (1969).
His Swedish ancestors were blacksmiths who emigrated to America from the province Värmland in Sweden.
Inducted into the New Jersey Hall of Fame in 2007 for his services to enterprise and space (inaugural election). Official induction ceremonies held in May 2008.
In 2007, at age 77, he underwent plastic surgery for a face-lift. Claims that being subjected to countless bouts of G-force as a fighter pilot and astronaut caused his jowls to sag prematurely.
Flew twice for NASA. Once on the first manned lunar expedition Apollo 11 with Neil Armstrong and Michael Collins and once on Gemini 12 with Jim Lovell, the last Gemini mission. On the historic Apollo 11 mission, the lunar module was Eagle and the command module was Columbia.
Honorary member of the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC).
Jokingly credited in Monty Python's Flying Circus: The Buzz Aldrin Show (1970) as actor, writer and makeup artist.
Received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 7021 Hollywood Boulevard and Vine Street in Hollywood, California on January 14, 1993.
His nickname "Buzz" originated in childhood. The younger of his two older sisters mispronounced 'brother' as 'buzzer', which was then shortened to 'Buzz'.
Wrote a 2009 memoir "Magnificent Desolation," telling in detail his problems after his return from the moon with divorce, drinking, depression, and despair and checking into rehab in 1975 where he started the long climb back to sobriety and hope.

Personal Quotes (8)

[on joining Neil Armstrong in first walk on the moon, 20 July 1969] Beautiful! Beautiful! Magnificent desolation!
[on why no famous photos were taken of Neil Armstrong during the Apollo 11 landing on the moon] As the sequence of lunar operations evolved, Neil had the camera most of the time, and the majority of pictures taken on the moon that include an astronaut are of me. It wasn't until we were back on Earth and in the lunar receiving laboratory looking over the pictures that we realized there were few pictures of Neil. My fault, perhaps, but we had never simulated this in our training.
There's a need for accepting responsibility - for a person's life and making choices that are not just ones for immediate short-term comfort. You need to make an investment, and the investment is in health and education.
We can continue to try and clean up the gutters all over the world and spend all of our resources looking at just the dirty spots and trying to make them clean. Or we can lift our eyes up and look into the skies and move forward in an evolutionary way.
I think humans will reach Mars, and I would like to see it happen in my lifetime.
Mars is there, waiting to be reached.
The torment of depression and the complications of addiction that accompany it affect millions, including myself and family members before me - my grandfather committed suicide before I was born and my mother the year before I went to the moon - along with hundreds of veterans who come to a similar fate each year," Aldrin wrote. "As individuals and as a nation we need to be compassionate and supportive of all who suffer and give them the resources to face life.
[on Robin Williams] I regarded Robin Williams as a friend and fellow sufferer. His passing is a great loss. The torment of depression and the complications of addiction that accompany it affect millions, including myself and family members before me - my grandfather committed suicide before I was born and my mother the year before I went to the moon - along with hundreds of veterans who come to a similar fate each year. As individuals and as a nation we need to be compassionate and supportive of all who suffer and give them the resources to face life. Robin Williams RIP.

See also

Other Works | Publicity Listings | Official Sites | Contact Info

Contribute to This Page