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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2003

10 items from 2014


From 'Psycho' to 'Gone Girl': the best director/composer teams

5 October 2014 7:54 AM, PDT | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

With this weekend's release of Gone Girl, director David Fincher has once again showcased the unsettling sounds of award-winning composers Atticus Ross and Trent Reznor (above). Ever since 2010's The Social Network, the duo have become a fixture of Fincher's work. The duo's deceptively minimal sound, with subtle motifs barely hiding cold electronic undercurrents, is remarkably well-suited for Fincher's trademark visual aesthetic, in which every smile and doorway can take on an air of menace if the camera lingers long enough. While he has worked with a number of composers before—most notably Howard ShoreFincher has found »

- Joshua Rivera

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Criterion Collection: Sundays and Cybèle | Blu-ray Review

30 September 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Winner of the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film in 1963, Serge Bourguignon’s Sundays and Cybèle has finally been issued in an official North American digital video edition by Criterion. For decades Sundays and Cybèle was only available to Ntsc markets through imported discs of dodgy provenance and a few murky, widely scattered VHS copies. While half a century is certainly a significant delay, the high quality of the film and this superb pressing will make most cinephiles agree it was worth the wait.

Sundays and Cybèle is the story of Pierre (Hardy Krüger), a 30-ish former fighter pilot who now aimlessly wanders the quiet streets of Ville-d’Avray on the outskirts of Paris. Pierre suffers from a severe case of what would now be called Ptsd, squarely blaming himself for a tragic accident that occurred during the heat of battle in Vietnam. Reeling from amnesia and nightmarish visions, Pierre »

- David Anderson

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Director Matt Reeves on how Coppola's 'Godfather' advice shaped his new 'Apes'

10 July 2014 5:10 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

I sat down with Matt Reeves in the shadow of the Golden Gate Bridge to see which one of us could have our hair more disheveled by the amazing wind on Crissy Field. Enjoy the video. The last time I saw Reeves, it was at Michael Giacchino's house, where I got to watch the two of them working on a scoring session for "Let Me In." I don't bring that up simply to not-so-humblebrag, but to illustrate just how unusually open Reeves can be about the filmmaking process. Even after almost 16 years of writing about films online, I can count the number of scoring sessions I've been invited to attend on my fingers. It's one of the more private parts of the overall filmmaking experience, and it's also a pressure cooker, so many filmmakers simply can't open that up to reporters. When "Let Me In" came to Comic-Con, I moderated the panel, »

- Drew McWeeny

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Review: 'Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes" is a daring and dazzling accomplishment

28 June 2014 9:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

One of the words that was used most frequently when describing "Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes" was "surprise," and with good reason. After all, the previous attempt to bring the long-running science-fiction franchise back to life was a nightmare, a truly terrible film that is a narrative disaster even among the narrative disasters that mark many of Tim Burton's lesser films. It seemed like Fox had limped along trying to get an "Apes" movie made for so long that they were willing to try anything. Scott Frank came close to getting a film make called "Caesar," and it sounded like he was on the right track. His basic idea started with a Fox-mandated remake of "Conquest Of The Planet Of The Apes," but went in a very different direction. His film was designed to be a hard-science story about what might happen if we made the advance »

- Drew McWeeny

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Blu-ray, DVD Release: Sundays and Cybèle

25 June 2014 11:17 AM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: Sept. 30, 2014

Price: DVD $29.95, Blu-ray $39.95

Studio: Criterion

Hardy Kruger and Nicole Courcel in Sundays and Cybele.

In French director Serge Bourgignon’s provocative 1962 drama Sundays and Cybèle, a psychologically damaged war veteran (Hardy Kruger) and a neglected child (Nicole Courcel) begin a startlingly intimate friendship—one that ultimately ignites the suspicion and anger of his friends and neighbors in suburban Paris.

Bourguignon’s film makes thoughtful, humane drama out of potentially incendiary subject matter, and with the help of the sensitive cinematography of Henri Decaë (The 400 Blows) and a delicate score by Maurice Jarre (Lawrence of Arabia), Sundays and Cybèle becomes a stirring contemplation of an alliance between two troubled souls.

Presented in French with English subtitles, Criterion’s Blu-ray and DVD editions of the film include the following:

• New 2K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray

• New interviews with director Serge Bourguignon »

- Laurence

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Blu-ray Release: The Train

23 May 2014 2:25 PM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

Blu-ray Release Date: June 10, 2014

Price: Blu-ray $29.95

Studio: Twilight Time

Burt Lancaster in The Train

John Frankenheimer’s (The Manchurian Candidate, Seconds) crackling 1964 action war thriller The Train finally makes its Blu-ray debut on its 50th anniversary courtesy of Twilight Time.

The Train stars Burt Lancaster (Sweet Smell of Success) as a workaday World War II-era French trainman charged with ensuring that a cargo of irreplaceable French art—the pride and heritage of his nation—is not allowed to leave France, despite the machinations of a Nazi officer (Paul Scofield, A Man for All Seasons) determined to steal these great works for Germany.

Sounds a bit Monuments Men-ish, doesn’t it?

Also starring Jeanne Moreau (La Notte) and Michel Simon (L’Atalante), and featuring compelling black-and-white cinematography by Jean Tournier and Walter Wottitz and a thrilling score by Maurice Jarre (Lawrence of Arabia), The Train remains one of the icons of Sixties cinema. »

- Laurence

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Cannes Film Review: ‘The Blue Room’

16 May 2014 5:47 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Not a chamber piece in the most literal sense, but with all the poky airlessness that its title implies, “The Blue Room” represents a disappointing return to Cannes for actor-turned-auteur Mathieu Amalric. Adapting Georges Simenon’s slender mystery novella with fidelity to its bleak narrative but indifference to its disquieting erotic and psychological subtext, Amalric’s fourth feature as a director is less a whodunnit than a whodunwhat, with the star on wounded, taciturn form as a businessman under investigation for an initially unspecified crime. But while this appropriately brief film unravels its enigma at a tidy clip, it gathers neither enough heat, nor quite enough of a chill, to linger in the bones. Amalric’s name and a sexy premise may secure some distributor interest outside France, but the view from this “Room” is nonetheless limited.

Amalric’s last feature as director, the sweet-and-spiky burlesque-ensemble study “On Tour,” was »

- Guy Lodge

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Trailers from Hell Looks at Peter Weir's 'The Year of Living Dangerously'

28 March 2014 8:45 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Warner Archive Week! concludes at Trailers from Hell, with director Karyn Kusama introducing "The Year of Living Dangerously."Peter Weir’s superb political thriller set against the upheaval of Sukarno’s Indonesia is suspenseful, smart and beautifully acted with top honors going to Linda Hunt’s gender-bending triumph as photo-journalist Billy Kwan who strikes the romantic sparks between the more conventional duo played by Mel Gibson and Sigourney Weaver. The title was Sukarno’s prophetic phrase for the year 1965. Filming in Manila was disrupted by death threats from Moslem radicals and most of the film was shot in Australia. Composer Maurice Jarre eschewed his typically epic orchestrations for a low key electronic score bolstered by ancient tribal instruments. »

- Trailers From Hell

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The Year of Living Dangerously

27 March 2014 10:00 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Peter Weir’s superb political thriller set against the upheaval of Sukarno’s Indonesia is suspenseful, smart and beautifully acted with top honors going to Linda Hunt’s gender-bending triumph as photo-journalist Billy Kwan who strikes the romantic sparks between the more conventional duo played by Mel Gibson and Sigourney Weaver. The title was Sukarno’s prophetic phrase for the year 1965. Filming in Manila was disrupted by death threats from Moslem radicals and most of the film was shot in Australia. Composer Maurice Jarre eschewed his typically epic orchestrations for a low key electronic score bolstered by ancient tribal instruments.

The post The Year of Living Dangerously appeared first on Trailers From Hell.

»

- TFH Team

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Review: "Shout At The Devil" (1976) Starring Lee Marvin And Roger Moore DVD/Blu-ray From Timeless Media

14 March 2014 3:03 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Lee Pfeiffer

Timeless Media have released the epic 1976 adventure film Shout at the Devil as a Blu-ray/DVD combo pack. The movie, produced by Michael Klinger and directed by Peter Hunt, is an big budget affair very much in the style of John Huston's The Man Who Would Be King, which was released the previous year. Both films follow the antics of a couple of charismatic rogues in exotic settings. The film is based on the novel by author Wilbur Smith, who also co-wrote the screenplay. The movie was shot in between Roger Moore's second and third James Bond films, The Man With the Golden Gun and The Spy Who Loved Me and boasts a "who's who" of Eon Productions talent. Peter Hunt had edited the early Bond films and directed On Her Majesty's Secret Service. Ironically, Moore and Hunt never worked on a 007 film together but in »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2003

10 items from 2014


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