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The New Adventures Of Aladdin On VOD May 16th

The New Adventures Of Aladdin opens on VOD Nationwide on Tuesday, May 16 on all major platforms including iTunes, Google Play, Amazon, Microsoft, Vudu, Comcast, Charter, Cox, Verizon, Vimeo, and various other cable operators. The film will be released in both English-dubbed and French language versions (With English Subtitles).

On Christmas Eve, Sam and his best friend Khalid both dress up as Santa Claus to steal everything they can at their local department store. Quickly, Sam is stopped by a group of children asking for a story… the story of Aladdin. Or his own version of it. In Aladdin’s shoes, Sam embarks on a journey that will take him to the heart of the city of Baghdad, a place of infinite wonders.

Unfortunately, behind the picture-perfect setting, people are suffering from the tyranny of the terrible Vizir, known for his ferocity and questionable breath. Helped by his Genie, will the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Poster and trailer for comedy The New Adventures of Aladdin

With just three weeks to go until its VOD release, a new poster and trailer have arrived online for the upcoming comedy The New Adventures of Aladdin. Directed by Arthur Benzaquen, the film stars Kev Adams, Jean-Paul Rouve,Vanessa Guide,William Lebghil, Audrey Lamy, Eric Judor, and Michel Blanc; check them out below…

On Christmas’ eve, Sam and his best friend Khalid both dress up as Santa Claus to steal everything they can at their local department store. Quickly, Sam is stopped by a group of children asking for a story… the story of Aladdin. Or his own version of it. In Aladdin’s shoes, Sam embarks on a journey that will take him to the heart of the city of Baghdad, a place of infinite wonders.

Unfortunately, behind the picture-perfect setting, people are suffering from the tyranny of the terrible Vizir, known for his ferocity and questionable breath. Helped by his Genie,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Gaumont Bows U.S. Film Division, Poaches Working Title’s Johanna Byer (Exclusive)

Gaumont, the vertically integrated French studio that is the world’s oldest film company, is launching a U.S.-based feature film division and has lured away Johanna Byer from Working Title to run it.

Byer will be VP of creative affairs for the new division. She will be in charge of sourcing Gaumont’s library of more than 1,100 titles to develop and produce internationally driven English-language films.

The new division already boasts a development slate made up of U.S. remakes of South Korea’s “Train to Busan,” French films “Point Blank” and “Dead Tired,” and a new version of “Barbarella.”

Gaumont scooped up English-language remake rights in December to Yeon Sang-ho’s thriller “Train to Busan,” which premiered at Cannes in the Midnight section and earned strong reviews. “Point Blank” and “Dead Tired” are based on movies previously co-produced by Gaumont: Fred Cavaye’s 2010 thriller “A bout
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Gaumont Taps Cecile Gaget To Head International Production (Exclusive)

Leveraging its ties with high-profile talent and producers in the U.S. and in Europe, French mini-major Gaumont has tapped its head of sales Cecile Gaget to spearhead international production for the company.

Gaget, who’s been shepherding worldwide sales at the company since 2010, will be in charge of producing or co-producing English- and local-language movies. She will report to CEO Sidonie Dumas and vice-ceo Christophe Riandée.

International projects on Gaumont’s slate include Armando Iannucci’s “Death of Stalin” and “Ballerina,” which are produced by Quad Films (“Intouchables”) and North American shingle Main Journey; and Nicolas Winding Refn’s follow-up to “Neon Demon,” a revenge thriller set in Japan.

Gaumont is also co-developing “Montespan” (working title) with Alexandre Aja and Lgm. Gaumont has “Neon Demon” competing at Cannes.

“This new step totally made sense as Gaumont expands its footprint within and outside of France with production of both French-
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Cage aux Folles' Actor and French Academy Award Winner Featured in More Than 200 Films Dead at 93

Michel Galabru (right) and Louis de Funès in 'Le gendarme et les gendarmettes.' 'La Cage aux Folles' actor Michel Galabru dead at 93 Michel Galabru, best known internationally for his role as a rabidly reactionary politician in the comedy hit La Cage aux Folles, died in his sleep today, Jan. 4, '16, in Paris. The Moroccan-born Galabru (Oct. 27, 1922, in Safi) was 93. Throughout his nearly seven-decade career, Galabru was seen in more than 200 films – or, in his own words, “182 days,” as he was frequently cast in minor roles that required only a couple of days of work. He also appeared on stage, training at the Comédie Française and studying under film and stage veteran Louis Jouvet (Bizarre Bizarre, Quai des Orfèvres), and was featured in more than 70 television productions. Michel Galabru movies Michel Galabru's film debut took place in Maurice de Canonge's La bataille du feu (“The Battle of Fire,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Gaumont launches 'Odd Job', 'Pattaya' at Cannes

Gaumont launches 'Odd Job', 'Pattaya' at Cannes
Exclusive: Other new titles on slate include Pattaya and Critics’ Week screener Learn by Heart.

Gaumont has launched sales on Pascal Chaumeil’s upcoming Odd Job (Un Petit Boulot), achieving a first early deal to Pathé Switzerland on the eve of the Cannes market.

The production unites Chaumeil with Romain Duris, co-star of his 2010 hit Heartbreaker, as a down-on-his-luck unemployed factory worker who takes on a job as a hitman.

The film is based on Iain Levison’s novel Since the Lay-Offs adapted to the big screen by actor Michel Blanc who also appears in the film.

Described as a black comedy, combining the absurdity of the Coen Brothers and the tenderness of Ken Loach’s social comedies, the film is currently shooting in Mallorca.

Other new titles include Franck Gastambide’s comedy Pattaya in which he stars alongside Malik Bentalhal as two friends who set off on a madcap trip to a notorious Thai beach resort
See full article at ScreenDaily »

The Hundred Foot Journey | Review

Like Curry For Chocolat: Hallstrom Sticks to the Fruits of the Bestseller List

If you’re going to compare director Lasse Hallstrom’s latest film, The Hundred-Foot Journey to his extensive filmography over the past decade, then it stands out like a bright shiny penny. Another of Hallstrom’s adaptations of recently beloved bestselling novels, this tries to recreate the magical culinary delights that drove his 2000 hit Chocolat to such great heights. Here he has stapled another grand actress into the cast with Helen Mirren (moonlighting with her best French accent—the magical chocolate film had Juliette Binoche) and has producers like Oprah Winfrey and Steven Spielberg behind it. It’s an entirely prim and proper endeavor and appears clearly calibrated for a particular audience that favors a certain conservative strain to storytelling, where life’s uglier conceits like carnal knowledge and racist tendencies of the pastoral French are
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Film Review: ‘The Hundred-Foot Journey’

Film Review: ‘The Hundred-Foot Journey’
Beef bourguignon or tandoori goat? Career success or family loyalty? You can actually have it all, according to “The Hundred-Foot Journey,” a culture-clash dramedy that presents itself as the most soothing brand of cinematic comfort food. As such, this genteel, overlong adaptation of Richard C. Morais’ 2010 novel about two rival restaurants operating in a sleepy French village is not without its pleasures — a high-energy score by A.R. Rahman, exquisite gastro-porn shot by Linus Sandgren, the winningly barbed chemistry of Helen Mirren and Om Puri — all prepared to exacting middlebrow specifications and ensured to go down as tastily and tastefully as possible. With the formidable backing of producers Steven Spielberg and Oprah Winfrey, the DreamWorks concoction should cater to a broad array of arthouse appetites, particularly among those viewers who embraced the similar East-meets-West fusion cuisine of “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel.”

If this Old World foodie fairy tale feels like
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'The Hundred Foot Journey' Featurette with Steven Spielberg and Oprah Winfrey

'The Hundred Foot Journey' Featurette with Steven Spielberg and Oprah Winfrey
In DreamWorks Pictures' The Hundred-Foot Journey, the opening of a new Indian restaurant in the south of France next to a famous Michelin-starred eatery is nearly cause for a heated battle between the two establishments, until Le Saule Pleureur's icy proprietress, Madame Mallory, recognizes her rival's undeniable brilliance for preparing masterful meals. The studio has released a new featurette where producers Steven Spielberg and Oprah Winfrey explain the rivalry between these restaurants, showcasing how two distinct cultures found a way to come together. We also hear from star Helen Mirren, who plays French chef Madame Mallory, and director Lasse Hallstr&#246m, along with brand new footage from this upcoming drama, arriving in theaters August 8.

In The Hundred-Foot Journey, Hassan Kadam (Manish Dayal) is a culinary ing&#233nue with the gastronomic equivalent of perfect pitch. Displaced from their native India, the Kadam family, led by Papa (Om Puri), settles in the
See full article at MovieWeb »

Monsieur Hire Screens at The Classic French Film Festival This Saturday

The Classic French Film Festival celebrates St. Louis’ Gallic heritage and France’s cinematic legacy. The featured films span the decades from the 1920s through the 1980s (with a particular focus on filmmakers from the New Wave), offering a comprehensive overview of French cinema. Monsieur Hire will screen as part of the festival at 12pm Saturday, June 21st at the St. Louis Art Museum.

In a provincial French apartment block, Monsieur Hire (Michel Blanc) endures a solitary life of dull work as a tailor and vitriolic scorn from his neighbors. Hire’s only solace is an occasional night out bowling and his voyeuristic admiration of a neighbor, the ravishing Alice (Sandrine Bonnaire of “Vagabond”), a beautiful, free-spirited woman conducting a heated love affair through un-drawn curtains across the way. But when police discover the nude body of another young woman in a nearby vacant lot, Hire becomes the prime suspect
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

'The Hundred-Foot Journey' Trailer Starring Hellen Mirren

'The Hundred-Foot Journey' Trailer Starring Hellen Mirren
In The Hundred-Foot Journey, Hassan Kadam (Manish Dayal) is a culinary ing&#233nue with the gastronomic equivalent of perfect pitch. Displaced from their native India, the Kadam family, led by Papa (Om Puri), settles in the quaint village of Saint-Antonin-Noble-Val in the south of France. Filled with charm, it is both picturesque and elegant, the ideal place to settle down and open an Indian restaurant, the Maison Mumbai. That is, until the chilly chef proprietress of Le Saule Pleureur, a Michelin starred, classical French restaurant run by Madame Mallory (Academy Award&#174-winner Helen Mirren), gets wind of it. Her icy protests against the new Indian restaurant a hundred feet from her own, escalate to all out war between the two establishments, until Hassan's passion for French haute cuisine and for Mme. Mallory's enchanting sous chef, Marguerite (Charlotte Le Bon), combine with his mysteriously delicious talent to weave magic between their
See full article at MovieWeb »

What Were Hoskins' Best Films and Performances?

Bob Hoskins dead at 71: Hoskins’ best movies included ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit,’ ‘Mona Lisa’ (photo: Bob Hoskins in ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit’ with Jessica Rabbit, voiced by Kathleen Turner) Bob Hoskins, who died at age 71 in London yesterday, April 29, 2014, from pneumonia (initially reported as “complications of Parkinson’s disease”), was featured in nearly 70 movies over the course of his four-decade film career. Hoskins was never a major box office draw — "I don’t think I’m the sort of material movie stars are made of — I’m five-foot-six-inches and cubic. My own mum wouldn’t call me pretty." Yet, this performer with attributes similar to those of Edward G. Robinson, James Cagney, and Lon Chaney had the lead in one of the biggest hits of the late ’80s. In 1988, Robert Zemeckis’ groundbreaking Who Framed Roger Rabbit, which seamlessly blended animated and live action footage, starred Hoskins as gumshoe Eddie Valiant,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Refn, Coppola on Cannes jury

  • ScreenDaily
Refn, Coppola on Cannes jury
Willem Dafoe and Gael Garcia Bernal also among those called up for jury service at the 67th Cannes Film Festival.

The Cannes Film Festival has named the jury for its 67th edition, comprising eight world cinema names from China, Korea, Denmark, Iran, the Us, France and Mexico.

Jane Campion, the New Zealand filmmaker who won the Palme d’or for The Piano, was previously announced as the president of the jury, which will include five women and four men.

Cannes 2014: films

Those selected include Nicolas Winding Refn, the Danish director, screenwriter and producer who won Best Direction at Cannes in 2011 with Drive. His most recent film, Only God Forgives, played in Competition at Cannes last year.

Also chosen is Sofia Coppola, the Us director and screenwriter whose debut The Virgin Suicides was selected for the Directors’ Fortnight at Cannes in 1999. Coppola, who won a screenwriting Oscar for Lost in Translation, made it into
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Film Review: ‘Demi-soeur’

Film Review: ‘Demi-soeur’
One might think, given the experience and talent of those involved, that someone would have noticed that “Demi-soeur” was a recipe for disaster: A comedy about a mentally disabled person, while not necessarily a bad idea, is extremely tricky territory. Unfortunately, French actress-writer-director Josiane Balasko plunges in with all the finesse of a hopped-up Pollyanna, her simplistic interpretation of an impaired sexagenarian coming close to outright parody; vet comic thesp Michel Blanc’s Ecstasy-fueled transformation from raging misanthrope to beaming softie equally fails to convince. The outlook is dismal for this Rialto release, voted one of 2013’s worst films by Premiere.

Her mother having died recently, Nenette (Balasko, in a short gray bob and shapeless dress) has nowhere to go but a nursing home. Once ensconced there, however, she learns she cannot keep her best friend and pet tortoise, Totoche,” with her. She packs up and leaves, unnoticed. Setting out
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Demi-soeur Charts the Adventures of a Developmentally Disabled Senior Citizen

Demi-soeur Charts the Adventures of a Developmentally Disabled Senior Citizen
A misbegotten dramedy about the hijinks of the mentally handicapped, Demi-sœur charts the adventures of developmentally disabled senior citizen Nénette (Josiane Balasko, who also directs) after the death of her mother compels her to track down her father — a search that instead leads to a reunion with heretofore unknown pharmacist brother Paul (Michel Blanc).

Nénette chats incessantly with her pet tortoise and befriends a heavy metal singer who gives her a bag of ecstasy he calls "sweeteners," which Nénette then puts in uptight Paul's coffee, turning him into a drugged-out loon who, the film posits in an especially sour joke, is now on her intellectual and emotional plane.

Out of his mind, Paul bonds with Nénette (by setti...
See full article at Village Voice »

Tjff 2012: ‘The Day I Saw Your Heart’ magically conciliates its flaws with French charm

The Day I Saw Your Heart

Written and directed by Jennifer Devoldère

France, 2011

In Richard Linklater’s Before Sunrise, Julie Delpy prophetically describes what it means to be French. Delpy’s Celine, while philosophizing with Ethan Hawke’s Jesse, says,

“Each time I wear black, or like, lose my temper, or say anything about anything, you know, they always go, “Oh it’s so French. It’s so cute”. Ugh! I hate that!”

The conceit of her outrage is that no matter what they do, or how they do it, French people have always been able to keep calm and carry on by virtue of being French. This axiom is vividly legitimized in Jennifer Devoldère’s dramatic comedy, The Day I Saw Your Heart, which, although wildly imperfect, magically conciliates its flaws with French charm.

The story follows the 27-year old eccentric, Justine (Mélanie Laurent), and her dysfunctional family, whose
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Intouchables, A Trip To The Moon: Colcoa 2012

Omar Sy, François Cluzet, The Intouchables Among the three dozen or so films screening at the City of Lights / City of Angels (Colcoa) French film festival currently being held in Los Angeles, you'll find a couple of restored classics, several César nominees, and one of the biggest box-office hits in French history. Georges Méliès' 1902 short Le voyage dans la lune / A Trip to the Moon, inspired by Jules Verne's novel, is one of the restored classics to be screened at Colcoa. Méliès' short will be accompanied by Serge Bromberg and Eric Lange's Le Voyage extraordinaire / The Extraordinary Voyage, about the making and the restoration of A Trip to the Moon. The festival's other classic presentation is Marcel Carné's 1938 drama Hôtel du Nord, with Arletty, Louis Jouvet, Jean-Pierre Aumont, Tyrone Power's future wife Annabella, the recently deceased Paulette Dubost, and Bernard Blier. Those ignorant about the
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Nd/Nf 2012. Leon, Damian, Polak, Schöller

  • MUBI
Rounding up a bit of what the critics have been saying about the work screening at the New Directions/New Films festival tomorrow, we begin with Adam Leon's Gimme the Loot, winner of the Grand Jury's award for Best Narrative Feature at SXSW just a last week. In his latest entry at Artinfo, J Hoberman, who was on that jury, calls it "a funny, smart-mouthed, high-energy comedy about Bronx graffiti writers that's less a remake of the 80s indie hit Wild Style than a movie in the doomed caper tradition of Big Deal on Madonna Street. Not without some dubious stereotypes, the movie transcends them thanks to Leon's adroit direction and infectious self-enjoyment of its ensemble cast."

At GreenCine Daily, Steve Dollar agrees that it "has the run-and-gun mobility and funky vibe of a 1980s downtown comedy, evoking in various ways a kinship with the likes of Susan Seidelman,
See full article at MUBI »

He's Having a Baby; Film Movement Adopts Mélanie Laurent Starring 'The Day I Saw Your Heart'

Fans of Mélanie Laurent can count on the Film Movement folks to import one of her French title items a little bit past the midday point this year (third quarter), as the mini label picked up The Day I Saw Your Heart - a Jennifer Devoldère signed dramedy featuring Laurent, Michel Blanc and Florence Loiret Caille. Gist: Aka Et Soudain Tout le Monde me Manque (which translates to And Suddenly I Miss Everyone) Families are complicated… Especially when Eli, the father, who’s about to be 60, is expecting a baby with his new wife. Upon hearing this news, his two grown daughters, Dom, who is trying to adopt, and Justine, who flits from one boyfriend to the next, are shocked... Worth Noting: This is collaboration number two between the helmer and the actress: Mélanie Laurent previously toplined Devoldère's feature debut, Shoe at Your Foot (2009). Do We Care?: Despite whimsical
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

The Artist Triumphs At Cesar Awards As Oscars Loom

  • WENN
The Artist Triumphs At Cesar Awards As Oscars Loom
The Artist began what is sure to be an amazing weekend for the silent black and white movie by picking up six trophies at the Cesar Awards in France on Friday.

The Oscar favourite claimed the Best French Film of the Year, while moviemaker Michel Hazanavicius was honoured with the night's Best Director prize.

His wife Berenice Bejo was named Best Actress for her role as Peppy Miller in the film, but co-star Jean Dujardin lost the Best Actor honour to Untouchable's Omar Sy.

Going into Sunday's Oscars, The Artist has picked up more than 70 accolades around the world to become the most awarded French film in history, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Composer Ludovic Bource was also honoured at the Cesars for his The Artist score and the film's cinematographer Guillame Schiffman was also a winner.

Others taking home trophies on Friday included Nadira Ayadi and Clotilde Hesme, who shared the prize for Most Promising Actress, Gregory Gadebois, who was named Most Promising Actor and Michel Blanc (Best Supporting Actor).

Tous au Larzac took home the night's Best Documentary prize, while Asghar Farhadi’s Iranian film A Separation was named Best Foreign Film.

British actress Kate Winslet also came away a big winner after she was presented with an Honorary Cesar for her body of work by filmmaker Michel Gondry, who stepped in for her absent Carnage director Roman Polanski.

Winslet addressed the crowd in French, gushing, "You could have given it (award) to somebody else but you gave it to me, so thank you."

Winslet returned to the stage a little later to accept Polanski's Best Adapted Screenplay award for Carnage.

The 37th annual ceremony was held at the Chatelet Theater in Paris.
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