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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2007 | 2005 | 2003

12 items from 2017


Prejudice and Pride: The People’s History of Lgbtq Britain review – sad, joyous, sometimes both at once

3 August 2017 10:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Presented by Stephen K Amos and Susan Calman, this documentary told of the highs and lows in the long march for gay rights. Plus: 10 Puppies and Us

Prejudice and Pride: The People’s History of Lgbtq Britain last night concluded its illumination of the fight for gay (and other) rights via the medium of treasured possessions of people who have lived through it.

Teacher Austin Allen has kept his copy of Jenny Lives With Eric and Martin (“the sickest school book in Britain” claimed the Sun on its publication in 1987) – a sign of hope at a time when he had just been sacked for answering honestly a student’s inquiry about whether he was gay. Ian Elmslie has kept his programme from the one-night-only, unrecorded performance of Before the Act, a show comprising only material from gay writers and musicians and during which Neil Tennant, Stephen Fry and Alan Bennett officially came out. »

- Lucy Mangan

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Prick Up Your Ears review – Stephen Frears' terrific testament to murdered playwright Joe Orton

2 August 2017 10:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Rereleased 50 years after Orton’s death, this Frears-directed 1987 biopic sees Gary Oldman and Alfred Molina in utterly convincing form

The title of this rereleased classic is the invention of Joe Orton’s biographer John Lahr, on whose book this is based: for a brief 60s moment, this brilliant young dramatist really did force London’s theatre world to listen to his outrageous and very tumescent wit. Then, after a grisly, gloomy murder-suicide, it was all over. Orton was bludgeoned to death 50 years ago by his partner, Kenneth Halliwell, apparently convulsed with jealous rage at Orton’s success, undiminished cottaging and ingratitude for the stability and mentorship that Halliwell had given him. (Maybe Kenneth was in his way Orton’s Bosie, or his vengeful Marquess of Queensberry, or both.)

Stephen Frears’ terrific 1987 movie – adapted by Alan Bennett from the Lahr book – is back in cinemas and Gary Oldman’s superb livewire »

- Peter Bradshaw

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The Furniture: The Cluttered, Musty Madness of King George

5 June 2017 11:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

"The Furniture" is our weekly series on Production Design. You can click on the images to see them in magnified detail.

by Daniel Walber 

Play adaptations are frequently criticized for not being “cinematic” enough. It’s as perennial a complaint as it is a silly one. Many of the best play adaptations don’t abandon their more theatrical elements, they use cinema’s unique capabilities as an especially potent additive. 

The Madness of King George is a great example, a film that juxtaposes the visual freedom of on-location shooting with the precision of period sets. Adapted by Alan Bennett from his own play and directed by Nicholas Hytner, it chronicles the Regency Crisis of 1788. King George III (Nigel Hawthorne), perhaps as a result of porphyria, lost his grip on reality. The Prince of Wales (Rupert Everett) petitioned Parliament to have his father removed from power, and to have himself declared regent. »

- Daniel Walber

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Doctor Who series 10: Mark Gatiss interview

22 May 2017 3:41 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Louisa Mellor Jun 6, 2017

A few weeks ago, we chatted to Mark Gatiss about his Doctor Who series 10 episode, The Empress Of Mars…

This Saturday evening, Mark Gatiss will take us on a trip to Mars. 1881 Mars, to be precise, where the Doctor and Bill find themselves mystified by the presence of a group of Victorian colonists. Gatiss’ ninth Doctor Who episode is space historical The Empress Of Mars, which features the return of some familiar foes.

See related  Fargo season 3 episode 1 review: The Law Of Vacant Places Fargo: how to make great TV from a great film

A few weeks ago, we chatted to Gatiss about the episode, whether it will be his last for Doctor Who, series ten’s satirical side, and his take on the Steven Moffat era…

As a writer, you’re big on research, particularly for your Who historicals - you read up a lot on »

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The myth of The Madness Of King George

20 May 2017 6:16 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Simon Brew Jun 19, 2017

The Madness Of King George is a film that was sold off the back of a story that wasn’t true…

Nominated for four Oscars, and bringing the late, great Nigel Hawthorne to the attention of movie audiences (following his sensational work in television and on the stage), The Madness Of King George was a real breakout hit. Premiering in December 1994 (just two months after filming wrapped!), and released in the UK in March 1995, the film won one Academy Award, three BAFTAs, and grossed over $15m in the Us alone.

But there’s one story about the movie that continues to circle. And it’s to do with its title.

The film is based on Alan Bennett’s play, The Madness Of King George III, that tells the story of the health issues that King George III suffered during his reign in the 18th century. But when »

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Full list of winners from BAFTA’s 2017 British Academy Television Awards

14 May 2017 3:39 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The Crown may have led the nominations going in to BAFTA’s 2017 British Academy Television Awards, but the Netflix series ended the night empty handed, losing out on Best Drama Series to Happy Valley, which also saw Sarah Lancashire named Best Leading Actress.

Damilola, Our Loved Boy also picked up two awards in Best Single Drama and Best Supporting Actress (Wunmi Mosaku), while Adeel Akhtar (Murdered by My Father) and Tom Hollander (The Night Manager) were named Best Leading Actor and Best Supporting Actor respectively.

Check out a full list of winners here…

Leading actor

Adeel AkhtarMurdered By My Father (BBC3)

Babou Ceesay – Damilola, Our Loved Boy (BBC1)

Benedict CumberbatchThe Hollow Crown: The War of the Roses (BBC2)

Robbie ColtraneNational Treasure (Channel 4)

Leading actress

Claire FoyThe Crown (Netflix)

Jodie ComerThirteen (BBC3)

Nikki Amuka-BirdNw (BBC1)

Sarah LancashireHappy Valley (BBC1)

Supporting actor

Daniel Mays »

- Gary Collinson

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‘The Crown’ Loses Out at BAFTA TV Awards; ‘Happy Valley’ Scores

14 May 2017 1:51 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Netflix’s “The Crown” lost out in all the categories it was nominated in at BAFTA’s British Academy Television Awards, which were handed out Sunday night. The Netflix show had gone into the night a favorite after scoring five nominations in four categories, the most nominations of any show this year.

The Crown” lost out to BBC crime drama “Happy Valley” in best drama category, while Claire Foy was beaten by “Happy Valley” star Sarah Lancashire in the leading actress category. John Lithgow, Jared Harris and Vanessa Kirby all lost out in supporting categories.

Foy came away empty-handed for a second consecutive year in the leading actress category, having been nominated last year for “Wolf Hall” but losing to “Doctor Foster’s” Suranne Jones. In her acceptance speech, Lancashire acknowledged Foy, a Golden Globe winner for her role as a young Queen Elizabeth II, saying: “Claire Foy, you’ve given me my best 10 hours under a »

- Robert Mitchell

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The Guardian view on King Charles III: a foreboding play | Editorial

12 May 2017 11:03 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

The BBC2 broadcast of Mike Bartlett’s play is a reminder that even for republicans, the Queen’s death will loom large

King Charles III, Mike Bartlett’s play set in a future shortly after the Queen’s death, aired on the BBC this week. Its trim new television version was directed by Rupert Goold and starred, in what turned out to be his masterful swansong, the late Tim Pigott-Smith, who died suddenly between filming and broadcast. The drama, the stage premiere of which was at the Almeida in London before runs in the West End and on Broadway, is about a constitutional crisis precipitated by the new king’s refusal to sign a bill into law. As the country descends into riots and unrest, a subplot also emerges about a romance between Prince Harry and an ordinary London student (their idyll rudely interrupted by press intrusion). And the Duchess »

- Editorial

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Ben Whishaw, Alan Cumming, Russell Tovey to Headline BBC’s ‘Queers’

11 May 2017 7:23 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Ben Whishaw, Alan Cumming and Russell Tovey are set to headline “Queers,” a new series of one-off monologues for BBC Four curated and directed by “Sherlock” co-creator Mark Gatiss.

The eight-episode series, which is currently in production, is produced by BBC Studios in partnership with London’s famous Old Vic theater, which will stage all eight 15-minute monologues in July ahead of their television transmission.

The series was commissioned by the BBC to mark the 50th anniversary this year of the U.K.’s landmark Sexual Offenses Act, which partially de-criminalized sex between men. The monologues, written by eight different new and established writers, including Gatiss, will explore some of the most poignant, funny, tragic and riotous moments of British gay history and the personal rites of passage of British gay men through the last 100 years.

“James Bond” star Whishaw, who won a BAFTA Television Award for best actor for his role as Richard II in “The Hollow Crown »

- Robert Mitchell

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Our Friend Victoria review: a lovefest in honour of a silly, sweet and brilliant talent

11 April 2017 11:20 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

You won’t learn much in this tribute to VictoriaWood, but you’ll chuckle and feel warm in that uniquely BBC way. Plus: Peter Kay’s Car Share, a direct descendant of her brand of comedy

‘Inspiring, funny, genius, unique.” So says Maxine Peake of Victoria Wood in Our Friend Victoria (BBC1, 9.30pm), the first of a six-part tribute to the great comedian, actress, pianist, singer, director, screenwriter, and owner of the coolest pudding bowl haircut in history (actually, are there any others?). It’s hard to believe it’s only been a year since Vic – as everyone from Richard E Grant to Celia Imrie calls her – died at the age of 62. God, she was great. And God, things have fallen apart since we lost our friend from the north.

This is a lovefest in the time-honoured BBC tradition. Lots of fond, gentle and uncontroversial reminiscences trotted out by the usual suspects. »

- Chitra Ramaswamy

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The Crown leads BAFTA nominations for the 2017 British Academy Television Awards

11 April 2017 1:50 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

BAFTA has today announced the nominations for the 2017 British Academy Film Awards, with Netflix’s original drama The Crown leading the pack with five nods in total for Best Drama Series, Leading Actress (Claire Foy), Supporting Actress (Vanessa Kirby) and Supporting Actor (Jared Harris and John Lithgow). There are also multiple nominations for Damilola, Our Loved Boy, Fleabag, Happy Valley and Murdered By My Father. Check out a full list of the nominations here…

Leading actor

Adeel AkhtarMurdered By My Father (BBC3)

Babou Ceesay – Damilola, Our Loved Boy (BBC1)

Benedict CumberbatchThe Hollow Crown: The War of the Roses (BBC2)

Robbie ColtraneNational Treasure (Channel 4)

Leading actress

Claire FoyThe Crown (Netflix)

Jodie ComerThirteen (BBC3)

Nikki Amuka-BirdNw (BBC1)

Sarah LancashireHappy Valley (BBC1)

Supporting actor

Daniel MaysLine of Duty (BBC2)

Jared HarrisThe Crown (Netflix)

John LithgowThe Crown (Netflix)

Tom HollanderThe Night Manager »

- Gary Collinson

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The Trip To Spain: “Last Of The Summer Wine for Guardian readers”

5 April 2017 2:44 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Rob Leane Apr 6, 2017

Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan chat at length about their next adventure into eateries, The Trip To Spain...

Earlier this year, we were lucky enough to get early access to the first two episodes of The Trip To Spain, and to partake in a pair of group Q&A sessions with Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan, who continue reviewing restaurants and relentlessly ribbing each other in this third series of the show. (If you’re unfamiliar: series 1 was called The Trip and series 2 was The Trip To Italy.)

The episodes, to put it simply, were great; The Trip’s familiar blend of melancholy, meals and mockery slots seamlessly into this new Spanish locale, which serves up some idyllic landscapes to compliment the edibles, the impressions and the introspection.

Creator, writer and director Michael Winterbottom has found a winning formula here, and his stars seem to have an »

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2007 | 2005 | 2003

12 items from 2017


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