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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2007 | 2005 | 2003

1-20 of 31 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Alan Bennett's Diaries Live trailer: 'I long for a donkey' – exclusive video

27 September 2016 2:51 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Adam Low’s new documentary, Alan Bennett’s Diaries, follows the writer around the UK and to New York over the course of a year, reflecting on the importance of music in his life, his relationship with partner Rupert Thomas – and his desire to own a donkey

• The film will be broadcast across the UK on 16 November, followed by a live Q&A with Bennett from his local library in Primrose Hill

• Bennett’s new collection of diaries, Keeping On, Keeping On, is published on 20 October by Faber & Faber and Profile Books

Continue reading »

- Picturehouse Entertainment

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The BBC promises us an autumn of culture, but don’t expect any surprises | Rachel Cooke

10 September 2016 4:04 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

The corporation’s arts coverage bears the stamp of committee-led box-ticking. Why is there no devilment?

I am a pretty keen consumer of culture. I read two books a week, some for work but most for pleasure. I go to the theatre, ticket prices allowing, twice a month, and sometimes more, dividing these visits between big venues and smaller stages. I’m crazy about art, and I try to see as much as I can, both in London, where I live, and elsewhere; a train journey is nothing to me if there’s a decent gallery at the end of it. Between now and Christmas, I have tickets for half-a-dozen concerts. Lastly, there’s television, which I love.

You might, then, expect me to have been thrilled by the announcement that, this autumn, BBC2 will junk the repeats and devote Saturday nights to the arts, all the more so because »

- Rachel Cooke

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9 Lessons Studio Films Should Take From The Indie World This Summer

25 August 2016 9:54 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Much has been written about just how dismal this year’s summer movies have been, but one of the silver linings in such a poor season has remarkably been indies. Where blockbusters like “The Legend Of Tarzan,” “Warcraft” and “X-Men: Apocalypse” failed, indies such as “The Lobster,” “Cafe Society” and “Love and Friendship” succeeded. And while studios were certainly rolling in cash when it came to “Suicide Squad” and “The Secret Life Of Pets,” critics weren’t exactly impressed. It was a rough season for studio films, but it won’t be a total waste if executives can learn from their mistakes and start course correcting. Below, we look towards the indie world in order to offer up the biggest lessons for studio films.

Read More: IndieWire On Demand: ‘Krisha,’ ‘The Lobster’ And More Great 2016 Indies To Watch On VOD

1)  World-Building Needs To Be Organic To The Story (“The Lobster »

- Zack Sharf, Anne Thompson, Kate Erbland, Graham Winfrey, Steve Greene, William Earl and David Ehrlich

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How James Corden Conquered Late Night One 'Carpool Karaoke' at a Time

24 August 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Matt Damon is running toward the rooftop railing of an L.A. building, and people are afraid he's gonna die. James Corden is not one of them. Damon is reprising Jason Bourne, walking fast and looking over the right shoulder of his scuffed brown leather jacket. He then runs into a plump Brit who's dressed exactly the same. Damon smiles. It's Corden, the host of CBS' The Late Late Show, and the proud son of Hazlemere, Buckinghamshire, in England's unfashionable Home Counties. It's an hour before the taping of Corden's show, »

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How Meryl Streep Embraced Being Awful in ‘Florence Foster Jenkins’ – Video

12 August 2016 12:52 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

On the surface, Stephen Frears’ “Florence Foster Jenkins” looks like one of those soft, middlebrow, costume pictures aimed straight at the smart adult demo. Fine.

But it’s more than that. It’s a delicious, immersive escape into a lost New York of period cars and “men in tuxedos and women in evening gowns,” as Frears told me in an interview. He reveled in recreating that vintage Manhattan in London, and giving Meryl Streep and Hugh Grant a chance to shine.

Directors count on three-time Oscar-winner Streep to deliver for them, but this particular role marks an especially high degree of difficulty. Florence Foster Jenkins was a wealthy middle-aged music lover who couldn’t sing on key, but insisted on performing for increasingly larger audiences, who loved her anyway. She was infectiously entertaining.

“The script [by Nicholas Martin] was more or less what we shot, very good,” said Frears. “They sent me the link to YouTube. »

- Anne Thompson

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How Meryl Streep Embraced Being Awful in ‘Florence Foster Jenkins’ – Video

12 August 2016 12:52 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

On the surface, Stephen Frears’ “Florence Foster Jenkins” looks like one of those soft, middlebrow, costume pictures aimed straight at the smart adult demo. Fine.

But it’s more than that. It’s a delicious, immersive escape into a lost New York of period cars and “men in tuxedos and women in evening gowns,” as Frears told me in an interview. He reveled in recreating that vintage Manhattan in London, and giving Meryl Streep and Hugh Grant a chance to shine.

Directors count on three-time Oscar-winner Streep to deliver for them, but this particular role marks an especially high degree of difficulty. Florence Foster Jenkins was a wealthy middle-aged music lover who couldn’t sing on key, but insisted on performing for increasingly larger audiences, who loved her anyway. She was infectiously entertaining.

“The script [by Nicholas Martin] was more or less what we shot, very good,” said Frears. “They sent me the link to YouTube. »

- Anne Thompson

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Tonys: James Corden Heads Back to Broadway as Awards Host (Q&A)

7 June 2016 6:15 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

James Corden made his Broadway debut in 2006 as part of the ensemble of Alan Bennett's awards-laden The History Boys, about a bright sixth-form graduating class and their maverick teacher at a British boys' grammar school. He returned in 2012 in Richard Bean's rollicking commedia dell'arte update, One Man, Two Guvnors, which landed him a Tony for lead actor in a play. His next project for the New York stage was to be starring in a revival of the ancient Roman musical romp A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, following in the footsteps of Zero

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- David Rooney

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Too hot for TV: how BBC censorship went into hyperdrive

3 June 2016 8:40 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

As Auntie snips a line from A Midsummer Night’s Dream, on top of prudish tweaks to other recent dramas, it seems the right time to ask: is the corporation falling prey to our oversensitive age?

What do Titty Walker, Helena of Athens and Alan Bennett have in common? They have all recently been censored by the BBC.

In the forthcoming adaptation of Arthur Ransome’s Swallows and Amazons, Ms Walker will now be nicknamed “Tatty”, after fears that her original monicker might provoke schoolboy sniggers.

Continue reading »

- Mark Lawson

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Love, Nina review – naive nanny's view of literary London is a joy

20 May 2016 10:45 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Alan Bennett comes to tea at the Frears’ in this hilarious adaptation of a Leicester girl’s letters home from 1980s Camden

“Well, I come from Leicester, so I suppose I’ll have to say Leicester City,” says Nina near the start of Love, Nina (BBC1).

You don’t get anyone supposing they’ll have to support Leicester City these days, but it isn’t these days. It’s 1982. Nina Stibbe has come to London to interview for the job of nanny to the two boys of a grand literary editor in their big Camden home, with paintings on the walls, cracks between the floorboards, distinguished neighbours, etc. It’s the boys doing the interviewing: this makes sense, as their mother says, because “they’re the ones who have to get on with you”. Hence the football questions.

Related: Nina Stibbe's letter to her younger self: 'Try not to »

- Sam Wollaston

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DVD Obscura: The New Indie and International Movies You Need to Watch

19 May 2016 10:00 PM, PDT | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

New Indie: The Lady in the Van (Sony Home Entertainment) had all the markings of an awards season contender: It was the latest film from BAFTA and Tony Award–winning director Nicholas Hytner (The History Boys); it was based on beloved British writer Alan Bennett’s memoir; and, most importantly, it starred Dame Maggie Smith as the titular Lady. That so few people saw the movie during its theatrical release and that it earned so little award recognition is just one of those film-history mysteries. All the same, this story of an elderly woman who parks her van in Bennett’s driveway, and then lives there for the next 15 years, is a very audience-friendly bit of feel-good-ism (and name an Academy voter whose head can’t be turned by that sort of thing), one...

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- Alonso Duralde

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Nina Stibbe's letter to her younger self: 'Try not to have a weave perm'

18 May 2016 3:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

As her comic bestseller Love, Nina is televised, the author writes a letter to her twentysomething self, with tips on how to survive the literary London of the 1980s

Nina Stibbe’s Love, Nina was one of the publishing coups of 2013 – a collection of letters written to her sister when she was an incredulous Leicestershire country girl who had fetched up in the heart of literary London in the early 1980s. Hired to look after the two small sons of London Review of Books editor Mary-Kay Wilmers, 20-year-old Stibbe found herself taking cooking tips from Alan Bennett (who he?), borrowing – and losing – a saw from Jonathan Miller and spotting Samuel Beckett in the audience for his own play (“people talking nonsense in dustbins and making funny noises” – you know, that one).

Priceless anecdotes about the literati pepper an affectionately observed account of bohemian family life in a five-year correspondence which »

- Nina Stibbe

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What happened to Alan Bennett in Nick Hornby’s Love, Nina?

14 May 2016 5:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

He is one of Britain’s most famous authors, depicted in films, plays and books – including Nina Stibbe’s hit memoir. So why doesn’t Bennett appear in its new TV adaptation?

Versions of Alan Bennett have been hard to escape over the last six months. First came Nicholas Hytner’s film of The Lady in the Van, featuring three depictions of its author – Alex Jennings as both “Alan Bennett”, a diffident north London resident in the 70s and 80s, and “Ab” the observing writer, plus a present-day cameo from Bennett himself.

Besides his 2015 diary in the Lrb, edited by his friend Mary-Kay Wilmers, subsequent sightings have included a regional revival of the autobiographical play Untold Stories, and the Radio 4 comedy Boswell’s Life of Bennett, in which the time-travelling biographer (Miles Jupp) repeatedly urges the Yorkshireman (Alistair McGowan) to reveal his secrets – “the cream cracker under the settee” – only »

- John Dugdale

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The Furniture: The Lady with the Van Paints a Crime Scene Into a Home

25 April 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

"The Furniture" is our new design series. Here's Daniel Walber...

The Lady in the Van begins with a bloody hit-and-run accident. The title van-driving lady, played by Maggie Smith, collides with a young man and leaves him for dead. On the lam, bound by necessity to a vehicle that may also be a murder weapon, she finds her way to a quiet neighborhood full of artists and bourgeois intellectuals.

Then it turns into a delightful comedy about the social anxieties of Alan Bennett.

It’s a bit abrupt, to be honest. And it may take a fair while to warm up to the neurotic, Adaptation.-style doppelgangers that represent the split personalities of the playwright protagonist. The vans themselves, though, quite effectively capture a much more gradual transition, one that charts Mary/Margaret’s arc with care. What begins as an all-in-one murder weapon and crime scene becomes a home. »

- Daniel Walber

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New to Streaming: ‘Tale of Tales,’ ‘The Foot Fist Way,’ ‘My Big Night,’ ‘Magical Girl,’ and More

22 April 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit the interwebs. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead: The Story of the National Lampoon (Douglas Tirola)

While the last few decades or so of National Lampoon’s output has been less than stellar, their influence through their humor magazine and films such as the original Vacation and Animal House can still be felt today. For those curious about the formation of the group and their rise to ubiquitous status, a »

- TFS Staff

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Victoria Wood: no sneering, no bile, just very, very funny | Letters

22 April 2016 10:33 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Like many a comic genius, there was in many ways a hesitancy, even a humility to Victoria Wood the person (Lucy Mangan, 21 April), which was of course one of her finest qualities. She was to read at the thanksgiving service in Westminster Abbey for Dame Thora Hird from the dame’s autobiography. First she had to walk up the steps from her seat into the sacrarium at the east end of the abbey with Alan Bennett, who was giving the address. Rehearsing her, as one of the priests on the staff – itself, ludicrously unnecessary – I ventured to suggest that she needed to personalise her presence and the reading by introducing it.

“I don’t want to get in the way,” she responded.

Continue reading »

- Letters

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The Guardian view on Victoria Wood: funny, northern, female, ours | Editorial

20 April 2016 11:22 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Multitalented, and with an ability to use humour for a serious purpose, she embodied a special sort of Englishness

National treasure is an overused term. But the prime minister was right to use it about Victoria Wood, because it’s exactly what she was. Wood combined Alan Bennett’s ear for dialogue, Noël Coward’s songwriting skills, Ronnie Barker’s comic acting talent and Ken Dodd’s command of gag-cracking. She had the loveability of a Gracie Fields or an Eric Morecambe and at her best she could channel some of the same humanist poignancy as a Chaplin or a Chekhov. Let’s be clear, though, what kind of national treasure Wood actually was. She died in London on Wednesday, but Wood was a northern, English, working-class, Lancastrian and Mancunian female treasure. She was the authentic voice of an optimistic, decent, unpretentious, take-people-as-they-come, mucking-in sort of Britishness that is almost »

- Editorial

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What's New on Netflix, TV, Digital, and DVD/Blu-ray This Week: April 18-24

18 April 2016 8:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

At a loss for what to watch this week? From new DVDs and Blu-rays, to what's new on Netflix and TV, we've got you covered.

New on DVD and Blu-ray

"The Revenant"

Leo's ready to come home with you this week. Leonardo DiCaprio had a bear of a time making this historical drama, but he won his first Oscar for it, and Alejandro Inarritu won his second in a row for directing. "The Revenant," which also picked up an Oscar for Cinematography, is finally out on DVD/Blu-ray on April 19. Blu-ray extras include "A World Unseen," a documentary of "The Revenant."

"The Lady in the Van"

Maggie Smith plays Miss Shepherd in this British dramedy based on the true story of an eccentric elderly woman who "temporarily" parks her van in Alan Bennett's driveway and proceeds to live there for 15 years. The critically acclaimed film, based on Bennett's memoir, »

- Gina Carbone

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Wamg Giveaway – Lady In The Van Blu-ray and Screenplay

13 April 2016 7:36 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“The Virgin Mary. I spoke to her yesterday. She was outside the post office.”

The Lady In The Van, the British comedy-drama based on Alan Bennett’s memoir about an eccentric elderly woman who “temporarily” parks her van in Mr. Bennett’s driveway and proceeds to live there for 15 years, arrives on Blu-ray™, DVD & Digital HD April 19 from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. This critically acclaimed Sony Pictures Classics film features the magnificent Maggie Smith (TV’s “Downton Abbey”), whose portrayal of Miss Mary Shepherd earned her a Golden Globe® nomination for Best Actress in a Motion Picture. Alex Jennings (Babel) heads the ensemble cast, along with James Corden (TV’s “The Late Late Show with James Corden”), Dominic Cooper (My Week with Marilyn), and Jim Broadbent (Brooklyn). The Lady In The Van was written by Oscar®-nominated playwright Alan Bennett (The Madness of King George) and directed by BAFTA and »

- Tom Stockman

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The Lady in the Van hits Blu-ray and Digital April 19

7 March 2016 10:10 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Downton Abbey's Maggie Smith is The Lady in the Van, on Blu-ray, DVD, and Digital HD April 19!

The Lady In The Van, the British comedy-drama based on Alan Bennett’s memoir about an eccentric elderly woman who “temporarily” parks her van in Mr. Bennett’s driveway and proceeds to live there for 15 years, arrives on Blu-ray™, DVD & Digital HD April 19 from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment.

The critically acclaimed Sony Pictures Classics film features the magnificent Maggie Smith (TV’s “Downton Abbey”), whose portrayal of Miss Mary Shepherd earned her a Golden Globe® nomination for Best Actress in a Motion Picture. Alex Jennings (Babel) heads the ensemble cast, along with James Corden (TV’s “The Late Late Show with James Corden”), Dominic Cooper (My Week with Marilyn), and Jim Broadbent (Brooklyn). The Lady In The Van was written by Oscar®-nominated playwright Alan Bennett (The Madness of King George) and »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Victor Medina)

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DVD Review: Lady in the Van

7 March 2016 3:05 AM, PST | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★☆☆ British director Nicholas Hytner returns to the work of playwright Alan Bennett for new film The Lady in the Van, an adaptation of Bennett's hit West End play of the same name. that Hytner also directed for the stage. Reprising her role from the original 1999 theatrical production, as well as the 2009 Radio 4 version, Maggie Smith stars as the titular lady, Miss Shepherd who - up until serial melodrama Downton Abbey came along - was perhaps her most iconic role. The film tells the 'mostly' true story of Bennett's (played once again by Alex Jennings) real life, strained relationship with one Mary Shepherd, an eccentric, cantankerous and hygienically uncouth homeless woman who, one day in the 1970s, rocks up in her van on a staunchly conservative residential street in the London Borough of Camden.

»

- CineVue UK

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