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16 items from 2017


From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century

28 July 2017 1:01 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Updated: Following a couple of Julie London Westerns*, Turner Classic Movies will return to its July 2017 Star of the Month presentations. On July 27, Ronald Colman can be seen in five films from his later years: A Double Life, Random Harvest (1942), The Talk of the Town (1942), The Late George Apley (1947), and The Story of Mankind (1957). The first three titles are among the most important in Colman's long film career. George Cukor's A Double Life earned him his one and only Best Actor Oscar; Mervyn LeRoy's Random Harvest earned him his second Best Actor Oscar nomination; George Stevens' The Talk of the Town was shortlisted for seven Oscars, including Best Picture. All three feature Ronald Colman at his very best. The early 21st century motto of international trendsetters, from Venezuela's Nicolás Maduro and Turkey's Recep Erdogan to Russia's Vladimir Putin and the United States' Donald Trump, seems to be, The world is reality TV and reality TV »

- Andre Soares

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Newswire: Warner Bros. better let us see what Superman looks like with a mustache

24 July 2017 7:12 PM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

On the ‘60s Batman TV show, Cesar Romero famously refused to shave his mustache for his role as the Joker, requiring the makeup people to simply paint over it. Now, the Justice League movie is facing another mustache crisis, but technology has come so far in the last few decades that nobody needs to laboriously paint over their facial hair. Instead, computers can magically wipe canon-breaking mustaches away in an instant.

The Justice League movie is currently going through extensive reshoots with Joss Whedon (stepping in for director Zack Snyder, who decided to spend time with his family), but the reshoots are dragging on so long that they’re cutting into the cast’s other projects. This is mostly an issue for Superman actor Henry Cavill, who had to grow a mustache for his role in the next Mission: Impossible movie. Paramount won’t let him shave the mustache for »

- Sam Barsanti

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Batman: White Knight - A Story Where The Joker Must Save Gotham From Batman

9 July 2017 9:30 PM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

DC Entertainment

Batman and The Joker, what would one be without the other? For decades now the two have squared off in comic books, television shows and films. So far every film franchise for Batman has include the Clown Prince of Crime. Cesar Romero, Jack Nicholson, Heath Ledger, the voice of Mark Hamill and Jared Leto are the names that have voiced, or played, The Joker in the past. Along with the obvious differences, each of them had been molded to compliment the Batman of the time. What would happen if we put Gotham and these two characters in a present time with modern-day problems? Would Batman's style of vigilante justice still work in our day and age? Would he even still be a hero?

Enter DC Comic's Batman: White Knight by writer illustrator Sean Murphy. In his comic book mini series that is set to be released »

- Emmanuel Gomez

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John Lithgow Regrets Saying No to Joker in Tim Burton's Batman

14 June 2017 1:04 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

It's been widely reported for years that John Lithgow was in the running to play the Joker in Tim Burton's 1989 vision of Batman, which was originally going to be directed by Gremlins helmer Joe Dante. But Lithgow is now, nearly 30 years later, finally commenting on his decision to not take the role. The role obviously went to Jack Nicholson, who went on to universal acclaim for his portrayal of the Joker. Before Nicholson, it was Caesar Romero's version on the campy 1960s television series, which Nicholson ditched in favor of a darker, more sinister take on the villain.

Back in 1989, a Batman movie by Tim Burton and starring Michael Keaton was a bit of a gamble. Lithgow spoke to Vulture about his regret of not taking the role and his circumstances around that time. Lithgow explains.

"My worst audition was for Tim Burton for Batman. I have never told anyone this story, »

- MovieWeb

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Adam West obituary

10 June 2017 6:56 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Legendary Batman actor struggled to throw off his alter ego in later career but remained beloved of fans

Adam West, who has died aged 88, was one of those actors who had to strive to “live down” not a failure but his greatest success. West, who was synonymous with the role of Batman in the vastly popular, campy TV series of 1966-68, could never escape his alter ego. Although he appeared in scores of films and television series throughout his long career, most reviewers, whatever the role, insisted on referring to him as “TV’s Batman”. However, it is fair to say that West, realising that he owed his fame to the Caped Crusader, was not averse to making oblique allusions to the character in some of his films, and often resorted to self-mockery.

The tall, well-built West, with chiselled good looks and a resonant baritone voice, was perfect casting for »

- Ronald Bergan

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A Batman Falls: R.I.P. Adam West

10 June 2017 6:32 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Adam West, who was beloved for generations as the man under the crimefighting cowl in the 1960s Batman TV series, passed away yesterday at the age of 88. West had an acting career going back to the 1950s. Today, Cinelinx pays homage to a gentleman who loved his fans, as we say goodbye to Adam West 

Adam West loved playing Batman. Beginning with the Batman Tv show (1966-1969), he continued being involved with DC Batman projects, including Batman: the Movie (1966), The Super Friends (or Super Powers Team), the New Adventures of Batman, Tarzan and the Super Seven, The Legends of the Super heroes, Batman: the Animated Series, the Batman: New Times video game, The 2004-2006 Batman cartoon, Batman: the Brave & the Bold, Robot Chicken, Batman: Return of the Caped Crusaders, and the upcoming Batman vs. Two-Face. Through all these projects, for over five decades, West voiced either the Batman or one of his supporting cast. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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Why Adam West Was the One and Only Batman

10 June 2017 3:47 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

What's this? Could this be the end for Batman? Rest in peace, Adam West, the one and only Caped Crusader who truly defined the role. There have been so many incarnations of Batman over the years – on the page and on the screen – but Adam West was the one flesh-and-blood actor who ever did justice to the cape, on the Sixties TV series Batman.

West, who died of leukemia Friday at the age of 88, brought deadpan humor and old-school gallantry to the role, week after week; same Bat Time, same Bat Channel. »

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Adam West, T.V's Batman, Dead At Age 88

10 June 2017 10:24 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Lee Pfeiffer

Adam West, one of the most enduring pop culture figures of the 1960s, has passed away at age 88 after a battle with leukemia. West was a hunky young actor laboring in bit parts in films such as "The Young Philadelphians", "Robinson Crusoe on Mars" and co-starring with the Three Stooges in their last feature film "The Outlaws is Coming!" when he got the opportunity to audition for the role of Batman in ABC's new TV series. The essence of the show was that it would be played as a broad comedy. West impressed the producers with his ability to pretend his character wasn't in on the joke. West played Batman and his alter ego Bruce Wayne as stalwart, incorrupt heroes. He approved young Burt Ward to play the role of Robin despite not having any previous acting experience. The show, which premiered in January 1966, took off like »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Adam West, TV’s ‘Batman,’ Dies at 88

10 June 2017 8:19 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Adam West — an actor defined and also constrained by his role in the 1960s series “Batman” — died Friday night in Los Angeles. He was 88. A rep said that he died after a short battle with leukemia.

“Our dad always saw himself as The Bright Knight, and aspired to make a positive impact on his fans’ lives. He was and always will be our hero,” his family said in a statement.

With its “Wham! Pow!” onscreen exclamations, flamboyant villains and cheeky tone, “Batman” became a surprise hit with its premiere on ABC in 1966, a virtual symbol of ’60s kitsch. Yet West’s portrayal of the superhero and his alter ego, Bruce Wayne, ultimately made it hard for him to get other roles, and while he continued to work throughout his career, options remained limited because of his association with the character.

West also chafed against the darker versions of Bob Kane »

- Brian Lowry

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Adam West, TV’s ‘Batman,’ Dies at 88

10 June 2017 8:19 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Adam West — an actor defined and also constrained by his role in the 1960s series “Batman” — died Friday night in Los Angeles. He was 88. A rep said that he died after a short battle with leukemia.

“Our dad always saw himself as The Bright Knight, and aspired to make a positive impact on his fans’ lives. He was and always will be our hero,” his family said in a statement.

West became known to a new generation of TV fans through his recurring voice role on Fox’s “Family Guy” as Mayor Adam West, the horribly corrupt, inept and vain leader of Quahog, Rhode Island. West was a regular on the show from 2000 through its most recent season. West in recent years did a wide range of voice-over work, on such shows as Adult Swim’s “Robot Chicken” and Disney Channel’s “Jake and the Neverland Pirates.”

But it was his role as the Caped Crusader in »

- Brian Lowry

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Marlene Dietrich Retrospective Screening at the Metrograph in NYC

24 May 2017 2:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Marlene Dietrich in “Shanghai Express”: mptvimages.com/IMDb

If you’re a fan of actress, camp icon, and anti-fascist Marlene Dietrich or want to learn more about her, you’re in luck. The Metrograph theater in New York City is hosting “Marlene,” a retrospective featuring 19 of Dietrich’s films. The festivities kicked off May 23 and will continue until July 8.

Marie Magdalene “Marlene” Dietrich was born in Berlin in 1901. Dietrich began her career as a vaudeville performer in Weimar Germany. She moved to Hollywood and eventually became a revered film actress, “bisexual sex symbol, willful camp icon, [and] paragon of feminine glamour” — “comfortable in top hat and tails, ballgown, or gorilla suit.” But the actress did not forget about what was happening back home in Germany; Dietrich became involved in the fight against fascism during WWII. She “used her likeness to fundraise for Jewish refugees escaping Nazi Germany and performed on Uso tours, earning her the Metal of Freedom and Légion d’honneur by the French government,” the press release details. Dietrich died in 1992 at the age of 90.

The “Marlene” retrospective will feature Dietrich’s seven films with director Josef von Sternberg: “The Blue Angel,” “Morocco,” “Blonde Venus,” “Dishonored,” “Shanghai Express,” “The Devil Is A Woman,” and “The Scarlet Empress.” The actress’ collaborations with Alfred Hitchcock (“Stage Fright”), Orson Welles (“Touch of Evil”), and Billy Wilder (“A Foreign Affair”) are among the other films screening at the Metrograph. A documentary about Dietrich, Maximilian Schell’s “Marlene,” will also screen. All of the films, besides “Marlene,” will be shown in 35mm.

Head over to The Metrograph’s site for showtimes and more information. The featured films and their synopses are below, courtesy of the Metrograph.

Angel

1937 / 91min / 35mm

Director: Ernst Lubitsch

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Herbert Marshall, Melvyn Douglas

While English statesman Herbert Marshall worries over international affairs, his glamorous wife (Dietrich) concerns herself with, well, international affairs, beginning a tryst with a dashing stranger (Melvyn Douglas) who she only allows to know her as “Angel.” Dietrich’s last film on her Paramount contract is a spry, surprising love triangle, one of the least-known of Lubitsch’s essential works from his Midas touch period.

Blonde Venus

1932 / 93min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Herbert Marshall, Cary Grant

A.k.a “The One with the Gorilla Suit,” which Dietrich dons to perform her big number “Hot Voodoo.” It’s all for a good cause: she’s an ex-nightclub chanteuse who’s gone back to work to pay for husband Herbert Marshall’s radium poisoning treatments, though she later allows herself to become the plaything of Cary Grant’s dashing young millionaire, earning only contempt for her sacrifice.

Der Blaue Engel

1930 / 106min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Emil Jannings, Kurt Gerron, Rosa Valetti

Mild-mannered, uptight schoolteacher Emil Jannings lives a faultlessly law-abiding, by-the-book existence, but it’s all over when he gets a glimpse of Dietrich’s nightclub chanteuse Lola-Lola, and is immediately ready to ruin himself for her amusement. The first collaboration between Dietrich and von Sternberg made her an international star, and linked her forever to her seductive, world-weary delivery of the song “Falling in Love Again.” We’re showing the German-language version, preceded by a four-minute-long Dietrich screen test.

Desire

1936 / 95min / 35mm

Director: Frank Borzage

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Gary Cooper, John Halliday, William Frawley

Dietrich and Gary Cooper reunite in this delightful urbane comedy by Borzage, a master of romantic delirium, here working somewhat after the style of producer Ernst Lubitsch. La Dietrich’s stylish jewel thief stashes a clutch of pearls in the pocket of an upstanding American businessman, and while trying to get back the goods she can’t help but notice the big lug isn’t half bad-looking. An excuse to recall the following lines from the 1936 Times review: “Lubitsch, the Gay Emancipator, has freed Dietrich from von Sternberg’s artistic bondage.” Those were the days.

Destry Rides Again

1939 / 94min / 35mm

Director: George Marshall

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, James Stewart, Mischa Auer, Charles Winninger

Jimmy Stewart, still in his rangy, impossibly-good-looking phase, is a marshal who sets out to clean up the wide-open town of Bottleneck without firing a shot in this charming Western musical comedy. The local roughnecks present him one kind of challenge; Dietrich’s saloon singer Frenchy, belting out her rowdy standard “The Boys in the Back Room,” quite another.

The Devil Is A Woman

1935 / 80min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Lionel Atwill, Edward Everett Horton

Dietrich and von Sternberg’s final collaboration, and an apotheosis of sorts. In Spain in the early years of the 20th century, Lionel Atwill’s loyal suitor Pasqualito and the revolutionary Cesar Romero are teased into a frenzy by legendary coquette Concha (Guess who?). The coolly scrolling camera and baroque compositions are courtesy of an uncredited Lucien Ballard and Von Sternberg himself, doing double duty as cinematographer.

Dishonored

1931 / 91min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Victor McLaglen

Dietrich plays X-27, a Mata Hari-esque spy for the Austrian Secret Service tasked with using a bevy of costume changes (Russian peasant, feathered helmet, leather jumpsuit) to gather information on the Russians during World War I. Outrageous plotting, high chiaroscuro style, and the star’s earthy sensuality mark this unforgettable pre-code treasure, beloved by Godard and Fassbinder both. Says Victor McLaglen: “the more you cheat and the more you lie, the more exciting you become.”

A Foreign Affair

1948 / 116min / 35mm

Director: Billy Wilder

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Jean Arthur, John Lund, Millard Mitchell

Against the backdrop of a ruined postwar Berlin, another conflict is just heating up, as Dietrich’s cabaret singer with rumored Nazi ties vies with Jean Arthur’s Iowa congresswoman-on-a-fact-finding-mission for the affection of American officer John Lund. Wilder’s penultimate collaboration with co-writer Charles Brackett is a black comic delight full of crackling, piquant dialogue, and Dietrich’s knowing slow-burn has never been better.

Judgment At Nuremberg

1961 / 186min / 35mm

Director: Stanley Kramer

Cast: Spencer Tracy, Burt Lancaster, Richard Widmark, Marlene Dietrich, Maximilian Schell, Judy Garland, Montgomery Clift, William Shatner

Dietrich’s last truly substantial screen appearance came as part of the ensemble for Kramer’s courtroom drama, playing the widow of a German general executed by the Allies who’s befriended by investigating judge Spencer Tracy in this fictionalized retelling of the events of a 1947 military tribunal addressing war crimes by civilians under the Third Reich. Rounding out the all-star cast are Burt Lancaster, Richard Widmark, Judy Garland, William Shatner, and Maximilian Schell, who would win the Academy Award for Best Actor, and later directed a portrait of Dietrich.

The Lady Is Willing

1942 / 92min / 35mm

Director: Mitchell Leisen

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Fred MacMurray, Aline MacMahon, Stanley Ridges

Leisen, considered a comic talent on-par with Lubitsch during the screwball era, lends characteristic sparkle to this mid-career attempt at reconfiguring Dietrich’s very 1930s star persona to fit the needs of the 1940s women’s picture; here she plays a glamor-gal diva whose life changes when she discovers a baby on Eighth Avenue and decides to adopt, passing through melodramatic coincidences and a vale of tears before falling into the arms of Fred MacMurray.

Lola

1981 / 113min / 35mm

Director: Rainer Werner Fassbinder

Cast: Barbara Sukowa, Armin Mueller-stahl, Mario Adorf, Matthias Fuchs

Dietrich had for all purposes retired from the screen by the time that Fassbinder began his frontal assault on West German popular culture, but her image and her unlikely combination of cool irony and torrid emotion left a profound mark on his films. Lola, the candy-colored, late-1950s-set capstone of his “Brd Trilogy” in particular draws heavily from The Blue Angel, with bordello singer Barbara Sukowa torn between Mario Adorf’s sugar daddy and Armin Mueller-Stahl’s incoming building commissioner in boomtown Coburg.

Marlene

1984 / 94min / Digital

Director: Maximilian Schell

More than twenty years after Schell had co-starred with Dietrich in Judgment at Nuremberg, during which period she’d retired to a life of very private seclusion, he tried to get her to participate in a documentary about her life. She finally gave in — sort of. Dietrich offered only her memories and her famous voice, refusing to appear on camera, but necessity became a boon to the resulting film, a sort of guided tour of Dietrich’s life and work, which simultaneously reveals much and deepens her mystery.

Morocco

1930 / 92min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Gary Cooper, Adolphe Menjou

After The Blue Angel, shot in Germany, was a hit, von Sternberg was given full run of the Paramount backlot, where he would conjure up all manner of exotic destinations out of thin air. First stop: North Africa, where French legionnaire Gary Cooper competes with sugar daddy Adolphe Menjou for the favors of Dietrich’s cabaret star Amy Jolly, who in one scene famously rocks a men’s tailcoat and plants a smooch on a female fan.

Rancho Notorious

1952 / 89min / 35mm

Director: Fritz Lang

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Arthur Kennedy, Mel Ferrer, William Frawley

Teutons Lang and Dietrich team up in a Technicolor wild west of deliberate, garish artifice in this singularly claustrophobic oater, in which a revenge-mad Burt Kennedy goes looking for his fiancée’s killers at a hideaway inn run by Dietrich, and discovers dangerous, unbidden desires instead. As the chant of the film’s recurring, persecutorial Brechtian ballad goes: “Hate, murder, and revenge.”

The Scarlet Empress

1934 / 104min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, John Lodge, Sam Jaffe, Louise Dresser

Have ever a screen persona and a historical personage found such a hand-in-glove-fit as did Dietrich and Empress Catherine the Great of Russia? While the Motion Picture Production Code was preparing to chasten American movies, Dietrich and von Sternberg got together to throw one last lavish S & M orgy, a flamboyant film of 18th century palace intrigues and ludicrously lapidary décor.

Shanghai Express

1932 / 82min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Clive Brook, Anna May Wong

“It took more than one man to change my name to Shanghai Lily,” proclaims Marlene Dietrich with the disdain of an empress, though in fact she’s a high-class courtesan, re-encountering former lover Clive Brook on an express train rolling through civil war-wracked China. The fourth of Dietrich and von Sternberg’s collaborations is a riot of delirious chinoiserie artifice and sculpted shadowplay — Dietrich’s co-star Anna May Wong was never again shot so caressingly.

The Song Of Songs

1933 / 90min / 35mm

Director: Rouben Mamoulian

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Brian Aherne, Lionel Atwill

So often the instrument of corruption, Mamoulian’s film allows Dietrich to be the corrupted one, playing a country girl, Lily, who comes to big-city Berlin and quickly becomes the model and muse of sculptor Brian Aherne. Lionel Atwill’s preening decadent Baron von Merzbach admires Lily’s nude form in marble, and decides to bring the original home with him, where she slips into the role of the cynical sophisticate, though her heart remains with the artist.

Stage Fright

1950 / 110min / 35mm

Director: Alfred Hitchcock

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Jane Wyman, Michael Wilding, Richard Todd, Alastair Sim

Hitchcock’s last film in his native England until 1972’s Frenzy is an audaciously-structured thriller, making use of an extended flashback and a whiplash narrative about-face. Acting student Jane Wyman tries to save beau Robert Todd from taking the fall for a murder committed by stage star Dietrich, who shows her hypnotic charm in a show-stopper performance of “I’m the Laziest Gal in Town.”

Touch Of Evil

1958 / 95min / 35mm

Director: Orson Welles

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Charlton Heston, Janet Leigh, Orson Welles

It’s not the size of the part, but what you do with it. Playing a brothel keeper in a seedy border town in Welles’s magnificently baroque late noir, Dietrich only has a clutch of lines, but they’re the ones you remember, whether her famous requiem for crooked cop Hank Quinlan, or her reading of his “fortune”: “Your future’s all used up.” Bold and self-evidently brilliant, you could use Touch of Evil to explain the concept of great cinema to a visiting Martian.

Marlene Dietrich Retrospective Screening at the Metrograph in NYC was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Rachel Montpelier

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Celebrating 77 Years Of The Joker: 10 Of His Best Moments

25 April 2017 2:27 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

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Today is a special day for DC Comics. April 25, 2017 marks the 77th anniversary of the Joker‘s first appearance in Batman #1 in 1940. Closing in on 80 years, this iconic villain has terrorized and terrified the citizens of Gotham, as he’s become a huge and cherished part of popular culture. Show his image to any person around the world and they’re certain to know exactly who he is.

Throughout the years, we’ve seen different variations of the popular character, from Cesar Romero’s goofy prankster, to Heath Ledger’s anarchic psychopath, to even Jared Leto’s tattooed gangster. Nonetheless, no era of Batman has ever been truly complete without the addition of the Clown Prince of Crime in the universe as well (Rebirth, you better hurry up because you’re slacking at the moment).

Since it’s his special day, »

- Sergio Pereira

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‘The Golden Girls’ on Hulu: A Guide to 29 Wacky Moments to Watch Out For While You Binge

13 February 2017 9:40 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In the gallery above, we’ve picked 29 moments among a multitude from “The Golden Girls,” the ‘80s-‘90s comedy that is available to binge in its entirety on Hulu now. Click through for a rough guide to what’s in store when you revisit Dorothy, Blanche, Rose and Sophia.

Read More: Friends of Dorothy: Was ‘The Golden Girls’ Really as Queer-Friendly as Its Reputation Suggests?

Created by Susan Harris, who had also created the controversial but critically acclaimed sitcom “Soap,” “The Golden Girls” was unlike anything America had seen before on TV. It centered on four older women living in one house in Miami, who, despite the gray in their hair (some of it camouflaged with dye), still had plenty of zest for life, sex, and troublemaking.

Based on their performances on “Maude” and “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” Rue McClanahan and Betty White were cast first. Director Jay Sandrich »

- Hanh Nguyen

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‘The Golden Girls’ on Hulu: A Guide to 29 Wacky Moments to Watch Out For While You Binge

13 February 2017 9:40 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

In the gallery above, we’ve picked 29 moments among a multitude from “The Golden Girls,” the ‘80s-‘90s comedy that is available to binge in its entirety on Hulu now. Click through for a rough guide to what’s in store when you revisit Dorothy, Blanche, Rose and Sophia.

Read More: Friends of Dorothy: Was ‘The Golden Girls’ Really as Queer-Friendly as Its Reputation Suggests?

Created by Susan Harris, who had also created the controversial but critically acclaimed sitcom “Soap,” “The Golden Girls” was unlike anything America had seen before on TV. It centered on four older women living in one house in Miami, who, despite the gray in their hair (some of it camouflaged with dye), still had plenty of zest for life, sex, and troublemaking.

Based on their performances on “Maude” and “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” Rue McClanahan and Betty White were cast first. Director Jay Sandrich »

- Hanh Nguyen

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Watch Us Pull a Rabbit Out of our Hat

23 January 2017 7:10 AM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

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A quick look at the slinky sleight-of-hand involved in making movies about magic.

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Categories Not categorized 0% Your result has been entered into leaderboard Loading Name: E-Mail: Captcha: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Answered Review Question 1 of 10 1. Question

In 1932’s Chandu The Magician, Edmund Lowe plays the titular wizard. What famous boogie man plays his adversary?

Bela Lugosi Boris Karloff Peter Lorre Correct

Lugosi is a lot of fun but the real star of this movie is director William Cameron Menzies whose distinctive visual style graces every scene.

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Question 2 of 10 2. Question

1953’s Houdini »

- TFH

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17 Midseason Replacements That Hit the Jackpot

2 January 2017 7:15 AM, PST | TVfanatic | See recent TVfanatic news »

Sometimes waiting in the wings is the best time for a show to premiere, especially in this age of Peak TV. It doesn't have to compete with the glutton of Fall shows vying for viewers attention.

Some midseason shows never make it, but others are a real hit with audiences and critics alike.

Here is a list of 17 shows that hit the jackpot as midseason replacements. What shows do you think might be next?

1. Batman (ABC) The campiest of all TV hit the small screen on January 12,1966 replacing The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet which moved to Saturdays. Starring Adam West as Batman and Burt Ward as Robin, the series ran for only three seasons but became an instant cult classic. Many famous entertainers appeared on the show including Cesar Romero as The Joker, Eartha Kitt as Catwoman, and Burgess Meredith as the Penguin. Milton Burle and Vincent Price also made villainous appearances. »

- Lisa Babick

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16 items from 2017


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