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1-20 of 28 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Daily | Goings On | Godard, Malle, Hong

17 August 2016 8:50 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Return of the Double Feature, a series programmed by Film Forum's Bruce Goldstein, opens on Friday and runs through September 13 in New York. Saturday sees a double bill of works by Jean-Luc Godard, Breathless, "a singularly penetrating film noir that still jars after more than 50 years," as Jonathan Stevenson puts it. "In counterpoint, Contempt embraces domestic life, but it is scarcely less fraught and Godard is as merciless as ever." More goings on: A new restoration of Louis Malle’s debut film, Elevator to the Gallows, tours the country. Dennis Lim will be introducing and discussing films by David Lynch in Berkeley. The Austin Film Society's presenting new restorations of King Hu's A Touch of Zen and Dragon Inn. And Mubi's Daniel Kasman has curated a series of films by Hong Sang-soo for Sydney's Museum of Contemporary Art. » - David Hudson »

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A Touch of Zen

2 August 2016 4:04 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

A Taiwanese wuxia masterpiece from director King Hu: three hours of suspense, visual beauty and amazing action scenes. A beautiful mystery woman captivates an artist-scholar. He who happily becomes her strategist in a battle to hold off an army... partly with ghost illusions. A Touch of Zen Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 825 1971 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 180 min. / Xia nü / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date July 19, 2016 / 39.95 Starring Hsu Feng, Shih Chun, Bai Ying, Xue Han, Zhang Bing-yu, Cao Jian, Jia Lu-shi. Cinematography Hua Hul-ying Film Editor King Hu Original Music Wu Da-jiang Based on a story from Strange Stories from a Chinese Studio by Pu Song-ling Presented by Sha-Yung-fong Written and Directed by King Hu

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

What I know about Asian cinema can be carried inside a thimble, and the very few pictures I've reviewed, such as the intriguing The Cave of Silken Web are »

- Glenn Erickson

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New Faces of Independent Film, Abel Gance’s ‘Napoleon’ Restored, Mel Gibson’s Action, and More

28 July 2016 2:27 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Dailies is a round-up of essential film writing, news bits, videos, and other highlights from across the Internet. If you’d like to submit a piece for consideration, get in touch with us in the comments below or on Twitter at @TheFilmStage.

Filmmaker Magazine has published their annual 25 New Faces of Independent Film, featuring Sasha Lane, Macon Blair, Connor Jessup, and more.

Watch a clip from the restoration of Abel Gance‘s Napoleon:

Mubi‘s Michael Pattison on Don Hertzfeldt’s It’s Such a Beautiful Day, our favorite animation of the century so far:

Psycholinguists call the opening gag of It’s Such a Beautiful Day (2012), Don Hertzfeldt’s delightful hour-long feature, a blend. Bill, a black-on-white stick figure whose only distinctive feature is his top hat, is on his way to the bus stop when he sees someone he recognizes but whose name he doesn’t remember. »

- The Film Stage

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Venice 2016. Lineup

28 July 2016 7:13 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The selection for the 2016 Venice Film Festival has been announced, with new films by Terrence Malick, Pablo Larraín, Lav Diaz, Wang Bing, Amat Escalante, Tom Ford, and more.COMPETITIONVoyage of TimeThe Bad Batch (Ana Lily Amirpour)Une vie i (Stéphane Brizé)La La Land (Damien Chazelle)The Light Between Oceans (Derek Cianfrance)El ciudadano ilustre (Mariano Cohn, Gastón Duprat)Spira Mirabilis (Massimo D'Anolfi, Martina Parenti)The Woman Who Left (Lav Diaz)La región salvaje (Amat Escalante)Nocturnal Animals (Tom Ford)Piuma (Roan Johnson)Paradise (Andrei Konchalovsky)Brimstone (Martin Koolhoven)Jackie (Pablo Larraín)Voyage of Time (Terrence Malick)El Cristo Ciego (Christopher Murray)Frantz (François Ozon)Questi Giorni (Giuseppe Piccioni)Arrival (Denis Villeneuve)Les beaux jours D'Aranjuez (Wim Wenders)Out Of COMPETITIONSafariOur War (Bruno Chiaravolloti, Claudio Jampaglia, Benedetta Argentieri)I Called Him Morgan (Kasper Collin)One More Time with Feeling (Andrew Dominik)The Bleeder (Philippe Falardeau)The Magnificent Seven (Antoine Fuqua »

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Weekly Rushes. Festival Lineups, King Hu's "Zen," 25 Indie Faces, Fascist Westerns

27 July 2016 7:42 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

NEWSPortoThe late summer film festival lineups are starting to be unveiled. Toronto, partially announced, already looks massive (highlights include new films directed by Kiyoshi Kurosawa, Jonathan Demme, and, yes, Nick Cannon), San Sebastien has announced the 14 films in its New Directors competition, including Notebook contributor Gabe Klinger's sophomore film Porto, and the Venice Days unofficial sidebar of the Venice Film Festival has its full lineup online.Speaking of lists, Filmmaker Magazine has picked its "twenty five new faces of independent film."A petition has been posted online to save the historic Rko studio globe in Hollywood.Recommended READINGThe Criterion Collection has posted King Hu's notes made for the Cannes Film Festival screening of his prize-winning wuxia classic, A Touch of Zen:But when I started working on the scenario, I discovered that translating the concept of Zen into cinematic terms posed a great many difficulties. Not long afterward, I »

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Venice 2016 Classics line-up unveiled

25 July 2016 4:58 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Titles this year range from Kurosawa’s Seven Samurai to John Landis’s An American Werewolf In London.

The selection of restored titles screening at this year’s Venice Film Festival (Aug 31 - Sept 10) have been revealed.

Italian director Roberto Andò (The Confessions) will oversee the strand’s jury of cinema history students which will award two prizes: Best Restored Film and Best Documentary On Cinema (the line-up of the latter will be revealed at a later date).

Now in its fifth year, this year’s selection includes Kurosawa’s Seven Samurai, Woody Allen’s Manhattan, John Landis’s An American Werewolf In London, Andrei Tarkovsky’s Stalker, and George A Romero’s Dawn Of The Dead amongst a host of other restorations.

The full Venice Film Festival line-up will be revealed on Thursday (July 28).

Venice Classics 2016 line-up:

1848, Dino Risi (Italy, 1948, 11’, B/W)

restored by: Archivio Nazionale Cinema Impresa-csc-Cineteca Nazionale and Veneranda Fabbrica del Duomo di Milano »

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New to Streaming: ‘The Childhood of a Leader,’ ‘Keanu,’ ‘A Touch of Zen,’ ‘Miles Ahead,’ and More

22 July 2016 6:23 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit the interwebs. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

April and the Extraordinary World (Christian Desmares and Franck Ekinci)

Most writing on Christian Desmares and Franck Ekinci‘s April and the Extraordinary World speaks as though they’ve adapted one of revered Frenchman Jacques Tardi‘s graphic novels. This isn’t quite the case. What they’ve actually done is bring his unique “universe” to life with help from previous collaborator Benjamin Legrand (writer of »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Sing Street,’ ‘A Touch of Zen,’ ‘To Have and Have Not,’ and More

19 July 2016 8:51 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Night & Fog (Alain Resnais)

Ten years after the liberation of the Nazi concentration camps, filmmaker Alain Resnais documented the abandoned grounds of Auschwitz and Majdanek in Night and Fog (Nuit et brouillard), one of the first cinematic reflections on the Holocaust. Juxtaposing the stillness of the abandoned camps’ empty buildings with haunting wartime footage, Resnais investigates humanity’s capacity for violence, and presents the devastating suggestion that such horrors could occur again. – Criterion

Sing Street (John Carney)

Returning »

- The Film Stage

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Blu-ray Review: A Touch Of Zen Comes to the Criterion Collection

18 July 2016 8:00 AM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Halfway through a year already crammed full of impressive releases (with no sign of slowing down... Dekalog for September!), The Criterion Collection has also taken advantage of the recent 4K remaster of King Hu's seminal A Touch of Zen, adding it to their collection on Blu-ray as spine #825. Our own James Marsh had a good long look at the good long Zen -- at 3 hours, its running time was so prohibitive that distributors originally chopped it into two films -- a few months ago when it was released in a limited edition by Masters of Cinema - you can find his comments here, along with an extensive review of the film. For those unfamiliar, though, A Touch of Zen follows a somewhat nerdy...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...] »

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DVD Review: The Assassin

23 May 2016 11:58 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★★ Hou Hsiao-Hsien's The Assassin is not quite like other wuxia movies. It shares a reverie in the natural world with King Hu's A Touch of Zen and the turmoil between love and duty of Ang Lee's genre-rejuvenating Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, but it transcends both. Where Hu leant on religious allegory, Hou's spirituality is deeply humanistic; where Lee used his canvas for epic fairytale legend, Hou employs his to craft folkloric vignettes of painterly beauty. Where the genre itself glides over rooftops and bounds into trees in glorious action spectacle, The Assassin uses violence in precise doses, instead submitting to the awesome power of stillness and tranquillity. Hou's camera lingers on a silk curtain blowing in the breeze without needing a blade to shear it in two. While this might deter some audiences, those who persevere will find a sumptuous film of extraordinary grace and irresistible potency.

»

- CineVue UK

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NYC Weekend Watch: Amy Heckerling, J.G. Ballard, Noël Coward & More

12 May 2016 6:28 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Spend “A Weekend with Amy Heckerling” when Johnny Dangerously and Fast Times at Ridgemont High screen this Saturday, while Look Who’s Talking and Clueless show on Sunday. All are on 35mm.

For “Welcome to Metrograph: A-z,” see a print of Philippe Garrel‘s The Inner Scar on Friday and Sunday; André de Toth‘s »

- Nick Newman

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Daily | Goings On | Brooks, Yamamoto, Welles

5 May 2016 8:42 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

In today's roundup on special screenings, we're collecting reviews of Richard Brooks's Looking for Mr. Goodbar, Eiichi Yamamoto's Belladonna of Sadness, King Hu's Dragon Inn, Tony Conrad's The Flicker, David Cronenberg's Dead Ringers and Riley Stearns's Faults. Plus: Celebrating Orson Welles in Los Angeles, talking with Kelly Reichardt in Vienna, Whit Stillman in Liverpool, discussing The Walking Dead in London, and in Gent, Pere Portabella's Informe General and Informe General II. El nuevo rapto de Europa. » - David Hudson »

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Terrence Malick’s City Symphony, ‘Phoenix’ Talk, Sounds of ‘The Force Awakens,’ and More

27 April 2016 12:44 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Dailies is a round-up of essential film writing, news bits, videos, and other highlights from across the Internet. If you’d like to submit a piece for consideration, get in touch with us in the comments below or on Twitter at @TheFilmStage.

Watch a video reframing Terrence Malick‘s Knight of Cups as a city symphony:

Electrician Bob Tanswell remembers working with Stanley Kubrick on The Shining at The Guardian:

I’d heard of Stanley Kubrick but didn’t realise how special he was. He’d do 150 takes of a simple scene. He knew everybody’s job. If he asked you a question and you didn’t know the answer, you really got it – not me so much, because I was just a spark. After having a go at someone he’d be walking away and give you a wink, like: “See that? That’s got him going.” He was »

- TFS Staff

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Daily | Goings On | Fassbinder, Hu, Ospina

22 April 2016 11:36 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

The Metrograph is screening all ten of Rainer Werner Fassbinder's favorite films: Nicholas Ray's Johnny Guitar, Howard Hawks's Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Charles Laughton's The Night of the Hunter, Vasily Shukshin's The Red Snowball Tree, Josef von Sternberg's Dishonored, Max Ophuls's Lola Montes, Michael Curtiz's Flamingo Road, Pier Paolo Pasolini's Salò, or The 120 Days of Sodom, Raoul Walsh's The Naked and the Dead and Luchino Visconti's The Damned. Also in New York: King Hu’s A Touch of Zen and work by Luis Ospina. Screening tonight in Chicago: Nathan Silver's Riot, Mike Ott's Lancaster, CA and William Greaves's In the Company of Men. And we have a few more goings on. » - David Hudson »

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NYC Weekend Watch: Fassbinder Favorites, Buñuel, Queer Cinema, King Hu & More

22 April 2016 8:59 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

You’ve read of Rainer Werner Fassbinder‘s ten favorite films — now you can see them. The German titan’s beloved titles are celebrated in a new series: Johnny Guitar screens this Friday; Saturday offers Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, The Night of the Hunter, and the rarely seen The Red Snowball Tree; on Sunday, one can »

- Nick Newman

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"A Touch of Zen": King Hu’s Masterful Concoction of Cinematic Flavors

21 April 2016 10:07 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Widely and rightly regarded as not only one of the finest martial arts films ever made, but one of the greatest works in of all Chinese cinema, King Hu’s A Touch of Zen (Xia nü, 1971) is most often lauded for its extraordinary fight sequences. Why the film is so exceptional, however, is that as great as these fight scenes are (and they are spectacular), they may not even be the best part of the movie. With 180 minutes to work with in its complete uncut version, which will screen in a new 4K restoration at Film Forum April 22 through May 5, Hu launches A Touch of Zen above most of its genre, above even his own impressive output, amplifying the essentials of the martial arts film while infusing it with other cinematic ingredients. The first shot of A Touch of Zen is of a spider moving in on its cobweb-entangled prey. »

- Jeremy Carr

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Weekly Rushes. 20 April 2016

20 April 2016 6:42 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

 Rushes collects news, articles, images, videos and more for a weekly roundup of essential items from the world of film.NEWSOf course, the biggest news in the film world over the last week has been the repeated announcements of the films included in the various festivals in Cannes this May, from the Official Selection (films by Almodóvar, Maren Ade, the Dardennes, Paul Verhoeven, and Sean Penn) and the Directors' Fortnight (Paul Schrader, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Marco Bellocchio), to Critics' Week (Oliver Laxe and Chloë Sevigny) and the increasingly higher profile Acid (including Damien Manivel's follow-up to A Young Poet, which is currently playing exclusively on Mubi in the Us).Speaking of festivals, many South Korean filmmakers will be boycotting the major Asian festival of Busan, due to interference with the organization from the city government.On a lighter note, the Loch Ness Monster has been found! Actually, no: that's no monster, »

- Notebook

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Criterion In July: From The In-laws To A Touch Of Zen And More

19 April 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Ah, Criterion! I love it when the company expands the parameters of what many people consider to be "classic cinema" and anoints the likes of The In-Laws, the 1979 comedy that remains a personal favorite. It may be very broad and very American, but it's also a quite inspired mixture of physical comedy, clever wisecracks, and great performances by Peter Falk and Alan Arkin. It also features a sparkling original screenplay by Andrew Bergman. Criterion's release schedule for July 2016 also includes the 1962 version of Carnival of Souls, two from Alain Resnais (Muriel, or The Time of Return and Night and Fog), King Hu's A Touch of Zen (a wonderfully fluid and dazzling martial arts classic) and Terrence Malick's dreamy The New World. Here's...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

»

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Movie Poster of the Week: “A Touch of Zen” and “Dragon Inn”

18 April 2016 8:38 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

These gorgeous posters—a Movie Poster of the Week exclusive premiere—for King Hu’s A Touch of Zen (1971) and Dragon Inn (1967) were drawn by comic book artist Greg Ruth. Hu’s wuxia masterpieces have been digitally restored and will soon be re-released by Janus Films, with A Touch of Zen opening at Film Forum next Friday and Dragon Inn opening at the Film Society of Lincoln Center on May 6. Ruth is a prolific and talented graphic artist, best known for his books Freaks of the Heartland and The Lost Boy, who has most recently collaborated with Ethan Hawke on Indeh, a graphic novel about the Apache wars. He has made a few movie poster screen prints in the past—for Breakfast at Tiffany’s, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and The Godfather II and is in the middle of Visible/Invisible, a series of limited-edition, large format »

- Adrian Curry

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Explore China of the Past and Present In Trailers for Films from King Hu and Wang Bing

13 April 2016 11:48 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

It would require two big restorations and come down to a limited, roll-out release of three films in total, but we might have a fine summer of Chinese cinema ahead of us. Janus Films have restored King Hu‘s legendary wuxia pictures A Touch of Zen and Dragon Inn — which, based on these first previews, have been given treatments that warrant the ticket price. (The former begins playing at Film Forum on April 22 and the latter starts its run at the Film Society of Lincoln Center on May 6 before expanding.) I’m sure the inevitable Criterion releases will do well for those who can’t make it, however.

On the somewhat heavier side is Wang Bing‘s four-hour ‘Til Madness Do Us Part, a documentary set within “an isolated mental institution in rural Zhaotong,” and whose very complimentary reviews have brought up comparisons to Titicut Follies and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Next. »

- Nick Newman

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 28 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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