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Feats of Decency: Close-Up on Jean Renoir's "Grand Illusion"

Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Grand Illusion (1937) is showing July 27 - August 26, 2017 in the United States as part of the retrospective Jean Renoir.Considering Jean Renoir's Grand Illusion today in no small part involves an awareness of status and stature, the most prominent (or maybe just the most intimidating) aspect of which surely being the cherished status the film continues to enjoy in the canon of film history. To this day, it remains a singular achievement, not only as one of Renoir's foundational masterpieces, but also as a film of its time whose contents have remained timeless. Released in 1937 to great acclaim, it bid farewell to one era of European history and warfare as another, far darker one was about to begin; thus, more than the grimly comical The Rules of the Game (made and released two years closer to the brink
See full article at MUBI »

A 'Star Wars' Firing and the Death of the Director

A 'Star Wars' Firing and the Death of the Director
On January 14, 1933, Hollywood astrologer Paul Branchard predicted an annus mirabilis for his gifted if mercurial client, Erich von Stroheim.

“The Sun is slowly (by progression) pulling in to parallel to the birth position of Neptune, and will become manifest in about two years,” he wrote, as quoted by Richard Koszarski in his biography The Man You Loved to Hate: Erich von Stroheim and Hollywood. “In my thirty years of study and practice with this science, I do not recall having ever seen so many fortunate influences, all operating at one time in a horoscope.”

Branchard may have had 30...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

All of the Films Joining Filmstruck’s Criterion Channel This July

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This July will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Saturday, July 1 Changing Faces

What does a face tell us even when it’s disguised or disfigured? And what does it conceal? Guest curator Imogen Sara Smith, a critic and author of the book In Lonely Places: Film Noir Beyond the City, assembles a series of films that revolve around enigmatic faces transformed by masks, scars, and surgery, including Georges Franju’s Eyes Without a Face (1960) and Hiroshi Teshigahara’s The Face of Another (1966).

Tuesday, July 4 Tuesday’s Short + Feature: Premature* and Ten*

Come hitch a ride with Norwegian director Gunhild Enger and the late Iranian master
See full article at CriterionCast »

"Twin Peaks," Episode 6 Recap: Make Sense of It

Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.A man walks into a bar—after cursing out Gene Kelly (because most of the time we don't feel like singin' in the rain). The bar, by the way, is named "Max Von's," surely after Erich von Stroheim's rabidly devoted butler Max von Mayerling from Sunset Blvd (1950). Of his employer, silent-film diva Norma Desmond (Gloria Swanson), Max once said, "Madame is the greatest star of them all." No more proper locale, then, for a star entrance: "Diane," says FBI forensics specialist Albert Rosenfield (Miguel Ferrer) to a platinum blond beauty nursing martini and cigarette. Around turns Diane Evans, the heretofore unseen confidante of FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan), and played (of course, how could there be any doubt?) by Laura Dern.
See full article at MUBI »

Christopher Nolan Curates BFI Series on the Influences of ‘Dunkirk’

“I spent a lot of time reviewing the silent films for crowd scenes –the way extras move, evolve, how the space is staged and how the cameras capture it, the views used,” Nolan said earlier this year when it came to the creation of his WWII epic Dunkirk, referencing films such as Intolerance, Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans, and Greed, as well as the films of Robert Bresson.

Throughout the entire month of July, if you’re in the U.K., you are lucky enough to witness a selection of these influences in a program at BFI Southbank. Featuring all screenings in 35mm or 70mm — including a preview of Dunkirk over a week before it hits theaters — there’s classics such as Greed, Sunrise, and The Wages of Fear, as well as Alien, Speed, and even Tony Scott’s final film.

Check out Nolan’s introduction below, followed by
See full article at The Film Stage »

Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk To Play At BFI Southbank On July 13

Running from 1-31 July, BFI Southbank are delighted to present a season of films which have inspired director Christopher Nolan’s new feature Dunkirk (2017), released in cinemas across the UK on Friday 21 July.

Christopher Nolan Presents has been personally curated by the award-winning director and will offer audiences unique insight into the films which influenced his hotly anticipated take on one of the key moments of WWII.

The season will include a special preview screening of Dunkirk on Thursday 13 July, which will be presented in 70mm and include an introduction from the director himself.

Christopher Nolan is a passionate advocate for the importance of seeing films projected on film, and as one of the few cinemas in the UK that still shows a vast amount of celluloid film, BFI Southbank will screen all the films in the season on 35mm or 70mm.

In 2015 Nolan appeared on stage alongside visual artist
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Au Bonheur Des Dames (The Ladies’ Paradise) May 6th at St. Louis Art Museum – Live Music by The Poor People of Paris

The silent French film Au Bonheur Des Dames (1930 – aka Ladies’ Paradise) screens Saturday May 6th at 11am at The St. Louis Art Museum (Forest Park, 1 Fine Arts Dr, St. Louis, Mo). The film will be accompanied by Elsie Parker and The Poor People of Paris. Tickets for this event are $15 general admission and $10 for museum members. Tickets can be purchased in advance from Metrotix or by calling 314.534.1111.

Julien Duvivier’s final silent film is a modern retelling of Emile Zola’s panoramic chronicle of mid-19th-century Parisian society, centering on a small fabric shop struggling to survive in the shadow of a luxury department store. With expressionistic shades of Erich von Stroheim and G.W. Pabst, the film captures the rhythms of urban life and creates a stinging portrait of capitalist ruthlessness, class tensions, and sexual competition. Scott Foundas in the Village Voice calls the film “an orgy of pure cinema,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Sunset Boulevard Screens April 26th at The Tivoli – ‘Classics in the Loop’

“They took the idols and smashed them, the Fairbankses, the Gilberts, the Valentinos! And who’ve we got now? Some nobodies!”

Sunset Boulevard screens Wednesday April 26th at The Tivoli Theater (6350 Delmar in ‘The Loop’) as part of their new ‘Classics in the Loop’ Crime & Noir film series. The movie starts at 7pm and admission is $7. It will be on The Tivoli’s big screen.

Billy Wilder is widely considered as one of the most decorated directors of the golden black and white era with movies such as Some Like It Hot, The Apartment, Double Indemnity, etc., but Sunset Boulevard may be his darkest. The movie starts with a man lying dead in a swimming pool of a huge villa located in Sunset Boulevard, a prime location in Hollywood where movie stars dwell. The viewers are then taken into flashback explaining the events that led to his death. The flashback
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Review: Song To Song, Where Angelic White People Have A Devil Of A Time

And so the prostitute says, "Create the Illusion, but don't believe it."  I am not sure if that is Terrence Malick's thesis with Song To Song, an elliptical fairy tale of despondency, but the film does feature Val Kilmer wielding a chainsaw on stage at the SXSW music festival, so there is that. It also embeds clips from Eric Von Stroheim's Greed, offers heartbreaking relationship advice from punk rock goddess Patti Smith, cheerfully cuts off Iggy Pop in mid-sentence and makes a little time for Natalie Portman to wait tables and attend church services kitted out in Erin Brockovich inspired push-up bras. Song to Song is Malick's fifth film in six years, not including his forthcoming Europe-set WWII epic, to be released later in 2017. Apparently,...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

‘Classics In The Loop’ – Wednesday Night ‘Classic Crime & Noir’ Film Series at The Tivoli Begins April 5th

There’s nothing more fun than getting to watch classic movies the way they were intended–on the big screen!

Now, I understand plenty of people don’t want to go to a theater, spend a fortune on tickets, popcorn, and a drink just to see the glow of cell phones and hear people rudely talking while someone kicks your seat from behind, but that’s not the experience you’ll get at Landmark theaters affordable ‘Crime & Noir’ film series. St. Louis movie buffs are in for a treat as Landmark’s The Tivoli Theater will return with it’s ‘Classics on the Loop’ every Wednesday beginning April 5th at 7pm. This season, the Tivoli will screen, on their big screen (which seats 320 btw), eight crime and noir masterpiece that need to be seen in a theater with an audience. Admission is only $7.

One benefits of the big screen is
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Cinema St. Louis’ Classic French Film Festival Kicks Off Friday with Au Revoir Les Enfants

The Ninth Annual Robert Classic French Film Festival — co-presented by Cinema St. Louis and the Webster University Film Series starts this Friday, March 10th. — The Classic French Film Festival celebrates St. Louis’ Gallic heritage and France’s cinematic legacy. The featured films span the decades from the 1920s through the mid-1990s, offering a revealing overview of French cinema.

All films are screened at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood).

The fest is annually highlighted by significant restorations, which this year includes films by two New Wave masters: Jacques Rivette’s first feature, “Paris Belongs to Us,” and François Truffaut’s cinephilic love letter, “Day for Night.” The fest also provides one of the few opportunities available in St. Louis to see films projected the old-school, time-honored way, with both Alain Resnais’ “Last Year at Marienbad” and Robert Bresson’s “Au hasard Balthazar” screening from 35mm prints. Even more traditional,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Process of Cinematic Re-Evaluation Explored in New Video Essay

As this year’s awards season comes to an end this weekend, if history has proven anything, it’s that one must not judge a film’s legacy by the amount of trophies or box-office it receives. In fact, it’s often quite the contrary: as the years go on, under-appreciated (or even initially mis-understood) films start to find an audience and are prime for a re-evaluation. A new video essay explores this process, primarily through three paramount examples, and how time is perhaps the only thing that matters.

Coming from Andrew Saladino’s The Royal Ocean Film Society, the five-minute video essay The Story of the Re-Evaluated is a brief overview of this, showing the initial reception of Michael Cimino‘s ambitious flop Heaven’s Gate, Michael Powell‘s dark character study Peeping Tom, and Eric von Stroheim‘s studio-mangled Greed, and how these films have been re-embraced.

In the end,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Cinema St. Louis’ Classic French Film Festival March 10th -26th at Webster University

The Ninth Annual Robert Classic French Film Festival — co-presented by Cinema St. Louis and the Webster University Film Series — celebrates St. Louis’ Gallic heritage and France’s cinematic legacy. The featured films span the decades from the 1920s through the mid-1990s, offering a revealing overview of French cinema.

The fest is annually highlighted by significant restorations, which this year includes films by two New Wave masters: Jacques Rivette’s first feature, “Paris Belongs to Us,” and François Truffaut’s cinephilic love letter, “Day for Night.” The fest also provides one of the few opportunities available in St. Louis to see films projected the old-school, time-honored way, with both Alain Resnais’ “Last Year at Marienbad” and Robert Bresson’s “Au hasard Balthazar” screening from 35mm prints. Even more traditional, we also offer a silent film with live music, and audiences are sure to delight in the Poor People of Paris
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Second Opinion – Sing (2016)

Sing, 2016.

Directed by Garth Jennings.

Featuring the voice talents of Matthew McConaughey, Reese Witherspoon, Scarlett Johansson, Seth MacFarlane, Taron Egerton, Peter Serafinowicz, Tori Kelly, Garth Jennings, Rhea Perlman, Nick Kroll, John C. Reilly, Jennifer Saunders, Nick Offerman, Leslie Jones, and Adam Buxton.

Synopsis:

Koala bear Buster Moon (the voice of Matthew McConaughey) is easily the least successful impresario in the theatre world. All his shows flop and, staring bankruptcy in the face, he decides to launch a singing contest. One that attracts a long queue of hopefuls, including a crooning mouse, a heavy metal skunk, a shy singing elephant and a narcissistic pig. But who will win the $100,000 prize?

With Gru and his Minions due to return this summer in Despicable Me 3, Illumination is plugging the gap with new animation, Sing, which borrows heavily from the unlikely combination of Disney and X-Factor.

In a city populated entirely by animals, loveable
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Sliff 2016: Tribute to King Kong Nov. 6th – Here’s a Retrospective on the 1933 Original

A Tribute to King Kong takes place as part of the The St. Louis International Film Festival Sunday, Nov. 6 beginning at 6:00pm at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium. The first film screened will be the new documentary Long Live The King, which explores the enduring fascination with one of the biggest stars — both literally and figuratively — in Hollywood history: the mighty King Kong. Produced and directed by Frank Dietz and Trish Geiger, the creative team behind the award-winning “Beast Wishes,” the documentary devotes primary attention to the 1933 classic, celebrating the contributions of filmmakers Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack, stars Fay Wray, Robert Armstrong, and Bruce Cabot, writer Edgar Wallace, and especially stop-motion innovator Willis O’Brien. But Kong’s legacy is also fully detailed: the sequel “Son of Kong,” the cinematic kin “Mighty Joe Young,” the Dino DeLaurentis and Peter Jackson remakes, even the Japanese versions by Toho Studios.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

French Director Cyril Morin Recreates New York 1984 with Love and Sadness

French Director Cyril Morin Recreates New York 1984 with Love and Sadness
NY84” will have a gala opening and theatrical release this October 14 at the Arena Theater in Hollywood.

A unique venue for a unique film written and directed by Cyril Morin and starring Sam Quartin, Chris Schellenger and Davy J. Marr, “NY84” follows the adventures of three young artists in the downtown New York art scene in the early 1980s. Young and carefree, Kate, Anton, and Keith party, photograph, paint, sing, and play their way through the clubs and lofts of Alphabet City.

The party ends in 1984 when Anton and Keith contract a mysterious illness known as the “gay cancer.” We gain an intimate glimpse into their creative and emotional lives as the three lose their youth and innocence.

Cyril Morin

This is a lyrical poetic paen to those times some of us were lucky enough to have lived through. The sexual revolution and its sexual freedom in effect then for the newly liberated homosexual community, also opened the way for Kate to express herself. And it opened a door for transexuals, women and the whole diversity of humanity to assert itself today.
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

The Human Condition

Want a nine-hour dose of the truth of existence so harrowing that it will make you feel grateful no matter how humble your situation? Masaki Kobayshi's epic of the real cost of war boggles the mind with its creeping revelations of cosmic bleakness. Yet all the way through you know you're experiencing a truth far beyond slogans and sentiments. The Human Condition Region B Blu-ray Arrow Academy (UK) 1959-61 / B&W / 2:35 anamorphic widescreen / 574 min. / Ningen no jôken / Street Date September 19, 2016 / Available from Amazon UK £ 39.99 Starring Tatsuya Nakadai, Michiyo Aratama, Chikage Awashima, Ineko Arima, Keiji Sada, So Yamamura, Kunie Tanaka, Kei Sato, Chishu Ryu, Taketoshi Naito. Cinematography Yoshio Miyajima Art Direction Kazue Hirataka <Film Editor Keiichi Uraoka Original Music Chuji Kinoshita Written by Zenzo Matsuyama, Masaki Kobayashi from the novel by Jumpei Gomikawa Produced by Shigeru Wakatsuki Directed by Masaki Kobayashi

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

The first Blu-ray of perhaps
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

9 genre movies with scenes which may be lost forever

Ryan Lambie Aug 9, 2016

From 2001 and Metropolis, to The Wicker Man and Event Horizon: a look at nine films with scenes we may never see...

There are some movies whose images and ideas are so indelible, it's difficult to imagine a world without them. Yet films are by their nature delicate things; they're the end-product of months or even years of craftsmanship, and whether they're stored on celluloid or captured digitally, they're as vulnerable to the ravages of time or acts of god as any other artform.

Cinema history is littered with stories of lost and damaged movies. Back in the 1920s, eminent director Erich von Stroheim made Greed, an expensive, nine-and-a-half hour epic that was repeatedly cut until only 140 minutes of its original footage remained. Legend has it that a janitor accidentally threw out the removed footage and, just like that, years of work were gone - seemingly forever.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Perfect pitch by Anne-Katrin Titze

Xavier Giannoli: "The importance of Billy Wilder for me was tenderness and cruelty." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

My conversation with the Marguerite director ranged from Erik Satie's food habits, Salieri in Milos Forman's Amadeus, tribute to Jean Renoir's The Rules Of The Game, John Huston's The Man Who Would Be King, Erich von Stroheim in Sunset Boulevard, Robert Redford in Sydney Pollack's Out Of Africa and Karen Blixen, Meryl Streep in Stephen Frears' Florence Foster Jenkins, Woody Allen's Broadway Danny Rose, Danny Kaye and the Carnegie Deli, Charlie Chaplin, Tristan Tzara to Margaret Dumont and the Marx Brothers.

Catherine Frot as Marguerite: "It's the story of a woman who needs love."

When I brought up Michael Shannon and Jeff Nichols' latest film, Midnight Special (after Shotgun Stories and Take Shelter and Mud), Xavier Giannoli said that in Paris there are posters
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

[Review] Marguerite

Though she was popular nearly a century ago, Florence Foster Jenkins feels particularly relevant to modern art’s ongoing dialogue with awfulness as a version of the sublime. In another world, Xavier Giannoli’s prickly tragicomedy Marguerite could easily be an exercise in self-loathing in the same fashion as Rick Alverson’s films, but instead it’s a film whose virtues lies in a fierce neutrality towards its own subject. Even the characters who appear to be the most transparently kind or evil contain multitudes, and the film becomes a constant examination of its own tone.

As such, Marguerite is frantic and compellingly unpredictable, even as it heads into comfortable territory. Loosely based on the life of Jenkins, a ’20s-era socialite and Opera singer renowned for her supernaturally abhorrent voice (here’s a recording of her murdering every poor note of Mozart’s Der Hölle Rache), Marguerite follows Marguerite Dumont
See full article at The Film Stage »
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