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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005

21-40 of 50 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Jean-Marc Vallée Still Tunes in Deep to 'Wild,' Strayed and Witherspoon (Exclusive Video)

6 September 2014 5:00 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

It isn't every day that a director is so identified with his subject that his eyes well up with tears. Something about Cheryl Strayed's redemption and rediscovery hit deep inside Montreal director Jean-Marc Vallée, 51, who understood the impact that the loss of a parent can have on anyone, man or woman. (He lost his own mother to cancer three years ago.)  Vallée is a naturalistic director (his favorites include Clint Eastwood, Steven Soderbergh and Jacques Audiard) who is not afraid of deep emotion, extreme behavior, long takes, digital cameras or natural light. "Dallas Buyer's Club" played Toronto last year and wound up in the Oscar race, winning acting Oscars for Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto. Will history repeat with Reese Witherspoon, who persuaded Strayed to give her the movie rights to her 74-week New York Times bestseller, and hoisted a 75-pound pack ("the monster") as the writer did, hiking in »

- Anne Thompson

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Adele Haenel, Anais Demoustier and Reda Kateb Among Unifrance’s 10 Talents To Watch

25 August 2014 1:43 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Paris– Adele Haenel (“Love at First Fight”), Anais Demoustier (“The New Girlfriend”) and Reda Kateb (“Lost River”) are among the 10 Talents to Watch selected by Unifrance, the French film promotion org.

The other actors and directors selected by Unifrance are actors Raphael Personnaz, Celine Salette, Gaspard Ulliel and four femmes directors Celine Sciamma, Mia Hansen-Love, and Alix Delaporte and Melanie Laurent, who is also a popular actress.

Haenel, who delivered a breakthrough performance in Katell Quillevere’s “Suzanne,”  showed her range in  Thomas Cailley’s “Love at First Fight” (“Les Combattants”), in which she played the lead actress. A fresh romantic dramedy set in an Army survival program, “Love at First Fight” proved to be Directors’ Fortnight hit, winning a record four awards.

Haenel also starred in Andre Techine’s “French Riviera” which played at Cannes in the official selection.

Demoustier made her debut at age 13 in Michael Haneke’s »

- Elsa Keslassy

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L'Etrange Festival fetes Audiard, Sion

15 August 2014 6:02 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Jacques Audiard, Sono Sion and Godfrey Reggio select films for cult festival.

The 20th edition of cult Paris film festival L’Etrange Festival (Sept 4 - 14) will feature films including The Voices by Marjane Satrapi, Let Us Prey by Brian O’Malley, The Tribe by Myroslav Slaboshpytskiy and Wetlands by David Wnendt.

Asian titles include The World of Kanako by Tetsuya Nakashima, which gets its European premiere and will close the festival, Tokyo Tribe by Sono Sion, Moebius by Kim Ki-Duk and Over Your Dead Body by Takashi Miike.

Directors honoured by the festival include Jacques Audiard, Sono Sion and Godfrey Reggio, who have each programmed five films for the event, which will screen 80 films in total across 11 days.

Founder and festival director Frédéric Temps said: “We strive to show works that defy conventions and that challenges the expectations and definitions of their genres.”

The event takes place at Paris’ Forum des Halles. »

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L'Etrange Festival fetes Audiard, Sion, Reggio

15 August 2014 6:02 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Jacques Audiard, Sono Sion and Godfrey Reggio select films for cult festival.

The 20th edition of cult Paris film festival L’Etrange Festival (Sept 4 - 14) will feature films including The voices by Marjane Satrapi, Let Us Prey by Brian O’Malley, The Tribe by Myroslav Slaboshpytskiy and Wetlands by David Wnendt.

Asian titles include closer The world of Kanako by Tetsuya Nakashima, which gets its European premiere, Tokyo tribe by Sono Sion, Moebius by Kim Ki-Duk and Over Your Dead Body by Takashi Miike.

Directors honoured by the festival include Jacques Audiard, Sono Sion and Godfrey Reggio, who have each programmed five films for the event, which will screen 80 films in total across eleven days.

Founder and festival director Frédéric Temps said of the festival: “We strive to show works that defy conventions and that challenges the expectations and definitions of their genres.”

The event takes place at Paris’ Forum des Halles. »

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20 Greatest Directors Of The New Millennium

18 July 2014 2:39 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Christopher Nolan

In the early 20th century, when the public’s love affair with cinema began, we were first introduced to this beguiling new art form through its stars, and this is exactly how the powers that be wanted it. When the Hollywood studios ran the film industry like a tightly controlled, upper-class bordello, the emphasis was placed on the faces you could see, the actors, and a films director existed in some theoretical dark corner of the silver screen, practicing some ethereal cinematic wizardry that the plebeian film fan could never even hope to understand. As the Hepburns’, Davis’, Borgarts’, and Gables’ of the world began to age though, and their box office power diminished, the studios were briefly forced to let the inmates run the prison, handing over the keys to the pesky directors. Suddenly, the auteur was born.

While technically speaking, Auteur Theory, the belief that a »

- Christopher Lominac

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Watch: Cotillard Seeks Help in Dardenne Brothers' Cannes Hit 'Two Days, One Night' (Trailer)

10 July 2014 7:06 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

The Belgian filmmakers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne have never made a bad movie. These painstaking writer-directors carefully prepare, rehearse for three weeks before filming, and always deliver something compelling and watchable. The Dardennes first approached Marion Cotillard when they were involved in producing Jacques Audiard's "Rust and Bone." As soon as they met her they knew they wanted to work with her, they said in Cannes. The feeling was mutual. A longtime admirer of the Dardennes, Cotillard signed on first for a story about a rural doctor and then a different script inspired by true stories from the economic crisis about a working class woman. The result is the stunning "Two Days, One Night" which failed to win a prize at Cannes (which has showered the Dardennes with prizes over the years). Watch the new trailer below.  Oscar-winner Cotillard ("La Vie en Rose") manages to fold herself into this everyday woman, »

- Anne Thompson

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Alexandre Desplat to head Venice jury

23 June 2014 5:11 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Award-winning composer will chair a jury that will award the Golden Lion for best feature at the 71st Venice Film Festival.

Alexandre Desplat, the internationally renowned French film composer whose credits include The King’s Speech and Argo, has been named president of the International Jury for the Competition section of the 71st Venice International Film Festival (Aug 27 to Sept 6).

It marks the first time a film composer has been chosen to chair Venice’s Competition jury, which will comprise nine members and award the Golden Lion for Best Film and other official prizes.  

Desplat is a six-time Oscar nominee (The Queen, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Fantastic Mr. Fox, The King’s Speech, Argo, and Philomena) and winner of a Golden Globe, three Césars, two European Film Awards, and a Bafta.

He has collaborated with directors such as Stephen Frears, Roman Polanski, Terrence Malick and Tom Hooper as well as Jacques Audiard, Kathryn Bigelow, [link »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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French Film Composer Alexandre Desplat To Head Venice Film Festival Jury

23 June 2014 4:17 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Rome – French film composer Alexandre Desplat will preside the main jury of the upcoming 71st Venice Film Festival, marking the first time a musician will head the panel of jurors that gives out the fest’s Golden Lion and other top prizes.

 

Desplat, a six-time Oscar nominee whose film scores include “Argo,” “The Queen,” “Fantastic Mr. Fox,” “The King’s Speech,” and “Philomena,” was praised by Venice artistic director Alberto Barbera as “not only one of the greatest composers of film scores today but an ardent cinephile, whose extraordinary artistic sensitivity is sustained by a profound knowledge of cinema, of its history, of its language.”

 

Desplat, whose many prizes include a Golden Globe, three Cesars, two European Film Awards, and a Bafta, has collaborated with scores of highly regarded helmers, including Roman Polanski, Terrence MalickJacques Audiard, Kathryn Bigelow, David Fincher, and Ang Lee.

“It is a great honour and »

- Nick Vivarelli

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'Crouching Tiger,' 'Howards End,' 'Talk to Her': the best of Sony Pictures Classics

16 June 2014 10:07 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Sony Pictures Classics honchos Michael Barker and Tom Bernard have been feted up one side and down the other lately. The duo celebrated 20 years of Spc in 2012 and have received awards from the Museum of the Moving Image and the Gotham Awards as of late. Tonight they will receive the Los Angeles Film Festival's Spirit of Independence Award as the love keeps pouring in. Given that we recently celebrated the 20th anniversary of Fox Searchlight — another crucial entity in the indie film space — it seemed like we were over due for a similar appreciation of Sony Classics' 22 years of output. The interesting thing, though, is that unlike Searchlight, there isn't necessarily anything outwardly identifiable about Sony Classics films as, well, "Sony Classics films." They all have a strong whiff of good taste but they don't have the heavy marketing footprint of some of the studio's contemporaries. Barker and Bernard's cinephile passion is always evident, »

- Gregory Ellwood, Guy Lodge, Kristopher Tapley

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Review: Emmanuelle Devos Shines in Biopic Violette

12 June 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

Ever since her breakout role as a deaf office worker, Carla, in Jacques Audiard's audacious caper flick Read My Lips, Emmanuelle Devos has risen to become one of the top French actresses of our time, working with auteur filmmakers such as Arnaud Desplechin and Alain Resnais and rubbing shoulders with Catherine Deneuve and Gerard Depardeu. The thing is, I can't think of another actress who made a career out of her frumpiness more successfully than Devos. And she happens to be a favorite of mine.In Martin Provost's biopic of a post-war French writer Violette Leduc, Devos delivers another gold-star performance, again using her arguably unremarkable physical attributes as a weapon.The film starts with Violette's black market smuggler days during WWII, when she is helplessly in...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

»

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Marion Cotillard Set To Topline Nicole Garcia’s ‘Mal de Pierres,’ Produced by Alain Attal (Exclusive)

10 June 2014 8:53 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Annecy– Marion Cotillard is set to topline “Mal de Pierres,” a period romance drama directed by critically-acclaimed auteur Nicole Garcia and produced by Alain Attal’s Les Productions du Tresor, one of France’s top independent film companies.

An adaptation of Milena Agus’ eponymous novel set after WWII, “Mal de Pierres” (“Mal di pietre”)  spans 20 years, following the destiny of a passionate, free-spirited woman who is in a loveless marriage and falls for another man.

A bestseller, the book has been translated in more than 15 languages.

Cotillard will play the leading role. Garcia co-wrote the script with her regular co-scribe, Jacques Fieschi.

“It’s a passion project for both Nicole and us,” Attal told Variety.” It’s a very romantic and intense story about a woman whose quest for absolute love is the essence of life, her ‘raison d’etre.’” Attal added that Cotillard was taken by the script, the »

- Elsa Keslassy

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Top Ten Most Exciting Directors Working Today

28 May 2014 9:44 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Quentin Tarantino, during his Cannes Film Festival press conference (watch it here), mentioned an email chain he was a part of where he and some friends discussed what they believed to be the ten most exciting directors working today. Among those listed he said only David Fincher and Richard Linklater where in everyone's top ten, he wasn't sure why Pedro Almodovar wasn't on everyone's list and he also qualified what he believed it meant for a director to be the "most exciting". Here's how he put it: "I think what that means is, you feel that their best work is still in front of them. That's what makes a filmmaker exciting, that's what makes you anticipate a new movie coming out. Because the new movie could be their best one. From this day on that will be the new barometer from which they're judged. We could be wrong, and their »

- Brad Brevet

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Rise of UKIP Poses Challenges for British Film and TV Folk

26 May 2014 9:24 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

London — The surge in support for the U.K. Independence Party — demonstrated at the European Union election last week — may have major consequences for the British film and TV industry.

UKIP, which advocates an exit from the European Union, took first place among British parties in the EU election, the results of which were just announced. It is the first time a party other than the Conservatives or Labor Party has come first in a national election for 100 years.

The Ukip vote surged 11% to nab 27.5% of the votes cast, compared with 25.4% for Labor, and 23.9% for the Conservatives, which forms part of the coalition government with the Liberal Democrats, whose support fell 6.87%, leaving it with just 6.87% of the vote.

There is a double threat to EU membership posed by the Ukip surge. First, if Ukip wins next May’s general election, then the U.K. will definitely leave the EU. Second, »

- Leo Barraclough

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Cannes: 'Winter Sleep' Wins the Palme d'Or, Full List of Awards (Updated)

24 May 2014 10:42 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Not surprisingly, critics' fave "Winter Sleep" directed by Nuri Bilge Ceylon, won the Cannes Palme D'Or Saturday. (Our review here.) Lead contenders were Mike Leigh's "Mr. Turner," starring Timothy Spall, who was the favorite to win Best Actor; Bennett Miller's "Foxcatcher," which won best director; the Dardennes' "Two Days, One Night," starring Best Actress contender Marion Cotillard, who was also overlooked for Jacques Audiard's "Rust & Bone." In an upset, Julianne Moore took home the prize for David Cronenberg's "Maps to the Stars," which was better received by the Europeans than the North American press. Also passed over was Anne Dorval, star of 25-year-old Xavier Dolan's "Mommy,"  which shared the jury prize with 83-year-old Jean-Luc Godard's "Goodbye to Language." Sony Pictures Classics' Michael Barker and Tom Bernard were happy, as they are releasing three of the award-winners, fest hits "Foxcatcher," "Mr. Turner" and "Leviathan, »

- Anne Thompson

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Cannes: Marion Cotillard Delivers for the Dardennes in 'Two Days, One Night'

20 May 2014 4:26 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

The Belgian filmmakers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne have never made a bad movie. These painstaking writer-directors carefully prepare, rehearse for three weeks before filming, and always deliver something compelling and watchable. And the Cannes juries have responded enthusiastically over the years, rewarding them Palme d'Or awards for their first competition entry "Rosetta" in 1999 and "L'Enfant" in 2005, Best Screenplay for "The Silence of Lorna (2008) and the Grand Prix for "The Kid with the Bike" (2011). This year, the most likely win for "Two Days, One Night" is Best Actress for Marion Cotillard, by far the biggest star to join a Dardennes film.  The Dardennes first approached Cotillard when they were involved in producing Jacques Audiard's "Rust and Bone." As soon as they met her they knew they wanted to work with her, they said in Cannes. The feeling was mutual. A longtime admirer of the Dardennes, Cotillard signed on first for »

- Anne Thompson

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Cannes: Apaches, Atresmedia Team for ‘Toro’ (Exclusive)

18 May 2014 12:41 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

“The Impossible” producer Apaches Ent. is teaming with Spain’s Atresmedia Cine (“I Want You,” “Red Lights”), Zircocine (“Operation-e”) and Escandalo Films (“Eva”) to produce “Toro,” which looks set to raise the bar of full-on upscale action thrillers coming out of Spain.

Sold by Film Factory at Cannes, “Toro” marks director Kike Maillo’s follow-up to “Eva,” Spain’s first robot movie that was sold widely by Wild Bunch, with the Weinstein Co acquiring U.S. rights.

Written by up-and-coming scribes Fernando Navarro (“Anacleto: Secret Agent”) and Rafael Cobos (“Unit 7,” “Marshland”) “Toro” stars two of Spain’s most popular actors, Mario Casas (“Unit 7”) and Luis Tosar (“Miami Vice.”) Claudia Vega (“Eva”) co-stars.

Billed as hyper-realistic, Maillo’s sophomore pic stars Mario Casas as Toro, an ex-con going straight until his brother, who owes money to the mob, embroils him a frenetic, violent and wild escape that endangers his and his niece’s lives. »

- John Hopewell

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Cannes Film Review: ‘Saint Laurent’

17 May 2014 4:57 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Even in a contemporary film culture where no idea seems too thin to try twice, the arrival of two Yves Saint Laurent biopics in the space of five months counts as a distinct curiosity: The enduring influence of the French fashion god, who died in 2008, is beyond question, but his life doesn’t seem an obvious source of fascination to the filmgoing public. Yet if Jalil Lespert’s bland, authorized “Yves Saint Laurent,” which bowed domestically in January, represents the pret-a-porter version of its subject, Bertrand Bonello’s glossily intuitive vision is pure haute couture — considerably more spectacular, but also less practical, with its baroque ornamentation and slip-sliding chronology. The result, while seductively silly and largely unmoving, does a better job than its predecessor of celebrating Saint Laurent’s flamboyant artistry.

With its bigger-name cast and audio-visual sparkle, “Saint Laurent” also seems the safer commercial bet for international distribs, effectively »

- Guy Lodge

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Marion Cotillard On Her Latest Cannes Film and Getting Over Edith Piaf

13 May 2014 5:00 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It is the voice — lilting, lightly French-accented — that one notices first, even before fully registering the famous face. You notice it because, in the movies, Marion Cotillard so rarely sounds like herself, whether affecting Edith Piaf’s nasal warble in her Oscar-winning performance in “La Vie en Rose,” the Polish dialect of the 1920s Ellis Island emigre in director James Gray’s “The Immigrant,” or her Belgian regional accent as a downsized factory worker in Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne’s “Two Days, One Night,” which premieres this week in competition at the

67th Cannes Film Festival.

If voice is one of an actor’s most valuable instruments, Cotillard plays hers like a first-chair virtuoso. Early in the shooting of “The Immigrant” (which debuts in the U.S. May 16), Gray asked Polish actress Maja Wampuszyc, who plays Cotillard’s aunt in the film, to evaluate the French actress’s command of Wampuszyc’s native language. »

- Scott Foundas

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Marion Cotillard on Learning a Whole New Language to Play a Polish Prostitute in ‘The Immigrant’

13 May 2014 8:13 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Marion Cotillard is never one to back down from a challenge. For her breakout, Oscar-winning role in "La Vie en Rose," the actress mastered Édith Piaf’s vocal delivery to believably portray the icon. A few years later, for Jacques Audiard's drama "Rust and Bone," Cotillard, a novice swimmer, learned to become a strong one in a matter of weeks in order to play a whale trainer. The challenge she set out for herself in James Gray's period drama "The Immigrant" trumps anything the actress has attempted before. For the film, which opens this Friday in select theaters, Cotillard had to learn a whole new language. As Ewa, the titular illegal Polish immigrant forced into prostitution by Joaquin Phoenix's character after arriving in New York in 1921, Cotillard gives a powerfully subdued performance full of hurt and anger that many are citing as her biggest achievement since portraying Piaf. »

- Nigel M Smith

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Cannes Check 2014: Abderrahmane Sissako's 'Timbuktu'

12 May 2014 3:14 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Welcome back to Cannes Check, In Contention's annual preview of the films in Competition at this year's Cannes Film Festival, which kicks off on May 14. Taking on different selections every day, we'll be examining what they're about, who's involved and what their chances are of snagging an award from Jane Campion's jury. Next up, the Competition's only African entry: Abderrahmane Sissako's "Timbuktu." The director: Abderrahmane Sissako (Mauritanian/French, 52 years old). Another of this year's five newcomers, Sissako has established himself as one of Africa's premier auteurs, though he's been based in France since the early 1990s -- a background that complements his favored themes of globalization and outsider identity. Born in Mauritania, he moved with his family at an early age to Mali, where he completed his schooling, before studying film at Russia's Gerasimov Institute of Cinematography in Moscow -- an institution that also boasts Aleksandr Sokurov and Andrei Tarkovsky among its alumni. »

- Guy Lodge

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