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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 1996

1-20 of 67 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Here’s What It’s Like to Shoot an American Movie In Cuba Today

23 June 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Shooting a feature film in Cuba comes with a unique set of challenges that make the usual logistical hurdles of filmmaking seem like nothing. Still, those who have had the opportunity to shoot in the socialist country say they wouldn’t trade the experience for anything. As the U.S. trade embargo with Cuba comes to an end, film production in the country is expected to ramp up.

While Hollywood studio productions like “Fast 8” and “Transformers: The Last Knight” claimed to be “making history” earlier this year by being the first American films to shoot in Havana in half a century, two American directors had already shot independent films in Cuba on the heels of the relaxed travel restrictions by the United States government: Bob Yari’s “Papa Hemingway in Cuba” and Ben Chace’s “Sin Alas” (“Without Wings”).

Read More: ‘Sin Alas’ – First American Film Shot in Cuba »

- Graham Winfrey

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Movie Review: Genius

21 June 2016 11:21 AM, PDT | CinemaNerdz | See recent CinemaNerdz news »

The film Genius was not genius for me. It contained a wonderful cast and had enormous potential, but fell flat completely. I’m getting drowsy just thinking back on it. However, keep in mind that reviewing film is subjective. I did not enjoy Genius, which by no means infers that someone else might not enjoy it. So, in fairness, let me expound on what you can expect and you can make your own decision.

This story is concerned with the relationship between novelist Thomas Wolfe (Jude Law) and editor Max Perkins (Colin Firth), noteworthy for his publishing the works of Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald. The film begins with Wolfe waiting to see if his manuscript will be accepted for publication by Scribner’s Sons Publishing. Thomas, an eccentric over-expressive writer, fully believes he will be rejected as he has been time and time again. To his surprise, Perkins »

- Betsy Russo

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Review: Genius

14 June 2016 11:40 PM, PDT | JoBlo.com | See recent JoBlo news »

Plot: The story of famed literary editor Maxwell Perkins (Colin Firth) and his relationship with the brilliant, tortured Thomas Wolfe (Jude Law). Review: For those not in the know, Maxwell Perkins was arguably the most important literary editor of the twentieth century, having discovered Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald among others. Famous for his tact in helping authors realize their full potential, in... Read More »

- Chris Bumbray

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John Singleton Sounds Off On the ‘Dismal’ State of Contemporary Black Cinema

13 June 2016 11:31 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences hosted a 25th anniversary screening of John Singleton’s “Boyz N the Hood” at the Sva Theatre in New York City last Sunday as part of their “Spotlight on Screenwriting” series. This followed an event in Los Angeles the Academy hosted for the film on Friday.

After the screening, Oscar-nominated writer and director Singleton sat down with acclaimed author Walter Mosley to discuss what “Boyz” means 25 years later, including how it launched its career, how time has shifted its cultural weight and, for Singleton, how film increasingly struggles to mean anything culturally. Read five highlights from the talk below:

Read More: John Singleton Channels August Wilson – Pens Op-ed On White Directors Helming Black Films

Singleton uses two words to describe the current state of black cinema: “Dismal” and “abysmal.” 

At the discussion, Singleton repeatedly discussed his interest in films specific to culture and afro-centric experiences. Yet he lamented that films like that are not being made by other minority directors, especially in the studio system.

“It doesn’t matter how many hits and how much money the movies are making,” said Singleton. “They don’t have any cultural consciousness to them now. They have smatterings and little bits here and there, but it’s abysmal. It’s not like every movie has to make a statement at all. Movies don’t have to preach, they’re entertainment first.”

“But in terms of cultural weight – if we have cultural weight, it will be entertaining. And that’s what I feel I try to go for. I just try to rep hard for Spike [Lee], when he was starting he was trying to get people to say ‘hey listen, we can have our own idiom in film. We can have a black film aesthetic. We can have a thing that’s unique.’ When I do whatever I’m trying to do, I’m still trying to rep that,” he said.

This lack of personal voices in film is a result of a studio culture that he doesn’t think would support “Boyz N the Hood” today. 

Mosley and Singleton broke down how unlike government-sanctioned international cinema that “gives artists free reign to have dissenting views,” said Singleton, cultural specificity is lost in commerce-driven american cinema.

“There are so many stories that have yet to be chronicled about what really went on in Los Angeles in the early 80s,” said Singleton. “Yet our film culture is all based on commerce. You have a paucity of personal voices in film. Yes, you have a lot of independent films that are getting made, but even so they’re not what they were. You don’t have as many anachronistic true voices that are different from the norm. You have that at a lower level where people are making films on their iPhones now, doing new stuff.”

“There used to be a time where you had a support of these acrostic voices. These films that were really specific…you don’t have that with the studios right now,” Singleton added. “That’s why American cinema is really suffering right now. It’s sort of like the small movies are the farm stuff for the big films. If George Lucas didn’t make ‘American Graffiti,’ he wouldn’t have ‘Star Wars.’ And ‘American Graffiti’ is specific to a sort of time and place that was changing and evolving. You could never make those films now. You could never make ‘Boyz N the Hood’ now.”

Morris believed in spite of media attention from Black Lives Matter, the push for awareness of minority voices will not translate directly to more prominence for black artists.

“In truth, Black Lives Matter says we’re paying attention to everything because if our lives don’t matter then your lives don’t matter,” said Morris. “And they’ve done a lot of work and they are doing a lot of work. But I think it’s a long journey from that to those 25, 35, 135 million dollar movies.”

Boyz N the Hood” came from a young USC grad making an identity as “a black filmmaker repping Los Angeles.”

Singleton describes his first feature as a bridge between what he saw and grew up with in Los Angeles and his study of Italian neorealism (films like “The Bicycle Thieves” and “Open City”).  Yet there was one figure in Singleton’s life who started the whole quest.

“I look at it as a time capsule of what I was thinking and feeling at the time,” said Singleton. “I was 20 years old and I went and saw ‘Do the Right Thing,” which came out in the summer of 1989. Spike [Lee] has always been my cinematic big brother. Before I went to school and he visited La he pushed other people out of the way to shake my hand. I told him I was going to USC Film School and for him to watch out for me. So I went to school for four years rapping black cinema. I was one of the only black filmmakers and students in a predominantly white film culture. It was a continued marginalization – the attitude was there was only one Spike Lee. I was like, ‘I’m not the next Spike Lee, I’m the next John Singleton.’”

The need to create “Boyz” was driven by Singleton’s desire to write a film about what he knew: to go back to his family and figure out this story.

“I was at USC, which was still adjunct to the neighborhood I was growing up in,” said Singleton. “And I wouldn’t say I was having Ptsd because I was still in the environment, but I was having dreams like that. Having dreams about the stuff I’d seen in my childhood and teenage years. But I’m on an island – if you step off the campus, you’re in the mix. This is the 80s still. The script for ‘Boyz’ came out of that.”

Read More: The 10 Best Oscar-Nominated Directors

There are promising movies to Singleton that are immersed in a time and place. A favorite of his? “Beasts of the Southern Wild.” 

Singleton and Mosley lavished praise on Benh Zeitlin’s 2012 film, which Mosley helped foster when Zeitlin brought the script to Sundance Labs in 2008.

“Beautiful, beautiful film,” said Singleton. “Benh [Zeitlin] did a great job on that. There a scene where she goes over on that ferry and goes to that place, and it’s a questionable place…you don’t know if she’s seeing her mother or a vision of her mother, and the woman fries that alligator tail. And she’s telling this quasi-sexual story. But that never could’ve been done if the filmmakers didn’t live down there. And he’s not black, but he’s a brother, you know? If you see that movie, he takes you somewhere special and different, and he does it in an interesting, lyrical kind of way.”

The two took inspiration from how Zeitlin and his crew went spent several months in Louisiana taking in the culture of a world that would become The Bathtub. “They lived with the film,” said Mosley. Singleton thought other filmmakers should take note.

“I’m interested in doing a quasi-sort of thing with Chinese kids. I’m not Chinese. But I’m going to immerse myself in what these kids are going for,” said Singleton. “There’s not enough of that. And you can be from a certain culture and not know anything about where you’re from, too. That’s why a lot of black filmmakers are making marginal films right now. Because they’re not really astute at what the weight is that came before them. If you’re making gumbo, and the base is bad, it’s not going to taste good.”

Singleton wants his work to serve as a “conduit” for the voiceless. 

Director of eight films and three TV shows since “Boyz,” Singleton has kept himself busy in the past 25 years. Yet the work that interests him to this date remains small, personal, ostracized stories.

“I always wanted to be the kind of storyteller that was still accessible to folks,” said Singleton. “I’m doing Snowfall [the upcoming series for FX], I have another show called Rebel which just got announced… I’m interested in continuing the foundation that was set with ‘Boyz.’ Near my office there’s a park I go to, and I see people who just got released, people who are schizophrenic, people who are living from halfway house to halfway house. When you’re in and around folks, you get stories.”

“Everyone has stories to tell, but not everyone has a way to tell it. Not everyone can sit down and write it, damn near make a movie about it. But what I feel is that I’m a conduit for those folks,” he said. “And I’m not so visible that I’m not accessible. I’m not on TV all the time, I’m not doing the celebrity thing. I’d like to think I work like Ernest Hemingway. He would travel to different places, and he would write about his experiences. I love listening and talking to folks, and that’s how I get the rhythm and cadence of language.”

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Related stories2017 Oscar Predictions: Best Picture2017 Oscar Predictions: Best Director2017 Oscar Predictions: Best Actor »

- Russell Goldman

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Passion project by Anne-Katrin Titze

12 June 2016 3:03 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Nicole Kidman haunts Jude Law as he speaks on John Logan's script for Michael Grandage's Genius Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Laura Linney on Mrs Maxwell Perkins: 'She was kept outside of Manhattan, sort of away from the cultural hotbed of the city' Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze In Genius, Maxwell Perkins (Colin Firth), who wears a hat at all times, even indoors while working in shirtsleeves or during dinner with his wife and five daughters, knows good writing when he sees it. Mrs Perkins (Laura Linney), a playwright herself, shoots her husband knowing glances. She is treated by Thomas Wolfe (Jude Law) as though she were as meaningless as a speck of dirt, while his mistress and patron, the married Mrs Aline Bernstein (Nicole Kidman), knows their relationship is doomed. Scribner’s Sons editor Perkins previously worked with Ernest Hemingway (Dominic West) and F Scott Fitzgerald (Guy Pearce) who were haunted by different demons than the compulsive Wolfe and only briefly make an appearance here as does Zelda (Vanessa Kirby).

At the New York premiere, Laura Linney stated that A Scott Berg's Max Perkins: Editor of Genius and her grandmother helped shape her character »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Watch Nicole Kidman Go Head-to-Head with Colin Firth in Exclusive Clip from Genius

9 June 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

In this exclusive clip from upcoming biographical drama Genius, you can cut the tension with a butter knife. The dinnertime scene begins with Look Homeward, Angel author Thomas Wolfe, played by Jude Law, describing the major role costume designer Aline Bernstein (Nicole Kidman) has played in the production of his latest novel. Bernstein shakes off the praise, turning instead to Maxwell Perkins (Colin Firth), the famous editor of authors like Wolfe, Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald. "Tom speaks of your contribution with such passion," Bernstein tells Perkins, reminding Wolfe that Perkins "is the genius who made all of your dreams come true. »

- Andrea Park, @scandreapark

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Watch Nicole Kidman Go Head-to-Head with Colin Firth in Exclusive Clip from Genius

9 June 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

In this exclusive clip from upcoming biographical drama Genius, you can cut the tension with a butter knife. The dinnertime scene begins with Look Homeward, Angel author Thomas Wolfe, played by Jude Law, describing the major role costume designer Aline Bernstein (Nicole Kidman) has played in the production of his latest novel. Bernstein shakes off the praise, turning instead to Maxwell Perkins (Colin Firth), the famous editor of authors like Wolfe, Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald. "Tom speaks of your contribution with such passion," Bernstein tells Perkins, reminding Wolfe that Perkins "is the genius who made all of your dreams come true. »

- Andrea Park, @scandreapark

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Film Review: Genius

7 June 2016 9:01 PM, PDT | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

All the elements inherent in many successful movies are present in the upcoming Colin Firth and Jude Law biographical film, Genius.  Gifted actors (the aforementioned are joined by Nicole Kidman and Laura Linney, among others), a seasoned screenwriter (John Logan, who wrote Gladiator and The Aviator, among others), and the trappings—from costumes to sets—of period movies.  But, when it comes to the end product, the total for Genius is not greater than the sum of its parts.  The film is loud on the surface but mostly flat underneath.

Jude Law plays the misunderstood early 20th Century American novelist Thomas Wolfe.  In the opening scenes, he walks into the office of famed New York editor Max Perkins, already a successful publisher of the works of F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway.  Perkins, played by a solid Colin Firth (one of the few outstanding lead performances in the film), becomes »

- J Don Birnam

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Working with Genius by Anne-Katrin Titze

7 June 2016 7:01 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

A Scott Berg, Michael Grandage, Nicole Kidman, Laura Linney, John Logan and Jude Law Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze Lionsgate and Roadside Attractions hosted a Museum of Modern Art premiere for Michael Grandage's Genius with Colin Firth, Jude Law, Nicole Kidman and Laura Linney, written by John Logan (Martin Scorsese's The Aviator, Oliver Stone's Any Given Sunday, Sam Mendes' Spectre and Skyfall), based on Max Perkins: Editor of Genius, by A Scott Berg. Dominic West as Ernest Hemingway, Guy Pearce as F Scott Fitzgerald and Vanessa Kirby as Zelda Fitzgerald round out their literary world.

John Logan on Scott Berg's Katharine Hepburn for Cate Blanchett: 'He absolutely offered some insight' Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze Angela Ashton, Joel Grey, Martha Plimpton, Oren Moverman, Kathleen Turner, Keith Urban, Spotlight screenwriter Josh Singer, Tom Wolfe, Zach Grenier, Elena Kampouris, Lilly Englert, Elena Rusconi, Laura Michelle Kelly, Tommy Tonge, Nan and Gay Talese, »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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The Hotel Ritz, Where Princess Diana Spent Her Last Night - and an Ernest Hemingway Classic Was Safely Stowed - Re-Opens in Paris

6 June 2016 2:40 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Paris is putting on The Ritz again - after its most celebrated hotel re-opened Monday. The Hotel Ritz, where Princess Diana spent her last evening in 1997, opened its doors to customers following four years of renovations and a delay caused by a major fire in January. Owned today by Egyptian billionaire Mohamed Al Fayed, whose son Dodi was Diana's boyfriend and died in the same car crash that killed the princess, the Ritz has been a Paris landmark since opening on Place Vendome in 1898. Among its celebrity clientele, The Ritz has counted icons as diverse as Charlie Chaplin, designer Coco Chanel, »

- Peter Mikelbank

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Genius Review

6 June 2016 10:47 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

As far as creative-type biopics go, Genius is pretty harmless. John Logan’s screenplay (based on A. Scott Berg’s novelization) evokes the drawn-out, whimsical language of the late Thomas Wolfe’s vivacious energy, while Michael Grandage’s direction navigates a provocative, endearing time in American publication. Writers like Wolfe, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway were charming socialites with their eloquent verbiage, but behind every best seller was a desk-chained editor, killing scribbled darlings without remorse.

This is certainly a story of passion – and a mind consumed by praise – but more importantly, Grandage pays homage to the lesser-known heroes (and often-thought villains) of authored content. Praise be to the oh-so-overlooked editors, as bastardized and under-appreciated as they might be!

Behind every man stands a good woman, and behind every writer stands a good editor. Max Perkins (Colin Firth) is one such wrangler of talent, and his latest muse – Thomas Wolfe »

- Matt Donato

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Eureka

20 May 2016 7:21 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Nicolas Roeg's bizarre blend of high drama, searing sex and over-the-top brutality waited a year, only to be given a tiny American release. It then dropped out of sight. We're now in a better position to appreciate the show's great actors - especially Theresa Russell, the boldest and bravest actress of the 1980s. Eureka Blu-ray Twilight Time Limited Edition Small>1983 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 130 min. / Ship Date May 10, 2016 / available through Twilight Time Movies / 29.95 Starring Gene Hackman, Theresa Russell, Rutger Hauer, Jane Lapotaire, Mickey Rourke, Ed Lauter, Joe Pesci, Helena Kallianiotes, Corin Redgrave, Joe Spinell, Frank Pesce, Timothy Scott. Cinematography Alex Thomson Production Designer Michael Seymour Film Editor Tony Lawson Original Music Stanley Myers Written by Paul Mayersberg from a book by Marshall Houts Produced by Jeremy Thomas Directed by Nicolas Roeg

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

I remember Nicolas Roeg's Eureka as being one of the biggest busts of the 1980s. »

- Glenn Erickson

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Why People Are Upset About the Kardashians' Recent Trip to Cuba

9 May 2016 10:35 AM, PDT | Popsugar.com | See recent Popsugar news »

Havana »

- Kelsey Garcia

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The Kardashian-Jenners vs. Goop: Which Mother's Day Gift Guide Reigns Supreme?

6 May 2016 10:20 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

It's that time of year again! As most of us launch into a last-minute search for the perfect Mother's Day present, we can't help but take a peek at the luxe and impractical items the Kardashian-Jenner clan and Gwyneth Paltrow's lifestyle brand, Goop, famously recommend every year. You know, for inspiration. Do they boast pretty options? We'd be offended if there weren't. Are they financially responsible? Yes - but only if your first name starts with a K. Keep scrolling to see how the Kardashian-Jenner and Goop Mother's Day gift guides rank up. Most Random GiftKardashian-Jenner Gift Guide: Woodlot »

- Grace Gavilanes

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Film Review: ‘Papa Hemingway in Cuba’ is Sadly Inauthentic

3 May 2016 1:10 PM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – Getting the opportunity to trod upon the very ground that Ernest Hemingway once trod must have been a heady experience for the producers of “Papa Hemingway in Cuba.” But location simply isn’t enough if such a literary legend is to come to life.

Rating: 2.0/5.0

The film was directed by noted producer Bob Yari, his second effort, but it smacked of something that had problems all along the way, including sound design and story structure. Yes, the production got permission to film at the actual sites of Hemingway’s haunts in Cuba – his house, for example, had been lovingly preserved by the government there – but unfortunately that seemed like enough for the film. There was absolutely no life to the story, and there were several bad casting choices…including Papa Hemingway…and the film lands with a thud rather than a heralding for the man, image and essence of the legendary writer. »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Francis Ford Coppola on His Longing to Be ‘Impressive’

29 April 2016 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Francis Ford coppola has won nearly every award in the book, with multiple Oscars and prizes from guilds, critics groups and festivals. And on April 29, he will add one more kudo to that list: Turner Classic Movies will honor him with a hand and footprint ceremony at Hollywood’s Tcl Chinese Theater.

But Coppola’s industry start was both auspicious and far from auteur.

On May 10, 1962, Coppola won the top prize in UCLA’s Samuel Goldwyn Foundation Creative Writing Contest. It netted him $2,000 plus a front-page story in Variety. As the filmmaker told Variety recently, “Two thousand was a vast sum for someone who didn’t have more than a hundred dollars.”

He started work with king of the low-budget pics Roger Corman, writing and directing the 1963 horror pic “Dementia 13” on a budget of $40,000 and a shooting schedule of nine days. Within a decade, he became one of the »

- Malina Saval

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Film Review: ‘Papa: Hemingway in Cuba’

27 April 2016 4:33 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Despite its obvious sincerity of purpose, and the cachet of its having been filmed on locations where the real-life drama actually unfolded, “Papa: Hemingway in Cuba” is disappointingly plodding and ham-fistedly obvious in its attempts to offer an up-close and personal portrait of a mood-swinging, self-loathing 59-year-old Ernest Hemingway. The movie — reportedly the first Us production filmed in Havana in more than five decades — is based on an autobiographical screenplay by the late Denne Bart Petitclerc, who was befriended by the legendary author in 1959, and witnessed Hemingway at his most charismatic and least excusable. But “Papa” never transcends the tropes of a formulaic biopic that views its famous subject through the eyes of a worshipful young devotee.

Ticketbuyers may be lured by the somewhat misleading TV spots that make this rare directorial effort by veteran producer Bob Yari (“Crash”) look like an action-adventure set against the backdrop of the Cuban Revolution. »

- Joe Leydon

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Papa: Hemingway in Cuba review – Hollywood's Havana horror

27 April 2016 2:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The first Hollywood film to be shot in Cuba since Castro isn’t close but no cigar – the Ernest Hemingway biopic is an oceangoing embarrassment

Papa: Hemingway in Cuba holds the distinction of being the first Hollywood production to shoot on the island nation since 1959. But other film-makers looking to leave their mark need not fret, as there’s still an opportunity to make the first American film shot there since Fidel Castro came to power that isn’t a complete, mortifying embarrassment.

Papa is another biopic-through-the-lens of a young acolyte, similar to the recent debacle Nina, though this time its screenplay was written by the witness himself. Giovanni Ribisi is Ed Myers (name changed from the late Denne Bart Petitclerc), a newspaperman in Miami in the late 1950s. Abandoned by his father at a young age, as we’re told through lugubrious narration, he turned to the books of »

- Jordan Hoffman

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Papa: Hemingway in Cuba review – Hollywood's Havana horror

27 April 2016 2:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The first Hollywood film to be shot in Cuba since Castro isn’t close but no cigar – the Ernest Hemingway biopic is an oceangoing embarrassment

Papa: Hemingway in Cuba holds the distinction of being the first Hollywood production to shoot on the island nation since 1959. But other film-makers looking to leave their mark need not fret, as there’s still an opportunity to make the first American film shot there since Fidel Castro came to power that isn’t a complete, mortifying embarrassment.

Papa is another biopic-through-the-lens of a young acolyte, similar to the recent debacle Nina, though this time its screenplay was written by the witness himself. Giovanni Ribisi is Ed Myers (name changed from the late Denne Bart Petitclerc), a newspaperman in Miami in the late 1950s. Abandoned by his father at a young age, as we’re told through lugubrious narration, he turned to the books of »

- Jordan Hoffman

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Win A Papa: Hemingway In Cuba Prizepack

25 April 2016 2:21 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“In order to write about life, you must first live it.” – Ernest Hemingway

The first Hollywood film to shoot on location in Cuba since the 1959 revolution, Papa:Hemingway in Cuba is the true-life story of a young journalist who finds a father figure in legendary author Ernest Hemingway.  Their relationship began in the late 1950’s when Ed Myers, then a junior reporter at The Miami Herald, wrote a fan letter to his idol. Myers thought he was being pranked when the larger than life Hemingway phoned the newsroom a week later, inviting him to Havana.

”Good letter, kid,” the famous voice growled. ”You like to fish?“

Hidden away at his private estate with his wife Mary, the elusive author mentors Myers in fishing, drinking, and finding his voice while the Cuban Revolution boils up around them. In this turbulent landscape, observing an icon in his twilight years, Myers discovers his strength »

- Movie Geeks

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