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Win Jeremiah Johnson on Blu-ray

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Competitions

To mark the release of Jeremiah Johnson on 12th June, we’ve been given 2 copies to give away on Blu-ray.

Soured by civilization, Jeremiah Johnson sets out in the mid 1800s to be a mountain man, seeking solitude in a wilderness whose purity he never questioned. His first Rocky Mountain winter almost kills him. Starving and nearly frozen, he finds refuge with a wily old trapper (Will Geer) whose survival teaching includes going eyeball to eyeball with a grizzly.

Robert Redford and two time Academy Award winner Sydney Pollack teamed for the second of their six films together on this box-office hit shot entirely in Utah. Jeremiah Johnson “gets back to Nature” in a way no film ever has before or since.

Please note: This competition is open to UK residents only

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The Small Print

Open to UK residents only The competition will close 12th
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"In Cold Blood" 50th Anniversary Screening, L.A. March 22

  • CinemaRetro
Laemmle’s Royal Theatre in Los Angeles will be presenting a 50th anniversary screening of Richard Brook’s 1967 film In Cold Blood, based upon the novel of the same name by Truman Capote. The 134-minute film, which stars John Forsythe, Robert Blake and Scott Wilson, will be screened on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 at 7:00 pm.

Please Note: At press time, Actor Scott Wilson is scheduled to appear in person for a discussion about the film following the screening.

From the press release:

Part of our Anniversary Classics series. For details, visit: laemmle.com/ac.

In Cold Blood (1967)

50th Anniversary Screening

Wednesday, March 22, at 7 Pm at the Royal Theatre

Followed by a Q & A with Actor Scott Wilson

In Cold Blood, the film version of Truman Capote’s immensely popular true crime novel, was nominated for four top Oscars in 1967. Richard Brooks received two nominations, for Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Gene Wilder: 12 Things You Didn’t Know About His Early Career

Gene Wilder: 12 Things You Didn’t Know About His Early Career
Before he achieved movie superstardom in the 1970s, Gene Wilder did Brecht on Broadway, Shaw in Louisville, and “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” with Kirk Douglas on the Great White Way.

Wilder, who died Aug. 28 at the age of 83, also once pocketed $7,000 in an arbitration case waged by the Writers Guild of America West because of four little words: “A Mel Brooks Film.” Here are 12 intriguing facts from Wilder’s early career, as documented in the pages of Variety.

Wilder’s first mention in Variety came in the March 7, 1961, edition, in a review of an Off Broadway play directed by Mark Rydell. “Roots” was described as a “seamy” English family drama with not much going for it, per our critic. But Wilder was “well-cast as the thick-skinned son.” 1963 was a busy year for Wilder. In March he co-starred with Anne Bancroft in a Broadway production of Bertolt Brecht
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Exclusive photos: Fran Kranz in new adaptation of Shakespeare’s ‘Midsummer Night’s Dream’

  • Hitfix
Exclusive photos: Fran Kranz in new adaptation of Shakespeare’s ‘Midsummer Night’s Dream’
Hollywood, the Dream Factory, is the apt setting for the latest cinematic update on William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Fran Kranz, Hamish Linklater, Lily Rabe, and Rachael Leigh Cook are among the cast in the new Midsummer adaptation. HitFix has an exclusive early look at the film. The new vision of one of the Bard’s greatest comedies is set in present-day Hollywood, a place where glamorous stars, commanding moguls, starving artists, and vaulting pretenders all vie to get ahead. The Athenians are Hollywood glitterati, the mechanicals (Bottom and his troupe of wannabe actors) are film students, and the fairies of the forest are hippies in Topanga Canyon, nestled in the Santa Monica Mountains just east of Malibu. Staging or filming a Shakespeare project four centuries after the incomparable playwright lived and after countless artists have already mounted productions of his plays poses several challenges. (Yes, really four centuries,
See full article at Hitfix »

The Waltons, Falcon Crest: Creator Earl Hamner Jr. Dies at 92

[caption id="attachment_46200" align="aligncenter" width="590"] via AllAboutTheWaltons.com. From Left: Cliff (Jason), Nancy (Elizabeth), Audrey (Erin) James (Jim Bob), Doris "Mother" Hamner (Olivia), Earl Hamner Jr. (John-Boy), Marian (Mary Ellen), Paul (Ben). Missing: Bill./caption]

Goodnight, John-Boy. Earl Hamner Jr. creator of The Waltons TV series and real-life counterpart to the John-Boy Walton (Richard Thomas) character has died at the age of 92. Premiering September 14, 1972, the series ran nine seasons before being cancelled by CBS. The TV series finale episode, "The Revel" aired June 1, 1991. It was followed up by several Waltons TV movies.

The Waltons was based on the Hamners' life in Schuyler, Virginia, and the main characters were inspired by the creator's family members. The cast of The Waltons includes: Thomas, Ralph Waite, Michael Learned, Ellen Corby, Will Geer, Judy Norton, Jon Walmsley, Mary Beth McDonough, Eric Scott, David W. Harper, Kami Cotler, Joe
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Earl Hamner Jr., Creator of ‘The Waltons,’ Dies at 92

Earl Hamner Jr., Creator of ‘The Waltons,’ Dies at 92
Earl Hamner Jr., the creator and narrator of CBS’ beloved, long-running family drama “The Waltons,” died Thursday in Los Angeles. He was 92 and had been diagnosed with cancer in June 2014, according to a Facebook post by his daughter.

She wrote: “I want to thank each and every one of you for your prayers, good wishes and kind thoughts – I can assure you that they sustained Dad and helped him to recover enough to proudly witness the final production of ‘Earl Hamner: Storyteller’, become the honored recipient of the Will Geer Theatricum Botanicum Humanitarian Award, and accept Media Heritage Founder’s Award. There is not a doubt in my mind that he would not have made it this far without you — and we had the good fortune to keep him in our lives a bit longer despite the odds against him. He never got enough of this great gift of
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Imitation of Life,’ ‘Being There,’ ‘Ghostbusters,’ and More Added to National Film Registry

Since 1989, the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress has been accomplishing the important task of preserving films that “represent important cultural, artistic and historic achievements in filmmaking.” From films way back in 1897 all the way up to 2004, they’ve now reached 675 films that celebrate our heritage and encapsulate our film history.

Today they’ve unveiled their 2015 list, which includes classics such as Douglas Sirk‘s melodrama Imitation of Life, Hal Ashby‘s Being There, and John Frankenheimer‘s Seconds. Perhaps the most popular picks, The Shawshank Redemption, Ghostbusters, Top Gun, and L.A. Confidential were also added. Check out the full list below.

Being There (1979)

Chance, a simple-minded gardener (Peter Sellers) whose only contact with the outside world is through television, becomes the toast of the town following a series of misunderstandings. Forced outside his protected environment by the death of his wealthy boss, Chance subsumes his late employer’s persona,
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Ghostbusters,’ ‘Top Gun,’ ‘L.A. Confidential’ Among 2015 National Film Registry Selections

‘Ghostbusters,’ ‘Top Gun,’ ‘L.A. Confidential’ Among 2015 National Film Registry Selections
Ghostbusters,” “Top Gun,” “L.A. Confidential” and “Being There” are among the Library of Congress’ 2015 selections for the National Film Registry.

Each year, the Library of Congress adds 25 notable films to its permanent collection, ensuring that the titles will be preserved for generations to come. The 2015 class is typically eclectic, ranging from silent films to 1980s blockbusters, edgy indies to educational films such as the Disney-produced 1946 entry “The Story of Menstruation.”

“Selecting a film for the National Film Registry recognizes its importance to cinema and America’s cultural and artistic history,” said acting Librarian of Congress David Mao. “The registry is an invaluable way to advance public awareness of the richness, creativity and variety of our nation’s film heritage.”

The 2015 selections bring the number of titles in the registry to 675. The films are selected by Library of Congress staffers and the National Film Preservation Board, after reviewing nominations made
See full article at Variety - Film News »

In Cold Blood

More than one feature film looks at the making of this picture, focusing on its author, Truman Capote. Criterion's disc returns the discussion to Richard Brooks, the director that dared adapt an unfilmable novel of lurid, unthinkable crime on the Kansas prairie. It's also a last gasp of artistic B&W cinematography from Hollywood, thanks to the indelible images of Conrad Hall. In Cold Blood Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 781 1967 / B&W / 2:35 widescreen / 134 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date November 20, 2015 / 39.95 Starring Robert Blake, Scott Wilson, John Forsythe, Paul Stewart, Gerald S. O'Loughlin, Jeff Corey, John Gallaudet, James Flavin, John Collins, Charles McGraw, Will Geer. Cinematography Conrad L. Hall Production Designer Robert F. Boyle Film Editor Peter Zinner Original Music Quincy Jones Written by Richard Brooks from the novel by Truman Capote Produced and Directed by Richard Brooks

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Some directors just want to work. Others
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Reivers

Steve McQueen spent most of the 1960s avoiding lightweight movie roles -- only to do well with his winning comedy-drama performance in William Faulkner's most cheerful tale of old Mississippi. Get set for music by John Williams and an exciting climactic horse race. In storytelling terms this show would seem to have given Steven Spielberg a few ideas. The Reivers Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1969 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 106 min. / Street Date August 25, 2015 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Steve McQueen, Rupert Crosse, Mitch Vogel, Sharon Farrell, Will Geer, Ruth White, Michael Constantine, Clifton James, Juano Hernandez, Lonny Chapman, Diane Ladd, Ellen Geer, Dub Taylor, Allyn Ann McLerie, Charles Tyner, Burgess Meredith. Cinematography Richard Moore Film Editor Thomas Stanford Original Music John Williams Written by Irving Ravetch, Harriet Frank Jr. from the book by William Faulkner Produced by Irving Ravetch, Robert Relyea Directed by Mark Rydell

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

What? This
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Richard Dysart, Emmy-Winning ‘L.A. Law’ Actor, Dies at 86

Richard Dysart, Emmy-Winning ‘L.A. Law’ Actor, Dies at 86
Richard Dysart, a stage and screen actor known best for his performance as Leland McKenzie in the NBC legal drama “L.A. Law,” died Sunday in his home in Santa Monica. He was 86.

Dysart was born in Boston and raised in Maine. In the 1950s, he got his start in radio and worked at New York’s off-Broadway Circle in the Square Theatre.

He was a founding member of the American Conservatory Theater in the 60s, and played roles on Broadway throughout his career in “All in Good Time,” “The Little Foxes” and “A Place Without Doors.” His performance in “That Championship Season” for his role of the Coach which he created won him a Drama Desk Award in 1972.

In “L.A. Law” Dysart played patriarchal law firm partner LeLand McKenzie. The series aired for eight seasons from 1986-1994. Dysart’s performance earned him a primetime Emmy in 1992.

Dysart’s film appearances
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Richard Dysart, Emmy-Winning ‘L.A. Law’ Actor, Dies at 86

Richard Dysart, Emmy-Winning ‘L.A. Law’ Actor, Dies at 86
Richard Dysart, a stage and screen actor known best for his performance as Leland McKenzie in the NBC legal drama “L.A. Law,” died Sunday in his home in Santa Monica. He was 86.

Dysart was born in Boston and raised in Maine. In the 1950s, he got his start in radio and worked at New York’s off-Broadway Circle in the Square Theatre.

He was a founding member of the American Conservatory Theater in the 60s, and played roles on Broadway throughout his career in “All in Good Time,” “The Little Foxes” and “A Place Without Doors.” His performance in “That Championship Season” for his role of the Coach which he created won him a Drama Desk Award in 1972.

In “L.A. Law” Dysart played patriarchal law firm partner LeLand McKenzie. The series aired for eight seasons from 1986-1994. Dysart’s performance earned him a primetime Emmy in 1992.

Dysart’s film appearances
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Two of Redford's Biggest Box-Office Hits on TCM Tonight

Robert Redford movies: TCM shows 'Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,' 'The Sting' They don't make movie stars like they used to, back in the days of Louis B. Mayer, Jack Warner, and Harry Cohn. That's what nostalgists have been bitching about for the last four or five decades; never mind the fact that movie stars have remained as big as ever despite the demise of the old studio system and the spectacular rise of television more than sixty years ago. This month of January 2015, Turner Classic Movies will be honoring one such post-studio era superstar: Robert Redford. Beginning this Monday evening, January 6, TCM will be presenting 15 Robert Redford movies. Tonight's entries include Redford's two biggest blockbusters, both directed by George Roy Hill and co-starring Paul Newman: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, which turned Redford, already in his early 30s, into a major film star to rival Rudolph Valentino,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'The Waltons' dad Ralph Waite dies at age 85

'The Waltons' dad Ralph Waite dies at age 85
Ralph Waite, who played John Walton Sr. on The Waltons for nine seasons, died Thursday at age 85. While he’s best known for his Emmy-nominated role as the patriarch on the long-running 1970s CBS drama, Waite has had recent recurring roles on NCIS, Bones, and Days of Our Lives.

EW spoke with Waite last year for our annual Reunions Issue, bringing the Walton family back together more than three decades after their show went off the air. “What has moved me the most is the mail I’m still getting,” Waite told EW at the time. “They tell me that I was their surrogate father,
See full article at EW.com - Inside TV »

2002 Movie About Film Decomposition Included Among National Film Registry's 2013 Inductees

Gilda,’ ‘Pulp Fiction’: 2013 National Film Registry movies (photo: Rita Hayworth in ‘Gilda’) See previous post: “‘Mary Poppins’ in National Film Registry: Good Timing for Disney’s ‘Saving Mr. Banks.’” Billy Woodberry’s UCLA thesis film Bless Their Little Hearts (1984). Stanton Kaye’s Brandy in the Wilderness (1969). The Film Group’s Cicero March (1966), about a Civil Rights march in an all-white Chicago suburb. Norbert A. Myles’ Daughter of Dawn (1920), with Hunting Horse, Oscar Yellow Wolf, Esther Labarre. Bill Morrison’s Decasia (2002), featuring decomposing archival footage. Alfred E. Green’s Ella Cinders (1926), with Colleen Moore, Lloyd Hughes, Vera Lewis. Fred M. Wilcox’s Forbidden Planet (1956), with Walter Pidgeon, Anne Francis, Leslie Nielsen, Warren Stevens, Jack Kelly, Robby the Robot. Charles Vidor’s Gilda (1946), with Rita Hayworth, Glenn Ford, George Macready. John and Faith Hubley’s Oscar-winning animated short The Hole (1962). Stanley Kramer’s Judgment at Nuremberg (1961), with Best Actor Oscar winner Maximilian Schell,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Blu-ray Review: Criterion Updates Paranoia Classic ‘Seconds’

Chicago – John Frankenheimer’s “Seconds” with Rock Hudson was considered an unusual choice for The Criterion Collection when it was announced earlier this year. Never before available on Blu-ray and discontinued on DVD, the 4K restoration on this edition is the real draw, especially given that the film’s strength lies in its stunning visual compositions. With its canted angles and fish bowl aesthetic, Frankenheimer enhances what is actually a relatively weak script.

Seconds” is a film that I want to adore given my love for the filmmaker’s other works (especially “The Manchurian Candidate,” another ode to ’60s paranoia) and how I love well-written “Twilight Zone”-esque tales, but repeat viewing of this release reveals the film to be thematically thinner than it should be. There are some great ideas here about personality, success, and apathy but they’re not explored and the final twist is one that modern
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Criterion Collection: Seconds | Blu-ray Review

  • ioncinema
Selected for the Main Comp at the Cannes Film Festival in 1966, John Frankenheimer’s Seconds is a grim, nightmarish thriller that embodies many distinctive aspects of 1960s American cinema. Largely forgotten – one could argue for good reason – by all but the most devoted Frankenheimer fans, the film combines classic noir stylistics with the era’s emerging tremors of social revolution. Folded into the mix are elements of Sci-Fi and speculative fiction, creating a “what if” story filled with metaphors, meditations and mind-games.

The snappy plot begins with some odd occurrences in the quietly desperate life of Arthur Hamilton (John Randolph), a 50-ish, dry as toast bank manager who commutes into the city every day from his tidy colonial in leafy Scarsdale. Recently, the unnerved Hamilton has been receiving phone calls from an old college buddy long thought to be dead. This voice from the past entices Hamilton with vague promises
See full article at ioncinema »

Exploring Robert Redford films about alienation

  • Den of Geek
Feature Aliya Whiteley 14 May 2013 - 05:59

A true Hollywood star, Robert Redford is at his best in smaller, more personal films. Aliya picks three great films about alienation...

Robert Redford was the number one box office star of the early 70s, appearing in huge hits such as The Sting, The Way We Were, and Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid. None of those three films show him at his best as an actor, or address the kind of issues he felt passionately about.

His easy camaraderie with Paul Newman and his status as a sex symbol belied the political angle that influenced his decisions in filmmaking and acting. Once he had amassed enough power in Hollywood to call the shots, the roles he took changed; for me, his most interesting performances began once he believed in the message of the film he was making.

He remains a serious and passionate actor,
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Jeremiah Johnson’ Hollywood’s Most Beautiful – and Saddest – Western

  • SoundOnSight
Jeremiah Johnson

Directed by Sydney Pollack

Written by Edward Anhalt and John Milius

1972,

The Western, at its creative and commercial peak – the late 1960s-early 1970s – proved itself an astoundingly pliable genre. It could be molded to deal with topical subject matter like racism (Skin Game, 1971), feminism (The Ballad of Josie, 1967), the excesses of capitalism (Oklahoma Crude, 1973). It could be bent into religious allegories (High Plains Drifter, 1973), or an equally allegorical address of the country’s most controversial war (Ulzana’s Raid, 1972). Westerns could be used to deconstruct America’s most self-congratulatory myths (Doc, 1971), and address historical slights and omissions (Little Big Man, 1970). They could provide heady social commentary (Hombre, 1967), or simple adventure and excitement (The Professionals, 1966). They could be funny (The Hallelujah Trail, 1965), unremittingly grim (Hour of the Gun, 1967), surreal (Greaser’s Palace, 1972), even be stretched into the shape of rock musical (Zachariah, 1971) or monster movie (Valley of Gwangi, 1969).

But
See full article at SoundOnSight »

DVD Release: Black Like Me

  • Disc Dish
DVD Release Date: Dec. 11, 2013

Price: DVD $24.95

Studio: Vsc

The controversial 1964 racial drama Black Like Me stars the late James Whitmore as a white journalist who darkens his skin and passes for a black man in the deep South, where he encounters a great deal of racism from both white and black people.

Co-written and directed by Carl Lerner, the film is based on the landmark memoir of the same name by John Howard Griffin, who used pigment dyes and sun lamps to blend into “negro” society and gain a true perspective on what it was like to live as a black in the deep Jim Crow south.

Co-starring alongside Whitmore are Roscoe Lee Browne, Clifton James and Will Geer.

Restored from its original negative for this release (it was available previously in an inferior edition but has long been out of print), the DVD of Black Like Me wil include
See full article at Disc Dish »
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