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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 2003 | 1999

1-20 of 40 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Japanese Actress Shirley Yamaguchi, Who Starred in ‘House of Bamboo,’ Dies at 94

14 September 2014 8:46 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Yoshiko “Shirley” Yamaguchi, who starred in Japanese WWII pics posing as a Chinese but segued postwar to fame in Japanese and Hollywood films such as Samuel Fuller’s “House of Bamboo,” died at her Tokyo home of heart failure on Sept. 7, her family announced on Sunday. She was 94.

Born in 1920 in Manchuria to Japanese parents, Yamaguchi took the name Li Xianglan (in Japanese “Ri Koran”) to use in her Chinese singing and acting career, presenting herself as a local. Her films, including the 1938 “Honeymoon Express” and the 1940 “China Nights,” made her popular with Chinese audiences, while serving the propaganda purposes of her Japanese backers.

After the war she was tried and nearly executed for treason by a Chinese court, but was repatriated to Japan after her true identity became known. In the early postwar years, this time as Yoshiko Yamaguchi, she built a thriving singing and acting career in Japan. »

- Mark Schilling

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Camerimage to honour late Jerzy Lipman

12 September 2014 5:03 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

A retrospective of work by the Polish cinematographer, who worked with Polanski and Haneke, to screen at the festival.

Camerimage, the cinematography festival held in the Polish city of Bydgoszcz, is to pay tribute to the late Jerzy Lipman with a retrospective of his work.

Films shot by the Polish cinematographer will be screened as part of Camerimage’s Remembering the Masters series throughout the 22nd edition of the festival (Nov 15-22).

Included in the series will be Kanal (1957), Knife in the Water (1962), A Generation (1955), The Ashes (1965) and Colonel Wolodyjowski (1969).

Lipman, who died in 1983, is considered one of the most eminent cinematographers in Polish cinema history and is a co-originator of the Polish Film School movement.

Lipman endured occupation and imprisonment during the Second World War before he became a celebrated filmmaker. After his release in 1948, he joined the Cinematography Department of the National Film School in Łódź and graduated in 1952.

As a student, he was the »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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L'etrange 2014: White God is a Saccharin but Effective Guilty Pleasure [Review]

11 September 2014 10:11 AM, PDT | QuietEarth.us | See recent QuietEarth news »

I can't say if this intended or not, but there is a gimmick I noticed this year: almost every movie is introduced as either an "homage to" or an "adaptation of." White God one is no exception being a homage to Samuel Fuller's White Dog, itself an adaptation of Romain Gary's Chien Blanc.

Yes this is getting ridiculous.

If you have never read nor seen the previous versions of this tale, proceed now to your nearest cultural sale point (or Wikipedia if you're a lazy cheap-stake) for I'll assume in the remaining piece, that you are familiar with the story. The point being that this is a modern day, politically-correct-to-the-point-of-straining, pint of golden syrup version of the original material. A bit like what Disney's The Fox and the Hound is to the Daniel [Continued ...] »

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Venice Film Review: ‘Fires on the Plain’

2 September 2014 3:01 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

There are horrors-of-war movies (“Come and See”), and then there are World War II horror movies (“Dead Snow”), and judging by “Fires on the Plain,” it’s not entirely clear whether Japanese splatter director Shinya Tsukamoto understands the difference. The “Tetsuo: The Iron Man” helmer claims to have long dreamed of filming Shohei Ooka’s 1951 novel, already adapted far more artfully by Kon Ichikawa, but . Despite the credibility a Venice competition slot imparts, “Fires” feels more giallo than arthouse.

Reminiscent of the stretch where Teuton hack Uwe Boll tried to earn back some respect by directing pics about Auschwitz and Darfur, Tsukamoto’s passion project represents an earnest attempt to make a statement, held back by some of the B-movie helmer’s own worst instincts. Serving as both lead actor and his own d.p. (alongside Satoshi Hayashi), Tsukamoto shoots mostly handheld in a spastic, jump-cut style, seldom lingering long enough for us to absorb, »

- Peter Debruge

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Book Review: Samuel Fuller's Long Lost Pulp Novel 'Brainquake'

26 August 2014 12:31 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Samuel Fuller didn't do anything halfway, either in his life, or with his movies. His filmography reads like punch after punch of hard-hitting films — "Park Row," "Underworld U.S.A.," "Shock Corridor," "The Naked Kiss," "The Big Red One" — and it was 1982's "White Dog" that got him in particular trouble. The controversial film about dog trained to attack black people unsurprisingly found him at odds with Paramount, so Fuller went into self-imposed exile in France, where among his many activities, he turned to novel writing. It's something he had always done throughout his career, and even you might know his "The Dark Page" though the film version, "Scandal Street" (that was not directed by Fuller). However, "Brainquake," written during his foray abroad, fell through the cracks. The book was released overseas, published only in French and Japanese, and rather remarkably, never saw an English »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Daily | Photogénie 2, Cuarón, Breillat

20 August 2014 11:46 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

The theme of the new second issue of Photogénie is "everydayness" and includes essays on Lav Diaz, Ben Rivers, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Todd Haynes and Rainer Werner Fassbinder, and Hong Sang-soo and Hou Hsiao-hsien. Also in today's roundup of news and views: a review of Samuel Fuller's rediscovered novel, Brainquake; two chats with Glenn Kenny about Robert De Niro; an essay on Alfonso Cuarón’s Y tu mamá también (2001); a re-viewing of Stuart Cooper’s The Disappearance (1977); a consideration of the movies' influence on Portishead; and more. » - David Hudson »

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Daily | Almodóvar, Fuller, Godard

19 August 2014 5:58 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Criterion releases Pedro Almodóvar's Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! (1990) on DVD and Blu-ray today and not only have they posted Almodóvar's own notes on what inspired him to make it, they've also a conversation about Almodóvar between Kent Jones and Wes Anderson. Also in today's roundup of news and views: How Samuel Fuller killed off classic noir to make way for neo-noir; a fresh reading of David Simon's The Wire; thoughts on Jean-Luc Godard's Goodbye to Language; an excerpt from Ted Hope's new memoir; and more. » - David Hudson »

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Film Review: ‘A Fuller Life’

17 August 2014 6:56 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Sam Fuller’s daughter Samantha made a wise decision to utilize passages from her father’s autobiography as the soundtrack for her documentary “A Fuller Life.” Read aloud and with great feeling by actors and directors who admired and worked with him, these visceral, punchy sentences vividly conjure up an extraordinarily vital, fiercely engaged gestalt. But if the pic effectively evokes Fuller the man, it fails to do equal justice to Fuller the filmmaker, and its clip selections sometimes feel truncated and over-literal in their application. A loving tribute for those well versed in the Fuller canon, the doc may prove less revelatory than entertaining for neophytes.

There is something endearing about the sight of Samantha with her father’s rifle awkwardly slung over her shoulder as she pays affectionate homage to him in the film’s prologue; this hokiness feels infinitely preferable to the smudged resentments present in so many “daddy dearest” docus. »

- Ronnie Scheib

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Read An Exclusive Excerpt From Sam Fuller's Lost Novel Brainquake

11 August 2014 4:00 PM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

In 1993, disillusioned with the film industry and living in France, Sam Fuller - director of I Shot Jesse James, The Big Red One and White Dog - set pen to paper with the tale of a brain damaged mafia bagman trying to help a dead colleague's widow. The result, titled Brainquake, would prove to be the final effort in Fuller's long literary career and yet would never actually make it into print, not until now. Titan Books are releasing Fuller's lost final effort on August 12th and we've got an exclusive excerpt for you below. Find your own copy here.------------------------ Word was spreading there was not just a gun but a bomb under the baby's ass. Barricades had been rushed in, hastily erected, barely...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

»

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Daily | Viewing and Listening

11 August 2014 7:33 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

We open today's roundup of news and views with links to video essays by Tag Gallagher, author of books on John Ford and Roberto Rosselli and move on to a collection of 80s-era profiles of great filmmakers such as Martin Scorsese, Orson Welles, Francis Ford Coppola, Buster Keaton, John Cassavetes, Samuel Fuller, Woody Allen and many more. Plus, Peter Labuza talks with Gabe Klinger about Raoul Walsh, Joe Dante and, of course, the subjects of his documentary, Double Play: James Benning and Richard Linklater. » - David Hudson »

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2015 Oscars: Is David Ayer's 'Fury' the WWII Movie to Watch Out for This Yearc

4 August 2014 9:35 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

"In the end, they would hose out the blood, slap on some paint, and grab some cooks and clerks to crew up the vehicle again," David Ayer tells Michael Cieply at the New York Times, referring to his new film Fury, which several Oscar pundits were much higher on than I was initially, but this new editorial has me singing a different tune. As much as I loved Ayer's End of Watch (it made my top ten in 2012), his films have never been Oscar fodder. Even Training Day, which AYer wrote and Antoine Fuqua directed, saw Denzel Washington win an Oscar and Ethan Hawke also nominated. It didn't, however, earn a Best Picture or screenplay nomination. Add to that the dismal reaction to Ayer's Sabotage earlier this year from critics and audiences alike (I've still yet to see it) and it just appears he's a filmmaker with a touch outside the Oscar realm. »

- Brad Brevet

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James Shigeta, Star of ‘Flower Drum Song’ and ‘Die Hard’ Co-Star, Dies at 81

28 July 2014 7:29 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

James Shigeta, one of the first prominent Asian-American actors, who co-starred in “Die Hard” and starred in “Flower Drum Song,” died Monday at 81.

Though largely a TV actor who guest-starred on dozens of shows, he appeared memorably in hit 1988 action film “Die Hard,” in which he played executive Joseph Takagi, who refuses to give up the security code to the skyscraper’s bank vault when a group of German terrorists seizes the building. He was shot in the head by the group’s leader, Hans Gruber, played by Alan Rickman.

In the big-budget WWII film “Midway” (1976), which told the story of the key battle from both American and Japanese points of view, Shigeta was featured prominently in the role of Vice Admiral Nagumo, whose despair at Japan’s loss in the battle is moving.

The actor had most recently appeared in the 2009 film “The People I’ve Slept With,” directed by Quentin Lee. »

- Pat Saperstein

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James Shigeta, Star of ‘Flower Drum Song’ and ‘Die Hard’ Co-Star, Dies at 81

28 July 2014 7:29 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

James Shigeta, one of the first prominent Asian-American actors, who co-starred in “Die Hard” and starred in “Flower Drum Song,” died Monday at 81.

Though largely a TV actor who guest-starred on dozens of shows, he appeared memorably in hit 1988 action film “Die Hard,” in which he played executive Joseph Takagi, who refuses to give up the security code to the skyscraper’s bank vault when a group of German terrorists seizes the building. He was shot in the head by the group’s leader, Hans Gruber, played by Alan Rickman.

In the big-budget WWII film “Midway” (1976), which told the story of the key battle from both American and Japanese points of view, Shigeta was featured prominently in the role of Vice Admiral Nagumo, whose despair at Japan’s loss in the battle is moving.

The actor had most recently appeared in the 2009 film “The People I’ve Slept With,” directed by Quentin Lee. »

- Pat Saperstein

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James Shigeta, Top Asian-American Actor of Early '60s and 'Die Hard' Co-Star, Dies at 81

28 July 2014 6:31 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

James Shigeta, a top Asian-American actor of the early 1960s who starred in the Rodgers & Hammerstein musical Flower Drum Song, died Monday in Los Angeles, publicist Jeffrey Leavitt announced. He was 81. The handsome Hawaiian, who later appeared as the ill-fated chief executive of the Nakatomi corporation in the Bruce Willis action film Die Hard (1988), had a great two-year run in Hollywood starting in the late 1950s. Shigeta made his feature debut in Sam Fuller’s Los Angeles-set noir The Crimson Kimono (1959), playing a young detective, and followed that by portraying a young Chinese

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- Mike Barnes

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Locarno to honour Agnès Varda

3 July 2014 4:19 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

French director to receive the Pardo d’onore at the Locarno Film Festival next month - only the second woman to receive the honour.

French director Agnès Varda is to receive the Pardo d’onore (honorary Leopard) at the 67th edition of the Locarno Film Festival (Aug 6-16).

The festival’s tribute to her will be accompanied by screenings of a selection of her films: the features Cleo from 5 to 7 (1962), The Creatures (1966), Lions Love (…and Lies) (1969), Documenteur (1981), Vagabond (Sans toit ni loi, 1985), The Gleaners and I (Les glaneurs et la glaneuse, 2000) and The Beaches of Agnes (Les Plages d’Agnès, 2008), and the short film Oncle Yanco (1967), as well as the five episodes of the TV series Agnès de ci de là Varda (2011).

Varda will also take part in an on-stage coversation at the festival.

After working as a theatre photographer, Varda began directing in 1954 with the feature-length film La Pointe Courte, starring [link=nm »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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French Auteur Agnes Varda To Receive Locarno Fest Honorary Golden Pard

3 July 2014 1:32 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Rome – Pioneering French auteur Agnes Varda, often called the “Mother of the French New Wave,” will be honored by the Locarno Film Festival with its Pardo d’onore Swisscom lifetime achievement award.

 

The Belgian-born Varda, 85, has directed more than 30 films over a career spanning more than six decades, starting with her 1954 “La Pointe Courte,” with Philippe Noiret, also at his debut. Edited by Alain Resnais, this pic about a young Parisian couple spending a few days in a village on the Mediterranean coast to decide whether to stay together or not became a defining influence on the next generation of Gallic directors.

 

The tribute to Varda from the Swiss fest dedicated to indie and cutting-edge cinema will comprise screenings of a wide selection of her films, including “Cleo from 5 to 7,” (1962); “The Creatures” (1966); “Lions Love (…and lies),” (1969); “Documenteur,” (1981), “Vagabond” (1985); “The Gleaners and I” (2000); “The Beaches of Agnes” (2008); and the »

- Nick Vivarelli

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The Forgotten: "Die Katze" (1988)

25 June 2014 2:52 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

One of the highlights of this year's Edinburgh International Film Festival, it's already apparent, is a retrospective of the work of Dominik Graf, a genre specialist mostly unknown outside his natve Germany, who has worked in both film and TV, specialising mainly in crime dramas. The program also includes other German crime TV shows selected by Graf to contextualise his work (including Sam Fuller's Dead Pigeon on Beethoven Street and uber-rare work by Czech emigre Zbynek Brynych, best known otherwise for The Fifth Horseman is Fear).

Graf's work includes pieces from the seventies to the present day. By working in TV he has been able to work regularly, something denied most feature directors, and seems to thrive on the tight schedules and budgets. Nightwatch, a 1993 episode of the long-running series "Der Fahnder", comes on like Fleischer's The Narrow Margin, with a cop guarding a gangster's moll who doesn't »

- David Cairns

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The Definitive War Movies: 30-21

18 June 2014 6:54 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

As we continue with the list, we still see a lot of World War II, but throw in some World War I and Persian Gulf War, too. While some of the films in this portion of the list spin the war film into something a little more ingenious, it doesn’t completely rule out the idea of a patriotic call to arms film. We also see a few more foreign language films on the list, as well as some Oscar winners for their work. Without further ado, let’s light this candle.

courtesy of toutlecine.com

30.  Black Book (2006)

Directed by: Paul Verhoeven

Conflict: World War II

In 2008, the Dutch public named it the greatest Dutch film ever made. Who am I to argue? A surprisingly complete film from a director who has Showgirls and Hollow Man under his belt (and Starship Troopers and Robocop…I can’t be too hard »

- Joshua Gaul

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Line-up announced for Edinburgh International Film Festival 2014

28 May 2014 9:45 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Hyena

The full line-up has been announced for this year’s Edinburgh International Film Festival, which runs from Wednesday 18th to Sunday 29th June. In total, 156 features from 47 countries will be screened, with 11 world premieres, 7 European premieres and 95 UK premieres.

The festival opens with the world premiere of British drug trafficking thriller Hyena from writer-director Gerard Johnson, starring Peter Ferdinando, Stephen Graham, Neil Maskell, and MyAnna Buring. The closing night gala is the international premiere of romantic comedy We’ll Never Have Paris, directed by husband and wife team Jocelyn Towne and Simon Helberg (best known for The Big Bang Theory). Written by and also starring Helberg, it features Melanie Lynskey, Maggie Grace, Zachary Quinto, and Alfred Molina in its cast.

We’ll Never Have Paris

The American Dreams strand highlights cutting-edge new works from American independent cinema. Sofia Coppola’s The Bling Ring featured last year, and now Gia Coppola »

- Josh Slater-Williams

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Dominique Strauss-Kahn Movie, Philip Seymour Hoffman Pic Play at Edinburgh Fest

28 May 2014 2:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

London —  Edinburgh Intl. Film Festival line-up, which was unveiled by artistic director Chris Fujiwara Wednesday, includes 156 feature films from 47 countries. The festival, which runs from June 18 to 29, will include 11 world premieres, eight international premieres, seven European premieres and 95 U.K. premieres.

Highlights include Anton Corbijn’s “A Most Wanted Man,” starring the late Philip Seymour HoffmanGia Coppola’s “Palo Alto,” starring James Franco and Emma Roberts; and Abel Ferrara’s “Welcome to New York,” inspired by the case of former Imf managing director Dominique Strauss-Kahn, starring Gerard Depardieu.

Eiff will also host the world premiere of “Castles in the Sky” from Gillies MacKinnon, the story of the Scottish engineer and developer of radar Robert Watson-Watt (played by Eddie Izzard). The film is one of the contenders for the Michael Powell Award for British films, whose line-up was announced previously. Competitors also include “Set Fire to the Stars,” the debut feature from Andy Goddard, »

- Leo Barraclough

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 2003 | 1999

1-20 of 40 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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