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8 items from 2012


Review: Anna Karenina

2 December 2012 11:00 AM, PST | Slackerwood | See recent Slackerwood news »

My high-school class once spent an afternoon watching the 1956 movie War and Peace, and we susceptible sophomores fell hard for the Hollywood-ized love story with Audrey Hepburn, swoony Mel Ferrer and Henry Fonda (despite that flat drawl of "Nataaaahsha," all I can remember about the film now). I decided it would be fun to read Leo Tolstoy's novel (I was also show-offy, but never mind). I found out quickly that the story we adored in the movie was only a small, stripped-down part of a far more complicated novel, which included more of the war and much less of the romance. Plus, everyone had 10 names. The epilogues in particular were quite disappointing. At age 15, I preferred Hollywood over epic Russian literature.

The latest lavish adaptation of Anna Karenina, like that version of War and Peace, focuses is on love and romance and passion, although at least this time the »

- Jette Kernion

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Movie Review: The Hands of Orlac (Austria, 1924)

10 September 2012 5:58 PM, PDT | MoreHorror | See recent MoreHorror news »

By Colleen Wanglund, MoreHorror.com

Based on Maurice Renard’s 1920 novel Les Mains d’Orlac this earliest film version directed by Robert Wiene (The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari {1920}), though technically Austrian is a superb example of German Expressionism in the silent era of film.

Paul Orlac (Conrad Veidt) is a young and gifted pianist.  Returning home from a concert, Orlac is badly injured in a train wreck.  Orlac’s devoted wife Yvonne (Alexandra Sorina) begs Dr. Serral (Hans Homma) to save the pianist’s hands.  Serral removes the hands from the corpse of a recently executed robber/murderer and replaces Orlac’s hands, which were damaged beyond repair.  Serral does not tell Orlac of the transplant surgery, but he finds out anyway. 

Orlac returns home but his demeanor has changed.  He is in despair over the state of his hands and is afraid to touch his own wife.  Over the »

- admin

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DVD Playhouse--August 2012

1 August 2012 1:11 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By Allen Gardner

A Separation (Sony) This drama from Iran won the 2011 Best Foreign Film Oscar, telling the story of a couple who file for a legal separation, with the wife pushing for a divorce. He won’t leave his Alzheimer’s-afflicted father behind, while she is wanting to take their young daughter with her to the United States. After a series of misunderstandings, threats and legal actions, the couple find that there is more than just their marriage that’s on the line. Hyper-realistic to a fault, reminiscent of the neo-realist films that came out of post-ww II Europe, but also repressive and redundant in the extreme, with the characters seeming to throw the same temper tantrum for two hours straight while the story, meanwhile, seems stalled. Wildly overpraised film is a real litmus test, with viewers seeming to be staunch defenders or equally impassioned detractors. It did win an Oscar, »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Being Elmo – review

28 April 2012 4:03 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Movie puppeteers are a rather sinister bunch, among them the obsessed Michael Redgrave in Dead of Night, the repressed Mel Ferrer in Lili and the disturbed John Cusack in Being John Malkovich. But there is nothing but sweetness and light surrounding Kevin Clash, the first African-American to enter that great fraternity of American puppeteers associated with Frank Oz and Jim Henson. He began building his own puppets as a child in Baltimore under the encouraging aegis of loving working-class parents after watching TV shows in the 1960s, and after a serious apprenticeship was inducted into Sesame Street where he created the famous red-haired, pop-eyed, orange-nosed Elmo. He's now Sesame Street's senior puppet coordinator and muppet captain. Constance Marks's delightful, unpretentious documentary both captures the man in all his complex simplicity and throws light on his craft.

DocumentarySesame StreetThe MuppetsChildren's TVTelevisionPhilip French

guardian.co.uk © 2012 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. »

- Philip French

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Being Elmo – review

28 April 2012 4:03 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Movie puppeteers are a rather sinister bunch, among them the obsessed Michael Redgrave in Dead of Night, the repressed Mel Ferrer in Lili and the disturbed John Cusack in Being John Malkovich. But there is nothing but sweetness and light surrounding Kevin Clash, the first African-American to enter that great fraternity of American puppeteers associated with Frank Oz and Jim Henson. He began building his own puppets as a child in Baltimore under the encouraging aegis of loving working-class parents after watching TV shows in the 1960s, and after a serious apprenticeship was inducted into Sesame Street where he created the famous red-haired, pop-eyed, orange-nosed Elmo. He's now Sesame Street's senior puppet coordinator and muppet captain. Constance Marks's delightful, unpretentious documentary both captures the man in all his complex simplicity and throws light on his craft.

DocumentarySesame StreetThe MuppetsChildren's TVTelevisionPhilip French

guardian.co.uk © 2012 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. »

- Philip French

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“Nightmare City” (1980) Review

16 April 2012 2:49 PM, PDT | MoreHorror | See recent MoreHorror news »

By Chris Wright, MoreHorror.com

Nightmare City” (1980)

Directed By: Umberto Lenzi

Written By: Piero Mignoli, Tony Corti, Jose Luis Delgado

Starring: Hugo Stiglitz (Dean Miller), Laura Trotter (Dr. Anna Miller), Maria Rosaria (Sheila), Francisco Rabal (Major Warren Holmes), Sonia Viviani (Cindy), Eduardo Fajardo (Dr. Kramer) Mel Ferrer (General Murchison).

I never knew mindless killing could occur with no actual plot but apparently it really can! It is fairly difficult to defend this movie unless the movie watcher really likes incoherent films. This movie was released under numerous titles as well such as “City of the Walking Dead” and its Italian label “Incubo Sulla Cittá Contaminata.” This movie is not very well known and I found out why, the hard way.

The apparent plot is a news reporter named Dean (Hugo Stiglitz) is going to interview a scientist at a European airport about a recent nuclear incident. A random plane lands »

- admin

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Book Review: "Audrey Hepburn: Photographs 1953-1966", Published By Taschen

27 March 2012 3:00 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Audrey Hepburn: Photographs 1953 – 1966

Bob Willoughby

Published by Taschen

Hardcover, 11.2 x 14.1 in., 280 pages, £ 44.99

Isbn 978-3-8365-2737-8

Multilingual Edition: English, French, German

By Adrian Smith

Audrey Hepburn is iconic. Her image has perhaps eclipsed her performances in the many movies she starred in before her early retirement to focus on Unicef. This new collection from Taschen (previously available only in a limited art edition) demonstrates just why this happened. The camera simply loved Audrey Hepburn. These photographs, taken by Hollywood photographer Bob Willoughby, show that whether she was relaxing at home, posing for stills or working on set, she was a radiant, mesmerising presence. After first meeting at Paramount Studios in 1953 to promote Roman Holiday, Willoughby and Hepburn became close friends. The way she was able to relax in his presence clearly comes through in so many of these fabulous photos.

Although the book does serve to reinforce Hepburn's visual impact, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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'Funny Face' 55th Anniversary: 25 Things You Didn't Know About the Beloved Audrey Hepburn Musical

13 February 2012 11:46 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

"Funny Face" shouldn't have worked. It was a musical with a borrowed score, based on a stage play its author had failed to sell, with a leading man past his prime and a leading lady, 30 years younger, who had a thin singing voice. Indeed, the film, released 55 years ago today (on February 13, 1957), was not a hit. Yet today, it's regarded as a visually sumptuous classic, with Fred Astaire dancing with impossible grace at 58 and Audrey Hepburn in one of her most stylish, iconic performances. Still, as beloved as "Funny Face" is, many viewers may not know of the real-life love story that inspired the movie, or about the film's ties to such far-flung projects as the "Eloise" novels and the counterculture drama "Five Easy Pieces." Here, then, are 25 little-known facts about "Funny Face." 1. The movie's title and four of its songs came from George Gershwin's 1927 Broadway musical "Funny Face. »

- Gary Susman

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8 items from 2012


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