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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

11 items from 2015


Fiery Red-Head Hayward Is TCM's Star of the Month

3 September 2015 9:13 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Susan Hayward. Susan Hayward movies: TCM Star of the Month Fiery redhead Susan Hayward it Turner Classic Movies' Star of the Month in Sept. 2015. The five-time Best Actress Oscar nominee – like Ida Lupino, a would-be Bette Davis that only sporadically landed roles to match the verve of her thespian prowess – was initially a minor Warner Bros. contract player who went on to become a Paramount second lead in the early '40s, a Universal leading lady in the late '40s, and a 20th Century Fox star in the early '50s. TCM will be presenting only three Susan Hayward premieres, all from her Fox era. Unfortunately, her Paramount and Universal work – e.g., Among the Living, Sis Hopkins, And Now Tomorrow, The Saxon Charm – which remains mostly unavailable (in quality prints), will remain unavailable this month. Highlights of the evening include: Adam Had Four Sons (1941), a sentimental but surprisingly »

- Andre Soares

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75 Years Later, ‘The Great McGinty’ is still as relevant as any political satire since

20 August 2015 3:16 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

When we think about the “writer/director” we often think about the works of Quentin Tarantino, Kevin Smith, Paul Thomas Anderson, Jean-Luc Godard or Lars Von Trier. The auteurs who charge into the uphill battle of putting their own story to film. It’s more than a credit, it’s a type of filmmaker – one that more often than not starts outside of the studio system, one that more often than not considers themselves a writer first and a director second, one that falls in love with their own dialog. It’s very common now but it didn’t used to be.

75 years ago this week a film was released with the first “Written and Directed by” credit, making official something that had been going on in movie making since the evolution of narrative filmmaking and giving birth to the modern day writer/director. The first credited writer/director: playwright Preston Sturges, »

- Charlie Sanford

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Walker on TCM: From Shy, Heterosexual Boy-Next-Door to Sly, Homosexual Sociopath

9 August 2015 4:39 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Robert Walker: Actor in MGM films of the '40s. Robert Walker: Actor who conveyed boy-next-door charms, psychoses At least on screen, I've always found the underrated actor Robert Walker to be everything his fellow – and more famous – MGM contract player James Stewart only pretended to be: shy, amiable, naive. The one thing that made Walker look less like an idealized “Average Joe” than Stewart was that the former did not have a vacuous look. Walker's intelligence shone clearly through his bright (in black and white) grey eyes. As part of its “Summer Under the Stars” programming, Turner Classic Movies is dedicating today, Aug. 9, '15, to Robert Walker, who was featured in 20 films between 1943 and his untimely death at age 32 in 1951. Time Warner (via Ted Turner) owns the pre-1986 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer library (and almost got to buy the studio outright in 2009), so most of Walker's movies have »

- Andre Soares

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Hiroshima 70th Anniversary: Six Must-Watch Movies Remembering the A-Bomb Terror

6 August 2015 10:38 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'The Beginning or the End' 1947 with Robert Walker and Tom Drake. Hiroshima bombing 70th anniversary: Six movies dealing with the A-bomb terror Seventy years ago, on Aug. 6, 1945, the U.S. dropped the first atomic bomb over the city of Hiroshima. Ultimately, anywhere between 70,000 and 140,000 people died – in addition to dogs, cats, horses, chickens, and most other living beings in that part of the world. Three days later, America dropped a second atomic bomb, this time over Nagasaki. Human deaths in this other city totaled anywhere between 40,000-80,000. For obvious reasons, the evisceration of Hiroshima and Nagasaki has been a quasi-taboo in American films. After all, in the last 75 years Hollywood's World War II movies, from John Farrow's Wake Island (1942) and Mervyn LeRoy's Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo (1944) to Steven Spielberg's Saving Private Ryan (1998) and Michael Bay's Pearl Harbor (2001), almost invariably have presented a clear-cut vision »

- Andre Soares

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Exclusive: The Race Is On In Clip From Jack Hill's Cult Stock Car Flick 'Pit Stop'

22 June 2015 12:02 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

This summer, you've seen no shortage of tricked out vehicles getting destroyed in interesting ways in "Mad Max: Fury Road," while Dwayne Johnson literally flexed his way out of a cast in "Furious 7." But over forty years ago, director Jack Hill ("Coffy," "Foxy Brown") made a movie with both those things but with far less money and CGI enhancement. Today we have an exclusive clip from his newly restored cult film "Pit Stop." Read More: SXSW Review: 'Furious 7' Starring Vin Diesel, Dwayne Johnson, Jason Statham, Paul Walker & More  Starring Sig Haig, Richard Davalos, Brian Donlevy, Ellen Burstyn (billed as Ellen McRae), and Beverly Washburn, the film follows street punk Rick Bowman who gets bailed out of jail by a race promoter and put on the figure-8 track to square off against the dangerous Hawk Sidney. The film was shot on a real racetrack, and a lot of »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Arrow Video Bringing Pit Stop, La Grande Bouffe and Blood Rage To DVD/Bluray This June/August!

30 May 2015 2:17 PM, PDT | iconsoffright.com | See recent Icons of Fright news »

For a good while, fans of Arrow Video’s amazing releases had to put their heads in the laps and cry while listening to Joy Division, due to the releases not being U.S. capable (unless you had an all region player or liked to be a hacker…like the girl in Jurassic Park…). Well, Arrow is a company that cares, and they’ve expanded their releases to the States, and I for one, have been doing jumping jacks nonstop over it (not really, I still have a gut dammit).

We were sent some information that made us quite excited, and if you’re one of the cool kids (blame my daughter for my using of that phrase, she is obsessed with that crazily catchy song), you’ll be excited as well!

On June 30th, Arrow is bringing Pit Stop, Jack Hill’s awesome followup to Spiderbaby (another film that »

- Jerry Smith

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Oscar-Nominated Film Series: Gwtw Actress De Havilland Steals Show from Co-Stars in Romantic/Immigration Melodrama

7 May 2015 2:25 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Hold Back the Dawn': Olivia de Havilland behind Charles Boyer and Paulette Goddard 'Hold Back the Dawn' 1941 movie: Olivia de Havilland steals show as small-town teacher in love Olivia de Havilland shines in Mitchell Leisen's melodrama Hold Back the Dawn, a sort of opening bracket for the director's World War II-era films. Adapted by Billy Wilder and Charles Brackett from Ketti Frings' semi-autobiographical story, Hold Back the Dawn stars Charles Boyer as George Iscovescu, a Romanian dancer unable to enter the U.S. from Mexico due to immigration quotas imposed at the onset of the European conflict. Paulette Goddard is his scheming former partner, Anita, who marries an American to gain entry into the country only to immediately leave the duped husband. George adopts the idea – a naïve small-town schoolteacher visiting a Mexican border town is his prey. As the unsuspecting teacher, Olivia de Havilland radiates understanding and sympathy. »

- Doug Johnson

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Acteurism: Joel McCrea in "Barbary Coast"

27 April 2015 6:40 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

In 1935 director Howard Hawks had a reputation for directing fast action films that were shot like screwball comedies. Before the Hays code, he directed Paul Muni as an Al Capone persona for the “most violent picture” of the time, Scarface (1932). Films about violent sports and vehicles and the men in control of them also got the Hawks treatment with The Dawn Patrol (1930), The Crowd Roars (1932), and The Prizefighter and the Lady (1933). The tagline for that last one’s poster reads: “Girls! There’S A New Passion In Your Life!” Hawks’ strengths lie in that spectacle of unfettered action for the boys, star power for the girls. His marketing image had stepped out of genre pictures before with more straightforward dramas Tiger Shark (1932)and Today We Live (1933). In Twentieth Century (1934), Hawks even ventured into full screwball territory (I’d wager that the Code taking away his violent sensibilities may have something to do with this, »

- Zach Lewis

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Wright Was Earliest Surviving Best Supporting Actress Oscar Winner

15 March 2015 12:05 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright: Later years (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon.") Teresa Wright and Robert Anderson were divorced in 1978. They would remain friends in the ensuing years.[1] Wright spent most of the last decade of her life in Connecticut, making only sporadic public appearances. In 1998, she could be seen with her grandson, film producer Jonah Smith, at New York's Yankee Stadium, where she threw the ceremonial first pitch.[2] Wright also became involved in the Greater New York chapter of the Als Association. (The Pride of the Yankees subject, Lou Gehrig, died of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in 1941.) The week she turned 82 in October 2000, Wright attended the 20th anniversary celebration of Somewhere in Time, where she posed for pictures with Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour. In March 2003, she was a guest at the 75th Academy Awards, in the segment showcasing Oscar-winning actors of the past. Two years later, »

- Andre Soares

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Starmaker Allégret: From Gay Romance with 'Uncle' (and Nobel Winner) Gide to Simon's Movie Mentor

27 February 2015 9:46 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Marc Allégret: From André Gide lover to Simone Simon mentor (photo: Marc Allégret) (See previous post: "Simone Simon Remembered: Sex Kitten and Femme Fatale.") Simone Simon became a film star following the international critical and financial success of the 1934 romantic drama Lac aux Dames, directed by her self-appointed mentor – and alleged lover – Marc Allégret.[1] The son of an evangelical missionary, Marc Allégret (born on December 22, 1900, in Basel, Switzerland) was to have become a lawyer. At age 16, his life took a different path as a result of his romantic involvement – and elopement to London – with his mentor and later "adoptive uncle" André Gide (1947 Nobel Prize winner in Literature), more than 30 years his senior and married to Madeleine Rondeaux for more than two decades. In various forms – including a threesome with painter Théo Van Rysselberghe's daughter Elisabeth – the Allégret-Gide relationship remained steady until the late '20s and their trip to »

- Andre Soares

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Berlinale 2015. Correspondences #10

15 February 2015 9:46 PM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Dear Danny,

Ah, yes, the plague of "not getting it" is one that afflicts all of us festival-goers on occasion, but I admire your willingness to write on Peter Kern's peculiar film as well as Jiang Wen's totally gonzo farce (which you were nevertheless able to appreciate more than myself). As you and I both know, "getting it" isn't completely necessary and doesn't always get in the way of enjoyment and appreciation. Being a relaxed and open-minded viewer doesn't always make one an expert, but hopefully it prepares them for being responsive, a quality we should all aspire to whether we find ourselves in or outside of our wheelhouses. 

In my previous letter, I teased at an incredible viewing experience I had, and indeed it may be one my all-time favourite screenings. Let me start off by describing what is my new favourite place to sit and watch a »

- Adam Cook

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

11 items from 2015


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