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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 1997

1-20 of 26 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Richard Anderson, ‘Six Million Dollar Man’ and ‘Bionic Woman’ Actor, Dies at 91

31 August 2017 4:07 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Richard Anderson, who simultaneously played Oscar Goldman, leader of secret government agent the Osi, on both “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “The Bionic Woman” after a long career as a supporting actor in film and TV, died on Thursday in his Beverly Hills home. He was 91.

Anderson famously intoned the words heard in voiceover in the opening credits of “The Six Million Dollar Man”: “Gentlemen, we can rebuild him. We have the technology. We have the capability to make the world’s first bionic man. Steve Austin will be that man. Better than he was before. Better … stronger … faster.”

Anderson was one of a handful of actors who’ve played the same character simultaneously on more than one series on an ongoing basis; some actors in the “Law & Order” franchise made occasional or special appearances on another “Law  & Order” series, but were not seen regularly on more than one series.

Related »

- Carmel Dagan

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Richard Anderson, ‘Six Million Dollar Man’ and ‘Bionic Woman’ Actor, Dies at 91

31 August 2017 4:07 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Richard Anderson, who simultaneously played Oscar Goldman, leader of secret government agent the Osi, on both “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “The Bionic Woman” after a long career as a supporting actor in film and TV, died on Thursday in his Beverly Hills home. He was 91.

Anderson famously intoned the words heard in voiceover in the opening credits of “The Six Million Dollar Man”: “Gentlemen, we can rebuild him. We have the technology. We have the capability to make the world’s first bionic man. Steve Austin will be that man. Better than he was before. Better … stronger … faster.”

Anderson was one of a handful of actors who’ve played the same character simultaneously on more than one series on an ongoing basis; some actors in the “Law & Order” franchise made occasional or special appearances on another “Law  & Order” series, but were not seen regularly on more than one series.

In »

- Carmel Dagan

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The 100 Greatest Comedies of All-Time, According to BBC’s Critics Poll

22 August 2017 5:43 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

After polling critics from around the world for the greatest American films of all-time, BBC has now forged ahead in the attempt to get a consensus on the best comedies of all-time. After polling 253 film critics, including 118 women and 135 men, from 52 countries and six continents a simple, the list of the 100 greatest is now here.

Featuring canonical classics such as Some Like It Hot, Dr. Strangelove, Annie Hall, Duck Soup, Playtime, and more in the top 10, there’s some interesting observations looking at the rest of the list. Toni Erdmann is the most recent inclusion, while the highest Wes Anderson pick is The Royal Tenenbaums. There’s also a healthy dose of Chaplin and Lubitsch with four films each, and the recently departed Jerry Lewis has a pair of inclusions.

Check out the list below (and my ballot) and see more on their official site.

100. (tie) The King of Comedy (Martin Scorsese, »

- Jordan Raup

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New York City Wants Its Own Citizens to Pick Their Favorite NYC-Centric Film, From ‘Crooklyn’ to ‘Desperately Seeking Susan’

1 August 2017 7:22 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

What is the quintessential New York City film? The city’s own Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment is eager to know, and has launched a new citywide campaign — in tandem with the New York Times — to “unite New Yorkers around one great film.” The initiative, known as “One Film, One New York” is inspired by the success of its recent “One Book, One New York” campaign, which asked citizens to pick a favorite book to then “read together” as a city.

“We are thrilled to be launching this program to unite New Yorkers around one film, and provide the opportunity for all New Yorkers to watch it for free on the same night,” said Media and Entertainment Commissioner Julie Menin in an official statement. “Film has the power to bring people together and to spark a civic conversation. These five films all raise important themes in their respective genres, »

- Kate Erbland

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Volcano is Fearless Finney Showcase: L.A. Screening with Bisset in Attendance

21 July 2017 4:01 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Under the Volcano' screening: John Huston's 'quality' comeback featuring daring Albert Finney tour de force As part of its John Huston film series, the UCLA Film & Television Archive will be presenting the 1984 drama Under the Volcano, starring Albert Finney, Jacqueline Bisset, and Anthony Andrews, on July 21 at 7:30 p.m. at the Billy Wilder Theater in the Los Angeles suburb of Westwood. Jacqueline Bisset is expected to be in attendance. Huston was 77, and suffering from emphysema for several years, when he returned to Mexico – the setting of both The Treasure of the Sierra Madre and The Night of the Iguana – to direct 28-year-old newcomer Guy Gallo's adaptation of English poet and novelist Malcolm Lowry's 1947 semi-autobiographical novel Under the Volcano, which until then had reportedly defied the screenwriting abilities of numerous professionals. Appropriately set on the Day of the Dead – 1938 – in the fictitious Mexican town of Quauhnahuac (the fact that it sounds like Cuernavaca »

- Andre Soares

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More 4th of July Escapism: Small-Town Iowa and Declaration of Independence Musicals

4 July 2017 11:58 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

(See previous post: Fourth of July Movies: Escapism During a Weird Year.) On the evening of the Fourth of July, besides fireworks, fire hazards, and Yankee Doodle Dandy, if you're watching TCM in the U.S. and Canada, there's the following: Peter H. Hunt's 1776 (1972), a largely forgotten film musical based on the Broadway hit with music by Sherman Edwards. William Daniels, who was recently on TCM talking about 1776 and a couple of other movies (A Thousand Clowns, Dodsworth), has one of the key roles as John Adams. Howard Da Silva, blacklisted for over a decade after being named a communist during the House Un-American Committee hearings of the early 1950s (Robert Taylor was one who mentioned him in his testimony), plays Benjamin Franklin. Ken Howard is Thomas Jefferson, a role he would reprise in John Huston's 1976 short Independence. (In the short, Pat Hingle was cast as John Adams; Eli Wallach was Benjamin Franklin.) Warner »

- Andre Soares

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Recommended Films in Times of Madness: Singing Kidnappers and Dancing Puerto Ricans Will Make You Forget Ballistic Missiles

4 July 2017 11:36 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Fourth of July movies: A few recommended titles that should help you temporarily escape current global madness Two thousand and seventeen has been a weirder-than-usual year on the already pretty weird Planet Earth. Unsurprisingly, this Fourth of July, the day the United States celebrates its Declaration of Independence from the British Empire, has been an unusual one as well. Instead of fireworks, (at least some) people's attention has been turned to missiles – more specifically, a carefully timed North Korean intercontinental ballistic missile test indicating that Kim Jong-un could theoretically gain (or could already have?) the capacity to strike North America with nuclear weapons. Then there were right-wing trolls & history-deficient Twitter users berating National Public Radio for tweeting the Declaration of Independence, 140 characters at a time. Besides, a few days ago the current U.S. president retweeted a video of himself body-slamming and choking a representation of CNN – courtesy of a gif originally created by a far-right Internet »

- Andre Soares

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Hollywood Studios' First Gay Romantic Drama Back on the Big Screen

24 June 2017 1:03 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Making Love': Groundbreaking romantic gay drama returns to the big screen As part of its Anniversary Classics series, Laemmle Theaters will be presenting Arthur Hiller's groundbreaking 1982 romantic drama Making Love, the first U.S. movie distributed by a major studio that focused on a romantic gay relationship. Michael Ontkean, Harry Hamlin, and Kate Jackson star. The 35th Anniversary Screening of Making Love will be held on Saturday, June 24 – it's Gay Pride month, after all – at 7:30 p.m. at the Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre on Wilshire Blvd. in Beverly Hills. The movie will be followed by a Q&A session with Harry Hamlin, screenwriter Barry Sandler, and author A. Scott Berg, who wrote the “story” on which the film is based. 'Making Love' & What lies beneath In this 20th Century Fox release – Sherry Lansing was the studio head at the time – Michael Ontkean plays a »

- Andre Soares

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La La Land; Manchester By the Sea; Graduation and more – review

14 May 2017 12:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Damien Chazelle’s sun-drenched musical is even lovelier on second viewing, while Casey Affleck’s janitor evokes Brando

Stunningly losing the best picture Oscar may turn out to be the best thing that could have happened to La La Land (Lionsgate, 12), Damien Chazelle’s sun-bright, sour-sweet satsuma of a musical. Formally released from the prestige pressure bestowed by such a title, the film that inspired such a hysterical pre-Oscar backlash as to be labelled “fascist propaganda” in certain quarters of the internet can be cherished once more as the bijou beauty it is – a film out not to change the world, but to wistfully warm it up a little. Stylistically riffing on Jacques Demy and Stanley Donen with frisky magpie cheek, Chazelle’s picture is steeped in nostalgia, but not just of the gilded “they don’t make ’em like they used to” variety. Its simple, starry-eyed boy-meets-girl story deals in emotional nostalgia too, »

- Guy Lodge

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Jonathan Demme, ‘Silence of the Lambs’ Director, Dies at 73

26 April 2017 8:10 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Oscar-winning director Jonathan Demme died Wednesday in New York of cancer complications, his publicist told Variety. He was 73 years old.

Demme is best known for directing “The Silence of the Lambs,” the 1991 horror-thriller that was a box office smash, a critical triumph, and introduced moviegoers to Anthony Hopkins’ Hannibal Lecter, a charismatic serial with a yen for Chianti, fava beans, and cannibalism. The story of a novice FBI analyst (Jodie Foster) on the trail of a murderer became only the third film in history to win Academy Awards in all the top five categories ( picture, actor, actress, director, and adapted screenplay), joining the ranks of “It Happened One Night” and “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”

Though he had his greatest success terrifying audiences, most of Demme’s work was looser and quirkier. In particular, he showed a great humanism and an empathy for outsiders in the likes of “Melvin and Howard, »

- Brent Lang and Carmel Dagan

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Jack Linker

13 April 2017 1:24 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Tiff on the need for female film critics

The Guardian The Rock reveals he was turned down for the role of Jack Reacher in favor of Tom Cruise. Which puts that original quote that they couldn't find a tall enough actor to play the 6'5" fictional character to shame! (It's like when producers say "we couldn't find someone who can sing and dance for this musical"... it's just code for: 'we didn't really try because we liked Star A even though they were wrong for it' 

The Retro Set a look at Fred Astaire defying gravity in Royal Wedding for director Stanley Donen's birthday

Coming Soon after terrific 3rd season Grace & Frankie is renewed, will add Lisa Kudrow for a guest arc

/Film another disruption from Netflix. They're planning to focus more on Los Angeles as home for their productions. Might Hollywood follow suit and return home?

EW does »

- NATHANIEL R

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Singin’ In The Rain with Live Music by The St. Louis Symphony Orchestra May 13th & 14th

11 April 2017 6:23 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“She can’t act, she can’t sing, she can’t dance. A triple threat!”

Singin’ In The Rain screens with live music accompaniment by the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra May 13th & 14th at Powell Hall in St. Louis (718 N Grand Blvd)

I’ve often said there’s nothing better than watching silent movies with live music, but what about watching sound movies with live music? When the movie is Singin’ In The Rai and the score is being performed by the award-winning St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, it just becomes one of those events that can’t be missed. Two performances only May 13th at 7pm and May 14th at 3pm and 2pm Sunday March 19th. Ticket information can be found Here.

Singin’ In The Rain is part musical, part comedy, and part romance, but it is always all of these things at the same time. The story follows Don Lockwood »

- Tom Stockman

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Film Acquisition Rundown: Kino Lorber Picks Up ‘Dawson City,’ Magnolia Buys ‘Lucky‘ and More

7 April 2017 2:33 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Keep up with the wild and wooly world of indie film acquisitions with our weekly Rundown of everything that’s been picked up around the globe. Check out last week’s Rundown here.

Kino Lorber has acquired the North American rights to Bill Morrison’s “Dawson City: Frozen Time,” about the true history of a collection of 533 reels of film (representing 372 titles) dating from the 1910s to 1920s, which were lost for over 50 years until being discovered buried in a sub-arctic swimming pool deep in the Yukon Territory. The film tells the unique history of a Canadian gold rush town and how cinema, capitalism and history intersect.

“Dawson City” had its world premiere at the 73rd Venice Film Festival and North American premiere at 2016 New York Film Festival. The film also played at the BFI/London Film Festival and the 2017 Rotterdam International Film Festival, and screened Thursday at the TCM »

- Graham Winfrey

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The Magic of Jacques Demy

20 March 2017 12:52 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Taking a look at the French director’s fascinating filmography.

One of the biggest films of 2016, La La Land, owes a thing or two to French director Jacques Demy. The bright, colorful musical visually mirrors Demy’s The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964) and The Young Girls of Rochefort (1967), and director Damien Chazelle was able to capture something of the melancholic sweetness of Demy’s musicals. Demy is not one of the most famous French directors, however his films have a specific charm and intelligence that no other filmmaker could match. The way he blended Hollywood style with French culture was unlike any other filmmaker at the time.

Demy began his career in 1960s France, during the time of the “Nouvelle Vague” or French New Wave. This was the time of films such as Breathless, Jules and Jim, The 400 Blows, and Le Beau Serge. However, Demy lies a little bit outside of this group of filmmakers, and »

- Angela Morrison

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Netflix to Resurrect One of Cinema’s Lost Treasures: Orson Welles’ ‘The Other Side of the Wind’

15 March 2017 8:57 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Plus: Jordan Peele makes history, a couple new trailers, and perfect shots.~

In 1970, renowned auteur and wine lover Orson Welles began production on a film entitled The Other Side of the Wind about a legendary director who’d been in European exile for a number of years but had at last returned stateside to make his masterpiece, which bears the same name as this film. John Huston was cast as the director alongside such talents as Peter Bogdonovich, Susan Strasberg, Lili Palmer, Cameron Crowe, Dennis Hopper, Natalie Wood, and Edmond O’Brien. It was, naturally, meant to be Welles’ own comeback film, a send up of Hollywood, art, and the myriad struggles to unite the two. Shot mockumentary style over a six-year period, the film became more famous for its struggles, and even though principal photography was completed, financial and legal issues resulted in the negatives being impounded; Welles wouldn’t live to get them back.

But »

- H. Perry Horton

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Robert Osborne, TCM Host and Film Historian, Dies at 84

6 March 2017 11:00 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Film historian Robert Osborne, the effervescent primetime host of Turner Classic Movies since the cabler’s inception in 1994, has died. He was 84.

TCM’s general manager Jennifer Dorian released a statement saying, “All of us at Turner Classic Movies are deeply saddened by the death of Robert Osborne. Robert was a beloved member of the Turner family for more than 23 years. He joined us as an expert on classic film and grew to be our cherished colleague and esteemed ambassador for TCM. Robert was embraced by devoted fans who saw him as a trusted expert and friend. His calming presence, gentlemanly style, encyclopedic knowledge of film history, fervent support for film preservation and highly personal interviewing style all combined to make him a truly world-class host. Robert’s contributions were fundamental in shaping TCM into what it is today and we owe him a debt of gratitude that can never be repaid. Our »

- Carmel Dagan

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Eye Say by Anne-Katrin Titze

26 February 2017 5:01 AM, PST | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Emma Stone shines with Ryan Gosling in Damien Chazelle's La La Land Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Take the opening number from Jacques Demy's Les Demoiselles De Rochefort mixed with Federico Fellini's 8 1/2 and copy to Los Angeles. Put girls in traffic light-colored dresses that vaguely resemble those from Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly's On the Town. Add an introspective song, channeling Claudine Longet, from Blake Edwards' The Party - plus an elephant and mix in some Esther Williams underwater fun. Make a melody sound like the one given by Michel Legrand to Michel Piccoli's M Dame. Borrow from Fred Astaire: Sand Under Shoes in Mark Sandrich's Top Hat, A Fine Romance of George Stevens' Swing Time, and the lift in Charles Walters' The Belle Of New York. From Kelly: Seine dance, paintings coming to life, studio setting and It's Always Fair Weather - without the war. »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Gene Kelly and Debbie Reynolds Are Singin’ In The Rain at The Hi-Pointe This Saturday Morning

22 February 2017 9:20 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“She can’t act, she can’t sing, she can’t dance. A triple threat!”

Singin’ In The Rain screens this Saturday morning at 10:30am at the fabulous Hi-Pointe Theater (1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117). Admission is $10 and this is a fundraiser sponsored by Health Projects – St. Louis Metropolitan Medical Society Alliance, Loyola Academy – St. Louis, St. Louis University Medical School (Match Day Scholarships), and Voices of Excellence.

Singin’ In The Rain is part musical, part comedy, and part romance, but it is always all of these things at the same time. The story follows Don Lockwood (Gene Kelly), a famous silent movie star, and his friend Cosmo (Donald O’Connor) as they brace for Hollywood’s transition into the Age of Sound. This period in film history serves only as a backdrop for one of the most lavish films ever made. In addition to the comedy, what makes »

- Tom Stockman

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‘The Collection’ Review: Amazon’s Sumptuous Fashion Drama Over-Accessorizes With Intrigue and Mansplaining

10 February 2017 11:14 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“Fashion has the power to transform us. It’s not so much about who you are but who you want to be. Even those who hate fashion make a statement with what they wear, if only to say to the world, ‘I don’t give a damn.’”

Such are the wise words by fashion house owner Paul Sabine (Richard Coyle). If only Amazon‘s “The Collection” actually heeded them.

Set in Paris 1947, the atelier Paul Sabine House is tasked by a wealthy and powerful investor with restoring Paris as the haute couture capital of the world. The wartime German occupation of the city, however, has cast a long shadow, and our Parisians are having a hard time shaking off that oppression, the rationing mindset and past decisions.

Read More: Studio Ghibli’s Miyazaki — No, the Other One — On Inheriting His Father’s Legacy with ‘Ronja, the Robber’s Daughter’

The »

- Hanh Nguyen

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‘The Collection’ Review: Amazon’s Sumptuous Fashion Drama Over-Accessorizes With Intrigue and Mansplaining

10 February 2017 11:14 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

“Fashion has the power to transform us. It’s not so much about who you are but who you want to be. Even those who hate fashion make a statement with what they wear, if only to say to the world, ‘I don’t give a damn.’”

Such are the wise words by fashion house owner Paul Sabine (Richard Coyle). If only Amazon‘s “The Collection” actually heeded them.

Set in Paris 1947, the atelier Paul Sabine House is tasked by a wealthy and powerful investor with restoring Paris as the haute couture capital of the world. The wartime German occupation of the city, however, has cast a long shadow, and our Parisians are having a hard time shaking off that oppression, the rationing mindset and past decisions.

Read More: Studio Ghibli’s Miyazaki — No, the Other One — On Inheriting His Father’s Legacy with ‘Ronja, the Robber’s Daughter’

The »

- Hanh Nguyen

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 1997

1-20 of 26 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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