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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2003 | 2000 | 1992

17 items from 2015


Progressive social activist, 'The Sound of Music' Broadway Star, and Oscar-Nominated Actor Bikel Dead at 91

22 July 2015 7:36 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Theodore Bikel. Theodore Bikel dead at 91: Oscar-nominated actor and folk singer best known for stage musicals 'The Sound of Music,' 'Fiddler on the Roof' Folk singer, social and union activist, and stage, film, and television actor Theodore Bikel, best remembered for starring in the Broadway musical The Sound of Music and, throughout the U.S., in Fiddler on the Roof, died Monday morning (July 20, '15) of "natural causes" at the UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. The Austrian-born Bikel – as Theodore Meir Bikel on May 2, 1924, in Vienna, to Yiddish-speaking Eastern European parents – was 91. Fled Hitler Thanks to his well-connected Zionist father, six months after the German annexation of Austria in March 1938 ("they were greeted with jubilation by the local populace," he would recall in 2012), the 14-year-old Bikel and his family fled to Palestine, at the time a British protectorate. While there, the teenager began acting on stage, »

- Andre Soares

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Last Surviving Gwtw Star and 2-Time Oscar Winner Has Turned 99: As a Plus, She Made U.S. Labor Law History

1 July 2015 6:51 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Olivia de Havilland picture U.S. labor history-making 'Gone with the Wind' star and two-time Best Actress winner Olivia de Havilland turns 99 (This Olivia de Havilland article is currently being revised and expanded.) Two-time Best Actress Academy Award winner Olivia de Havilland, the only surviving major Gone with the Wind cast member and oldest surviving Oscar winner, is turning 99 years old today, July 1.[1] Also known for her widely publicized feud with sister Joan Fontaine and for her eight movies with Errol Flynn, de Havilland should be remembered as well for having made Hollywood labor history. This particular history has nothing to do with de Havilland's films, her two Oscars, Gone with the Wind, Joan Fontaine, or Errol Flynn. Instead, history was made as a result of a legal fight: after winning a lawsuit against Warner Bros. in the mid-'40s, Olivia de Havilland put an end to treacherous »

- Andre Soares

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The Top Father's Day Films Ever Made? Here Are Five Dads - Ranging from the Intellectual to the Pathological

22 June 2015 4:02 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Father of the Bride': Steve Martin and Kimberly Williams. Top Five Father's Day Movies? From giant Gregory Peck to tyrant John Gielgud What would be the Top Five Father's Day movies ever made? Well, there have been countless films about fathers and/or featuring fathers of various sizes, shapes, and inclinations. In terms of quality, these range from the amusing – e.g., the 1950 version of Cheaper by the Dozen; the Oscar-nominated The Grandfather – to the nauseating – e.g., the 1950 version of Father of the Bride; its atrocious sequel, Father's Little Dividend. Although I'm unable to come up with the absolute Top Five Father's Day Movies – or rather, just plain Father Movies – ever made, below are the first five (actually six, including a remake) "quality" patriarch-centered films that come to mind. Now, the fathers portrayed in these films aren't all heroic, loving, and/or saintly paternal figures. Several are »

- Andre Soares

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Oscar Nominated Moody Pt.2: From Fagin to Merlin - But No Harry Potter

19 June 2015 4:00 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Ron Moody as Fagin in 'Oliver!' based on Charles Dickens' 'Oliver Twist.' Ron Moody as Fagin in Dickens musical 'Oliver!': Box office and critical hit (See previous post: "Ron Moody: 'Oliver!' Actor, Academy Award Nominee Dead at 91.") Although British made, Oliver! turned out to be an elephantine release along the lines of – exclamation point or no – Gypsy, Star!, Hello Dolly!, and other Hollywood mega-musicals from the mid'-50s to the early '70s.[1] But however bloated and conventional the final result, and a cast whose best-known name was that of director Carol Reed's nephew, Oliver Reed, Oliver! found countless fans.[2] The mostly British production became a huge financial and critical success in the U.S. at a time when star-studded mega-musicals had become perilous – at times downright disastrous – ventures.[3] Upon the American release of Oliver! in Dec. 1968, frequently acerbic The »

- Andre Soares

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Every Best Picture Oscar Winner, Ranked From Worst to Best

6 May 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

This week marks the 10th anniversary of the release of "Crash" (on May 6, 2005), an all-star movie whose controversy came not from its provocative treatment of racial issues but from its Best Picture Oscar victory a few months later, against what many critics felt was a much more deserving movie, "Brokeback Mountain."

The "Crash" vs. "Brokeback" battle is one of those lingering disputes that makes the Academy Awards so fascinating, year after year. Moviegoers and critics who revisit older movies are constantly judging the Academy's judgment. Even decades of hindsight may not always be enough to tell whether the Oscar voters of a particular year got it right or wrong. Whether it's "Birdman" vs. "Boyhood," "The King's Speech" vs. "The Social Network," "Saving Private Ryan" vs. "Shakespeare in Love" or even "An American in Paris" vs. "A Streetcar Named Desire," we're still confirming the Academy's taste or dismissing it as hopelessly off-base years later. »

- Gary Susman

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‘An American in Paris’ Theater Review: How Much Angst Can a Movie Musical Handle?

12 April 2015 7:00 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

It was going to be a movie about two kept people who fall in love with each other. That was Alan Jay Lerner’s original concept for his “An American in Paris” screenplay. Naturally, the powers at MGM decided that one kept person was more than enough for their 1951 movie musical. Struggling painter Gene Kelly could be “supported” by art patron Nina Foch (impersonating Peggy Guggenheim), but it was just too much for Leslie Caron to be kept by her wealthy boyfriend too. Instead, Caron’s character Lise became a waif who’s indebted to the wealthy Henri Baurel for protecting. »

- Robert Hofler

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‘Murder on the Orient Express’ Reboot Sets Michael Green as Writer (Exclusive)

10 March 2015 7:01 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Michael Green is taking a trip on the Orient Express, coming on board to write Fox’s remake of Sidney Lumet’s 1974 detective drama “Murder on the Orient Express.”

Variety reported in late 2013 that the studio was developing the project with Ridley Scott, Mark Gordon and Simon Kinberg on board to produce. No director is attached.

Murder on the Orient Express,” based on the 1934 novel by Agatha Christie, starred Albert Finney as the genius Belgian detective Hercule Poirot investigating the murder of an American tycoon aboard the train. The all-star cast of suspects were portrayed by Lauren Bacall, Ingrid Bergman, Jacqueline Bisset, Colin Blakely, Sean Connery, John Gielgud, Anthony Perkins, Vanessa Redgrave and Michael York.

Orient Express” was a commercial success with $35 million in U.S. grosses. It was also nominated for six Academy Awards, with Bergman — portraying a Swedish missionary — winning her third Oscar, her first in the supporting category. »

- Dave McNary

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Starmaker Allégret: From Gay Romance with 'Uncle' (and Nobel Winner) Gide to Simon's Movie Mentor

27 February 2015 9:46 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Marc Allégret: From André Gide lover to Simone Simon mentor (photo: Marc Allégret) (See previous post: "Simone Simon Remembered: Sex Kitten and Femme Fatale.") Simone Simon became a film star following the international critical and financial success of the 1934 romantic drama Lac aux Dames, directed by her self-appointed mentor – and alleged lover – Marc Allégret.[1] The son of an evangelical missionary, Marc Allégret (born on December 22, 1900, in Basel, Switzerland) was to have become a lawyer. At age 16, his life took a different path as a result of his romantic involvement – and elopement to London – with his mentor and later "adoptive uncle" André Gide (1947 Nobel Prize winner in Literature), more than 30 years his senior and married to Madeleine Rondeaux for more than two decades. In various forms – including a threesome with painter Théo Van Rysselberghe's daughter Elisabeth – the Allégret-Gide relationship remained steady until the late '20s and their trip to »

- Andre Soares

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Obit: Why Louis Jourdan Endures

17 February 2015 11:20 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Jourdan was the last of the dashing Continental lovers – sophisticated, rich and elegantly handsome – who delighted movie audiences during Hollywood’s golden age.  Like Jourdan, they were usually French, personified by Charles Boyer and Maurice Chevalier. In his most famous screen role, the 1958 MGM musical “Gigi,” he was the nephew of Chevalier, an elderly roué.  In the film Jourdan was scheduled to live the same life of rich food, elegant vacations and serial mistresses as his uncle until he fell in love with Gigi (Leslie Caron) who was being groomed to become a courtesan.  The movie was a fairy tale that Jourdan carried with an easy charm. After Jourdan had played a dozen or more of such roles – as a playboy in Max Ophul’s classic “Letter From an Unknown Woman” (1948) who cannot remember a woman who was the mother of his child; as one of “Madame Bovary’s” lovers »

- Aljean Harmetz

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Louis Jourdan obituary

15 February 2015 3:15 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

French film actor who found stardom with Three Coins in the Fountain and Gigi, and whose later roles included a villain in the James Bond movie Octopussy

For audiences in the 1940s and 50s, Louis Jourdan’s incredible good looks and mellifluous Gallic purr seemed to sum up everything that was sexy and enticing about Frenchmen. As a result, he became the most sought-after French actor since Charles Boyer. Though perhaps this hampered him, stymying opportunities to extend his dramatic range, any actor who was constantly in demand by both French studios and Hollywood producers had a lot to be grateful for.

When Jourdan, who has died aged 93, played the consummate bon vivant in Vincente Minnelli’s Gigi (1958), he became an international celebrity. The film, which co-starred Maurice Chevalier and Leslie Caron, won nine Oscars, including best picture. Though the best-known of its Lerner and Loewe numbers was Chevalier’s Thank Heaven for Little Girls, »

- Michael Freedland

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Louis Jourdan Has Died, Star of Gigi Was 93

15 February 2015 1:35 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Hollywood has had many quintessential young Englishmen, but from the late 1940s through the early '60s, there was only one quintessential young Frenchman: Louis Jourdan. The star of the 1958 Best Picture Oscar winner, Gigi, whose film roles also included those in Madame Bovary, Three Coins in the Fountain, The Swan, The V.I.P.S and Can-Can, Jourdan died Saturday at his home in Beverly Hills, reports Variety. He was 93. As was told in a 1985 People profile, Jourdan - real name Gendre - and his two brothers grew up in the South of France, where their parents managed hotels in Cannes, Nice and Marseilles. »

- Stephen M. Silverman, @stephenmsilverm

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Louis Jourdan, Star of 'Gigi' and 'Octopussy,' Dies at 93

15 February 2015 1:05 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Louis Jourdan, the debonair leading man who romanced Leslie Caron in Gigi and played a wealthy Afghan prince in the James Bond film Octopussy, has died. He was 93. The French actor, who brought his smooth, continental charm to such films as Letters From an Unknown Woman (1948), The Happy Time (1952) and Three Coins in the Fountain (1954), died Saturday in his Beverly Hills home, according to French publication Le Point. After World War II, Jourdan attracted the attention of famed producer David O. Selznick and was cast in Alfred Hitchcock’s The Paradine Case (1947), which starred Gregory Peck and

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- Duane Byrge

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Louis Jourdan, Star of ‘Octopussy,’ ‘Gigi,’ Dies at 93

15 February 2015 12:30 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Louis Jourdan, who crafted a Hollywood acting career in the footsteps of fellow dapper Frenchmen Maurice Chevalier and Charles Boyer and is best remembered for the musical “Gigi” and as the villain in James Bond pic “Octopussy,” has died at 93. According to his friend and biographer Olivier Minne, he died Saturday at his home in Beverly Hills.

Jourdan offered a certain effortless charm that worked equally well in light heroic roles and more sinister ones.

“He was the last French figure of the Hollywood golden age. And he worked with so many of the greatest actors and directors,” said Minne, who is working on a documentary and a book about Jourdan.

In Vincente Minnelli’s 1958 musical confection “Gigi,” Jourdan starred with Leslie Caron and Chevalier in an effort from the “My Fair Lady” team of Lerner & Loewe, turning the Collette tale into a Frenchified version of “Pygmalion.” The New York Times said, »

- Carmel Dagan

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Louis Jourdan, Star of ‘Octopussy,’ ‘Gigi,’ Dies at 93

15 February 2015 12:30 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Louis Jourdan, who crafted a Hollywood acting career in the footsteps of fellow dapper Frenchmen Maurice Chevalier and Charles Boyer and is best remembered for the musical “Gigi” and as the villain in James Bond pic “Octopussy,” has died at 93. According to his friend and biographer Olivier Minne, he died Saturday at his home in Beverly Hills.

Jourdan offered a certain effortless charm that worked equally well in light heroic roles and more sinister ones.

“He was the last French figure of the Hollywood golden age. And he worked with so many of the greatest actors and directors,” said Minne, who is working on a documentary and a book about Jourdan.

In Vincente Minnelli’s 1958 musical confection “Gigi,” Jourdan starred with Leslie Caron and Chevalier in an effort from the “My Fair Lady” team of Lerner & Loewe, turning the Collette tale into a Frenchified version of “Pygmalion.” The New York Times said, »

- Carmel Dagan

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Remembering Actress Simon Part 2 - Deadly Sex Kitten Romanced Real-Life James Bond 'Inspiration'

5 February 2015 7:53 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Simone Simon in 'La Bête Humaine' 1938: Jean Renoir's film noir (photo: Jean Gabin and Simone Simon in 'La Bête Humaine') (See previous post: "'Cat People' 1942 Actress Simone Simon Remembered.") In the late 1930s, with her Hollywood career stalled while facing competition at 20th Century-Fox from another French import, Annabella (later Tyrone Power's wife), Simone Simon returned to France. Once there, she reestablished herself as an actress to be reckoned with in Jean Renoir's La Bête Humaine. An updated version of Émile Zola's 1890 novel, La Bête Humaine is enveloped in a dark, brooding atmosphere not uncommon in pre-World War II French films. Known for their "poetic realism," examples from that era include Renoir's own The Lower Depths (1936), Julien Duvivier's La Belle Équipe (1936) and Pépé le Moko (1937), and particularly Marcel Carné's Port of Shadows (1938) and Daybreak (1939).[11] This thematic and »

- Andre Soares

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Thank heaven for Leslie Caron: Why not an honorary Oscar?

4 February 2015 4:00 PM, PST | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

Nancy Lindemeyer, the editor of Victoria magazine and a one-time colleague of Gold Derby founder Tom O'Neil, makes a compelling case for the academy to honor Leslie Caron. Below: her words: Gene Kelly's enthusiasm for a young dancer to star with him in "An American in Paris" gave the world a treasure. Thank heaven for the young dancer who became one of our great actresses -- twice nominated for Academy Awards. Once for the enchanting performance of "Lili" and then for the purely dramatic and heart wrenching portrayal of a pregnant woman in "The L-Shaped Room." The latter brought her the top British acting award. It was a brave step in more than one way. Working against type, she disrupted the image that had brought her commercial success.  -Break- Leslie Caron once told me her dilemma. "The French think I am American, and Americans think I am French." Both are actually right. »

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Vanessa Hudgens Sails Into Broadway’s Neil Simon Theatre As Sting Departs

14 January 2015 2:16 PM, PST | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Thank heaven for not-so-little girls. A revival of the Alan Jay Lerner/Frederick Loewe musical Gigi, starring Disney-minted and Spring Breakers starlet Vanessa Hudgens, has booked the Neil Simon Theatre and will begin previews on March 19, with an official opening on April 8. The theater became available when the producers of The Last Ship announced that the Sting musical would trim its sails as of January 24.

The revival of the musical by the team behind My Fair Lady and Camelot will begin its out-of-town tryout this weekend at the Kennedy Center in Washington, where it runs through February 12. The show, based on the novel by Collette about a young Parisian girl who is being groomed for life as a courtesan, will feature a new book (Lerner wrote the original) by UK writer Heidi Thomas.

The director is Eric Schaeffer and the choreographer is Emmy-winner Joshua Bergasse (Smash, the current Broadway revival of On The Town. »

- Jeremy Gerard

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2003 | 2000 | 1992

17 items from 2015


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