Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 1992

13 items from 2015


Off The Shelf – Episode 54 – New Releases For The Week Of Tuesday, June 16th 2015

17 June 2015 5:00 AM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

This week on Off The Shelf, Ryan is joined by Brian Saur to take a look at the new DVD and Blu-ray releases for the week of June 16th, 2015, and chat about some follow-up and home video news.

Subscribe in iTunes or RSS.

Episode Links & Notes Follow-up Unopened movies Christopher Lee News Thunderbean: Willie Whopper Blu-ray Pre-order Criterion September Line-up Scream Factory to release Army Of Darkness, Demon Knight and Bordello of Blood Arrow Video: Zardoz, The Mutilator, Requiescant, The Firemen’s Ball, Closely Watched Trains, Hard To Be A God, Society Masters Of Cinema / Eureka: The Skull Warner Bros. Hammer Horror Blu-ray Box Set Warner Bros Special Effects Boxset (Them!, The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, Son of Kong, Mighty Joe Young) Sony to release The Last Dragon on Blu-ray Scorpion: Burn Witch Burn Kino Cartoon Classics Announced Kl Studio Classics F/X 2 and The Challenge Universal to put out »

- Ryan Gallagher

Permalink | Report a problem


Daily | Goings On | Bakers and Misfits

15 June 2015 1:22 PM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

For the New Inquiry, Brandon Harris reviews the current production in New York of Annie Baker’s Pulitzer-winning play The Flick, which "resembles the slow cinema of Chantal Akerman or Pedro Costa as much as it does a traditional theatrical experience." In July, Sean Baker will be in the city for screenings of Prince of Broadway, Starlet and Tangerine. Chicago is mounting a formal-wear screening of the rediscovered and restored Essanay production of Sherlock Holmes (1916). The Reader recommends Lisandro Alonso's Jauja. Plus, a special trailer for Gerald Kargl's Angst (1983), screening tonight and tomorrow in Los Angeles. » - David Hudson »

Permalink | Report a problem


Daily | Jean Gruault, 1924 – 2015

9 June 2015 6:47 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Jean Gruault, who wrote 25 screenplays between 1960 and 1995, has His screenplay for Alain Renais's Mon oncle d'Amérique (1980) was nominated for an Oscar and a César and won a David di Donatello Award. Other notable works include Jacques Rivette's debut feature, Paris Belongs to Us (1960), and Rivette's The Nun (1966); Roberto Rossellini's Vanina Vanini (1961) and The Taking of Power by Louis Xiv (1966); Jules and Jim (1962), co-written with François Truffaut, as well as Truffaut's The Wild Child (1970), Two English Girls (1971) and The Green Room (1978); Jean-Luc Godard's Les carabiniers (1963); Chantal Akerman's The Eighties (1983) and Golden Eighties (1986); the scenario for Resnais's Love Unto Death (1984); and he worked with Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne on You're on My Mind (1992). » - David Hudson »

Permalink | Report a problem


What’s Up Doc?: Sheffield & AFI Docs Signal the Summer Fest Drought

1 June 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Well folks, after a rather long and brutal winter (at least for me here in Buffalo), we are finally heading into the wonderful warmth of summer, but with that blast of sunshine and steamy humidity comes the mid-year drought of major film fests. After the Sheffield Doc/Fest concludes on June 10th and AFI Docs wraps on June 21st, we likely won’t see any major influx in our charts until Locarno, Venice, Telluride and Tiff announce their line-ups in rapid succession. In the meantime, we can look forward to the intriguing onslaught of films making their debut in Sheffield, including Brian Hill’s intriguing examination of Sweden’s most notorious serial killer, The Confessions of Thomas Quick, and Sean McAllister’s film for which he himself was jailed in the process of making, A Syrian Love Story, the only two films world premiering in the festival’s main competition. »

- Jordan M. Smith

Permalink | Report a problem


What’s Up Doc?: Kent Jones, Asif Kapadia & Luc Jacquet Head to Cannes

1 May 2015 8:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

It should come as no surprise that Cannes Film Festival will play host to Kent Jones’s doc on the touchstone of filmmaking interview tomes, Hitchcock/Truffaut (see photo above). The film has been floating near the top of this list since it was announced last year as in development, while Jones himself has a history with the festival, having co-written both Arnaud Desplechin’s Jimmy P. and Martin Scorsese’s My Voyage To Italy, both of which premiered in Cannes. The film is scheduled to screen as part of the Cannes Classics sidebar alongside the likes of Stig Björkman’s Ingrid Bergman, in Her Own Words, which will play as part of the festival’s tribute to the late starlet, and Gabriel Clarke and John McKenna’s Steve McQueen: The Man & Le Mans (see trailer below). As someone who grew up watching road races with my dad in Watkins Glen, »

- Jordan M. Smith

Permalink | Report a problem


Daily | Hot Docs 2015

25 April 2015 8:23 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Hot Docs is on in Toronto through May 3, screening 210 documentaries, many of them world premieres, but more than a few classics as well: Chantal Akerman’s News from Home, Roger Graef's Pleasure at Her Majesty's, five films by Carole Laganière, another six by Patricio Guzmán and so on. The Hollywood Reporter notes that Hot Docs "has implemented strict security measures for next week's world premiere of U.S. gay Muslim director Parvez Sharma's latest film, A Sinner in Mecca." Sheri Linden calls David Shapiro's Missing People "intimate, gripping and sharply observed." Plus a clip from Søren Steen Jespersen and Nasib Farah's Warriors of the North, Vr and more. » - David Hudson »

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscar-winners join EU copyright plans protest

26 March 2015 4:38 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The Artist’ director Michel Hazanavicius leads call against the creation of a Digital Single Market

Three Academy Award winners ­– Michel Hazanavicius (The Artist), Volker Schlöndorff (The Tin Drum) and Danis Tanovic (No Man’s Land) ­– are among 20 film-makers joining the protest against the European Commission’s plans to reform copyright law.

In their statement, also signed by Chantal Akerman, Luc Dardenne, Costa-Gavras, Jaco van Dormael and Julie Bertuccelli, they declared: “We are Europeans who still hear the echo of [European Commission] President Juncker saying that he would never accept creators being ‘treated like plastic manufacturers’, but now his College compare our work with selling a car or a tie.”

“We are Europeans shocked to hear of ‘breaking down national silos in copyright’, yet nothing to condemn ongoing violations of copyright, which hinder the development of online legal services.”

Commission declares backing for Digital Single Market

The film-makers’ joint declaration was issued ahead of the first debate held by the »

- screen.berlin@googlemail.com (Martin Blaney)

Permalink | Report a problem


What’s Up Doc?: Les Blank, Alex Gibney & Alex Winter Lead SXSW Charge (February 2015)

27 February 2015 3:00 PM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Now that the busy winter fest schedule of Sundance, Rotterdam and the Berlinale has concluded, we’ve now got our eyes on the likes of True/False and SXSW. While, True/False does not specialize in attention grabbing world premieres, it does provide a late winter haven for cream of the crop non-fiction fare from all the previously mentioned fests and a selection of overlooked genre blending films presented in a down home setting. This year will mark my first trip to the Columbia, Missouri based fest, where I hope to catch a little of everything, from their hush-hush secret screenings, to selections from their Neither/Nor series, this year featuring chimeric Polish cinema of decades past, to a spotlight of Adam Curtis’s incisive oeuvre. But truth be told, it is SXSW, with its slew of high profile world premieres being announced, such as Alex Gibney’s Steve Jobs »

- Jordan M. Smith

Permalink | Report a problem


Martin Scorsese's 39 Foreign Films to See Before You Die

25 February 2015 10:11 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

An oldie, but a goodie. Open Culture resurfaced this list (below) sent from director Martin Scorsese to a budding young filmmaker. Let's appraise it. Italian directors are well-represented but this list needs some Bertolucci ("The Conformist," for one, though his early "Before the Revolution" makes the cut) and Pasolini ("Salo" or "Teorema" for weaker stomachs). What about Antonioni's "L'eclisse"? The last ten minutes or so, when neither Alain Delon or Monica Vitti show up for their appointed date at a water fountain, are a formally radical must-have for aspiring directors. And no Fellini? Bergman? Come on Marty. There's a real dearth of women on here. Where's Chantal Akerman, director of the mind-blowing "Jeanne Dielman"? Or Agnes Varda, whose "Cleo From 5 to 7" and others have inspired innumerable present-day indie filmmakers. Scorsese seems to be limiting himself to two films per director -- though Godard (why »

- Ryan Lattanzio

Permalink | Report a problem


Berlin Film Review: ‘Queen of Earth’

7 February 2015 10:45 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

If Alex Ross Perry’s previous film, “Listen Up Philip,” aspired to the kaleidoscopic narrative density of a John Fowles or William Gaddis, his new “Queen of Earth” carries the spiky intensity and tart aftertaste of a John Cheever short story, as it observes the psychological breakdown of a young woman coping (badly) with a series of abrupt life changes. An unnerving, acidly funny work that fosters an acute air of dread without ever fully announcing itself as a horror movie, Perry’s fourth feature may unfold on a smaller canvas than the expansive “Philip,” but is every bit as sure of what it wants to do and how to get there, built around an utterly fearless central performance by Elisabeth Moss. Audiences who found Perry’s earlier work misanthropic won’t want to touch “Queen” with a 10-foot pole, but heartier souls — and connoisseurs of uncompromising auteur cinema — should rise to the occasion. »

- Scott Foundas

Permalink | Report a problem


Sign Language Film ‘The Tribe’ Features In 44th New Directors/New Films Series

21 January 2015 10:00 AM, PST | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

The Museum Of Modern Art and the Film Society Of Lincoln Center announced the first nine films in the long-lived showcase for new work. They include Myroslav Slaboshpytskiy’s winner of the Critics’ Week grand prize at Cannes, which is set in a Ukrainian school for deaf and mute coeds and is told entirely in sign language, with no subtitles. The Tribe is one of four films that will make their way to Manhattan from Park City, Utah, where they’re also on the Sundance roster: Charles Poekel’s Christmas, Again, about a heartbroken Christmas-tree salesman; Rick Alverson’s Entertainment, a follow-up to The Comedy, about a broken-down comedian doing stand-up across the Mojave Desert and Kornél Mundruczó’s White God, winner of the Un Certain Regard prize at Cannes about a dog’s journey back to its owner after being abandoned in the city.

Representing 11 countries from around the world, »

- The Deadline Team

Permalink | Report a problem


Béla Tarr’s "Repulsion": Fragments of a Lost Remake

12 January 2015 5:18 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The fifth entry in an on-going series of audiovisual essays by Cristina Álvarez López and Adrian Martin.

***

Inside every narrative film is a non-narrative film struggling to get out. A film of details, of in-betweens, of atmospheres; of nothing-much-happening and everyday banality. A film of redundant repetition and obligatory scene-setting. A film where glances fall into the void rather than guiding a drama; where gestures and actions happen for their own sakes rather than for the symbolic or thematic meaning they project. A film where the background surges forward and becomes the foreground; where rooms and objects for once really do become (as that lousy reviewing cliché loves to say) ‘characters in their own right.’

A film without intrigue. Or, at any rate, only the most minimal filigree of intrigue, perhaps a single turning point or shock. In their great and too-little-known 1998 book To Dress a Nude: Exercises in Imagination, »

- Cristina Álvarez López & Adrian Martin

Permalink | Report a problem


Notebook's 7th Writers Poll: Fantasy Double Features of 2014

5 January 2015 10:08 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

How would you program this year's newest, most interesting films into double features with movies of the past you saw in 2014?

Looking back over the year at what films moved and impressed us, it is clear that watching old films is a crucial part of making new films meaningful. Thus, the annual tradition of our end of year poll, which calls upon our writers to pick both a new and an old film: they were challenged to choose a new film they saw in 2014—in theatres or at a festival—and creatively pair it with an old film they also saw in 2014 to create a unique double feature.

All the contributors were given the option to write some text explaining their 2014 fantasy double feature. What's more, each writer was given the option to list more pairings, with or without explanation, as further imaginative film programming we'd be lucky to catch »

- Notebook

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 1992

13 items from 2015


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners