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1-20 of 69 items from 2010   « Prev | Next »


Stephen Pitt-Chambers obituary

19 December 2010 10:20 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Stephen Pitt-Chambers was driving past a pig farm near Huntingdon soon after leaving Marlborough college when his father told him that he could be a labourer, a lord, or whatever he wanted. He decided on the third option and became a trainee journalist with the local paper, the Hunts Post.

After completing his indentures, he took a job on the Peterborough Evening Telegraph and became the kind of reporter who liked to ruffle the opposition's feathers. After moving out of the newsroom and on to the subs' table, Chambers, who has died of kidney cancer aged 61, arrived in 1972 at the Bristol Evening Post, a well-known training ground for those aiming for Fleet Street. The Daily Telegraph duly beckoned, where he stood out as someone to be groomed for higher things.

In the late 1970s, Chambers decided that television was the future. In 1977 he was offered a job with ITN News. »

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Owf Oscars 1999 – Saving Private Ryan Wins Best Picture

17 December 2010 6:32 PM, PST | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

We’ve been asking you all week to vote for your Oscar picks from the year 1999, twelve years on as we retrospectively take a look back at all the Academy Award ceremonies in the 1990′s to see if time has been kind to the winners and losers.

28 of you voted, a little less than the amount who voted last time (which I think is to do with the problems with the form as we had a few complaints, I will try and fix this for next time) including a handful of Owf writers, who have collectively, like Dr. Sam Beckett in Quantum Leap, gone back in time to ‘put things right, that once went wrong’.

The number in brackets is the amount of points that film/actor/director gained (that system is explained here). Let’s take a look at the winners, shall we?

1999 Owf Awards Best Picture – Saving Private Ryan »

- Matt Holmes

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30 Greatest Gay Actors #12: Sir Ian McKellen

13 December 2010 11:46 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Long considered to be one of the greatest British stage actors of all time and arguably the finest Shakespearean actor of his generation, Sir Ian McKellen has received a Tony Award and two Academy Award nominations. Over the course of his distinguished career on the British stage, he has also received the prestigious Olivier Award five times, and in 1981 received the Tony Award for his portrayal of Mozart’s nemesis Salieri in the Broadway production of Peter Shaffer’s Amadeus. Although he is certainly not the first gay British subject to be knighted by his monarch, he is nonetheless the first to receive the honour after making a public acknowledgement of his homosexuality.

In 1988, McKellen took a brave personal step when he was being interviewed on BBC radio by conservative host Peregrine Worsthorne. While McKellen had quietly lived a gay life for many years, he

came out during the course »

- Ricky

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Splice, and the B-movie monster for the 21st century

1 December 2010 1:33 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

To celebrate the release of Splice on DVD and Blu-ray, Ryan salutes Dren, a B-movie monster for the 21st century…

Cinema is filled with mad professors and hubristic doctors meddling with nature's natural course, and while James Whale's classic adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is anything but a B-movie, it undoubtedly set the template for the decades of rampaging monsters of science that followed.

From the oddly beautiful cyborg created by the crazed scientist/master of the occult Rotwang in Fritz Lang's Metropolis, to the beast men of 1996's The Island Of Doctor Moreau and beyond, generations of mad doctors have been playing God for our viewing pleasure.

David Cronenberg was undoubtedly one of the finest directors of 'science out of control' movies, and his early work was filled with unnerving creatures and experiments gone terribly wrong. See the disease-spreading parasites of Shivers (1975), the blood-sucking, disease-spreading armpit »

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Back to Basics with Universal Studios

16 November 2010 5:29 PM, PST | Planet Fury | See recent Planet Fury news »

Over the last few weeks, we've been going "Back to Basics" by looking at the horror films produced by Universal Studios. After my previous post, I realized that before we dive into anymore of the horrors created for us by Universal, I really should set the stage and provide a little background information on the studio itself. We'll be looking at James Whale's 1935 masterwork, Bride of Frankenstein, next. But, until then, let's go back and take a look at where it all began.

Before there was Universal Studios, there was Carl Laemmle. Laemmle was born in 1867 and emigrated with his family from Germany to the United States in 1884. Soon after he arrived, Laemmle became entranced with a wondrous new technology and art form: moving pictures. At that time, nickelodeons were all the rage, and Laemmle was so mesmerized by motion pictures that he soon left behind his bookkeeping career »

- Theron

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DVD Review: The Magician (1926)

15 November 2010 5:00 AM, PST | FamousMonsters of Filmland | See recent Famous Monsters of Filmland news »

Francis Ford Coppola wasn’t around to give writer W. Somerset Maugham his father’s famous advice about “stealing” from the best to create your own art, but mystic Aleister Crowley accused the British author of doing just that after he read Maugham’s 1908 novel, The Magician. Maybe it was just sour grapes—seeing as how Maugham’s fantasy-terror tale was said to be inspired in part by Crowley’s life—but in Maugham’s story of a mad medical student who dabbles in the occult secrets of creating life (not to mention unnecessary surgery), Crowley saw elements he felt were directly lifted variously from Rosenroth’s Kabbalah Unveiled, as well as a book about 16th-century physician/alchemist Paracelsus and H.G. Wells’ man-beast classic The Island of Dr. Moreau.

Sounds like that could be a great movie? Not only has the obscure 1926 silent thriller made from Maugham’s book, produced and directed by Rex Ingram, »

- Movies Unlimited

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Skyline review

12 November 2010 7:05 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Skyline is the latest movie from the directors of Aliens Vs Predator: Requiem. What could possibly go wrong? Here’s our review…

If nothing else, the brothers Strause should be commended for their sheer audacity. Despite a comparatively tiny budget, they’ve attempted to make an alien invasion movie on the scale of Independence Day.

After the debacle that was Aliens Vs Predator: Requiem, it’s fair to say that expectations were fairly low for Skyline. That is, until the first trailers appeared, which displayed a few neat visual ideas that suggested that their independently made sci-fi movie might be worth watching after all.

In a film that cost less than $500,000 to produce (the rest of the movie’s $10-20 million budget was blown on computer effects), it’s unsurprising that Skyline finds novel ways to keep costs down. Its handful of characters spend much of the film hiding in a flat, »

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Back to Basics with 'The Invisible Man'

9 November 2010 3:45 PM, PST | Planet Fury | See recent Planet Fury news »

By 1933, Universal Studios had become a veritable fear factory, thanks to the efforts of production head Carl Laemmle Jr. After the amazing profits earned from Dracula, Frankenstein and The Mummy, he was eager to find Universal's next horror property, and fast.

Carl Junior had been trying to get a Frankenstein sequel off the ground, but director James Whale, who had been so instrumental to the original film's success, had been resistant to the idea. Whale was a true artist who did not like to repeat himself, so the idea of a sequel was distasteful at best, even if it was guaranteed to be a hit.

In an effort to mollify Carl Junior and satisfy his desire for something in the realm of the fantastic, Whale expressed interest in filming The Invisible Man, based on H. G. Wells' 1897 sci-fi novella. It presented some special challenges and was just different enough from »

- Theron

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'Bride of Frankenstein' Poster Expected to Fetch Record Bid

8 November 2010 5:12 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

This coming Friday, Heritage Auctions will be selling a teaser poster for James Whale's 1935 film "The Bride of Frankenstein" that is expected to sell for $700,000, making it the most expensive movie poster in history. The current record is held by a poster for Fritz Lang's 1927 silent film "Metropolis," which sold for $690,000 in 2005. The extremely rare red poster was designed by an unknown hand and is the only one of its kind. "The Bride of Frankenstein" starred Boris Karloff as the famed monster, and Elsa Lanchester as the title »

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A brief history of the alien invasion movie

1 November 2010 10:06 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

As the Strause Brothers’ Skyline prepares to take over cinemas, we take a look back at the 50s era of classic alien invasion films…

Looking back over the history of science fiction cinema, it's fascinating to note just how long it took aliens to invade the big screen. Hg Wells' The War Of The Worlds popularised the alien invasion subgenre in 1897, but it would be more than 50 years before an adaptation made it to the big screen.

Before the 1950s, sci-fi cinema was dominated by mad scientists and monsters on the rampage, from James Whale's 1931 classic Frankenstein to Ernest B. Schoedsack's brilliantly odd Dr. Cyclops (1940), in which a mad professor shrinks a group of explorers using radiation.

It took the post-war paranoia of the Cold War to usher in a golden age of sci-fi, and with it, a rash of alien invasion movies. These invasions came in many forms, »

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Where Everyone Has Gone Before #16: 'Bride of Frankenstein'

30 October 2010 10:05 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Filed under: Halloween, Horror, Cinematical

Welcome to Where Everyone Has Gone Before, the column in which I continue my film education before your very eyes by seeking out and watching all of the movies we all know I should have seen by now. I will first judge the movie before I've watched it, based entirely on its reputation (and my potentially misguided thoughts). Then I will give the movie a fair chance and actually watch it. You will laugh at me, you may condemn me, but you will never say I didn't try!

The Film: 'Bride of Frankenstein' (1935), Dir. James Whale

Starring: Boris "?????" Karloff, Colin "It's Alive!" Clive, Ernest Thesiger and Valerie Hobson.

Why I Haven't Seen It Until Now: When I was but a fresh-faced youth with his whole life still in front of him, a certain cable channel that shall not be named would run marathons »

- Jacob Hall

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Where Everyone Has Gone Before #16: 'Bride of Frankenstein'

30 October 2010 10:05 AM, PDT | Cinematical | See recent Cinematical news »

Filed under: Halloween, Horror, Cinematical

Welcome to Where Everyone Has Gone Before, the column in which I continue my film education before your very eyes by seeking out and watching all of the movies we all know I should have seen by now. I will first judge the movie before I've watched it, based entirely on its reputation (and my potentially misguided thoughts). Then I will give the movie a fair chance and actually watch it. You will laugh at me, you may condemn me, but you will never say I didn't try!

The Film: 'Bride of Frankenstein' (1935), Dir. James Whale

Starring: Boris "?????" Karloff, Colin "It's Alive!" Clive, Ernest Thesiger and Valerie Hobson.

Why I Haven't Seen It Until Now: When I was but a fresh-faced youth with his whole life still in front of him, a certain cable channel that shall not be named would run marathons »

- Jacob Hall

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Back to Basics with 'Frankenstein'

25 October 2010 4:02 PM, PDT | Planet Fury | See recent Planet Fury news »

When Universal Studios released Dracula in February 1931, all involved were a bit nervous.

The studio's adaptation of Hamilton Deane and John L. Balderston's play, loosely based on Bram Stoker's novel, was a gamble. Was the public ready for a horror movie - and one with sound, no less - intimating that Evil was alive and well in their world? Would people pay to have the moral order of the universe upended as an evening's entertainment? You bet they would!

Just a few months after Dracula killed at the box office, Universal's head of production, Carl Laemmle Jr., convinced his dad, studio head Carl Laemmle, to begin production on another horror flick. The property they chose to film was another play based on a classic of horror literature. Peggy Webling's Frankenstein, a stage adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, was first produced in 1927 and »

- Theron

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Mark Gatiss: Rocket man

11 October 2010 1:30 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Having had the TV hit of the summer with Sherlock, Mark Gatiss is now bringing cult horror to the masses – and putting Edwardians on the moon. Stuart Jeffries meets a shooting star

'When I was a boy," says Mark Gatiss, "I wanted to be a whiskery man in a white coat saying, 'Look, it's a pterodactyl!'" He elaborates, mentioning one of his film heroes, who died earlier this year: "I wanted to be Lionel Jeffries in an Edwardian-set family fantasy film."

Gatiss, now 43, has his wish. He's playing Edwardian inventor Joseph Cavor in his own defiantly kidultish adaptation of Hg Wells's 1901 novel The First Men in the Moon. Cavor is white-coated, facially hirsute and occasionally ditsy. Just before they set off for the moon, fellow astronaut Arnold Bedford inquires: "I say, Cavor, we will be able to get back, won't we?"

"I don't see why not," says Cavor vaguely. »

- Stuart Jeffries

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Mark Gatiss: Rocket man

11 October 2010 1:30 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Having had the TV hit of the summer with Sherlock, Mark Gatiss is now bringing cult horror to the masses – and putting Edwardians on the moon. Stuart Jeffries meets a shooting star

'When I was a boy," says Mark Gatiss, "I wanted to be a whiskery man in a white coat saying, 'Look, it's a pterodactyl!'" He elaborates, mentioning one of his film heroes, who died earlier this year: "I wanted to be Lionel Jeffries in an Edwardian-set family fantasy film."

Gatiss, now 43, has his wish. He's playing Edwardian inventor Joseph Cavor in his own defiantly kidultish adaptation of Hg Wells's 1901 novel The First Men in the Moon. Cavor is white-coated, facially hirsute and occasionally ditsy. Just before they set off for the moon, fellow astronaut Arnold Bedford inquires: "I say, Cavor, we will be able to get back, won't we?"

"I don't see why not," says Cavor vaguely. »

- Stuart Jeffries

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Wild Britain With Ray Mears | Spooks | A History of Horror With Mark Gatiss | Whitechapel | Tonight's TV highlights

10 October 2010 10:44 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Wild Britain With Ray Mears | Spooks | A History of Horror With Mark Gatiss | Whitechapel

Wild Britain With Ray Mears

8pm, ITV1

The survival expert heads off to various British nature spots to scrabble around in search of history and wildlife, and in this opening episode he's in the Forest of Dean in Gloucestershire. Originally protected as a royal hunting reserve in the 11th century, the Forest once ran amuck with wild boar. Then, 300 years ago, the last one died. Now they have been reintroduced. Mears spots a handful of them, with their piglets, on a foraging trip for the ingredients for a wild salad – but stops short of adding boar to his dinner.

Spooks

9pm, BBC1

After last week's disappointing episode, Spooks gets back on track with the tale of what happens when a Chinese snatch team arrives in London. Naturally, it's all rather complicated, principally because Section D haven't »

- Will Hodgkinson, Jonathan Wright, Phelim O'Neill, Ali Catterall, Will Dean

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MovieRetriever's 100 Greatest Movies: #97 Frankenstein

7 October 2010 1:51 PM, PDT | CinemaNerdz | See recent CinemaNerdz news »

Oct 07, 2010

James Whale's 1931 version of Frankenstein remains a cinema miracle that defies time. Some 50 years since its premiere, its sensitive craftsmanship and relentlessly macabre tone still set horror movie standards, even after decades of noisome parodies and splatterfilm overkill.

Whale treats his protagonist's obsession with galvanizing life from sewn corpses as a stark and shadowy moral tale, more in keeping with the German Expressionist influence of Robert Wiene's Caligari than Mary Shelley's Gothic overtones. Though heavy on dialogue in the beginning, Frankenstein unfolds as an intensely visual nightmare, a sleepwalker's journey along hideous graveyards, ...Read more at MovieRetriever.com »

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Gloria Stuart, 1910 - 2010

29 September 2010 5:36 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Updated through 9/29.

"Gloria Stuart, a 1930s Hollywood leading lady who earned an Academy Award nomination for her first significant role in nearly 60 years — as Old Rose, the centenarian survivor of the Titanic in James Cameron's 1997 Oscar-winning film — has died. She was 100." Dennis McLellan in the Los Angeles Times: "As a glamorous blond actress under contract to Universal Studios and 20th Century Fox in the 1930s, Stuart appeared opposite Claude Rains in James Whale's The Invisible Man and with Warner Baxter in John Ford's The Prisoner of Shark Island.... She also appeared with Eddie Cantor in Roman Scandals, with Dick Powell in Busby Berkeley's Gold Diggers of 1935 and with James Cagney in Here Comes the Navy.... After making 42 feature films between 1932 and 1939, Stuart's latest studio contract, with 20th Century Fox, was not renewed. She appeared in only four films in the 1940s and retired from the »

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Gloria Stuart obituary

28 September 2010 11:20 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Hollywood 30s ingenue whose return to acting gained her an Oscar nomination for Titanic

When Gloria Stuart, who has died aged 100, was nominated for the best supporting actress Oscar for her spirited performance in James Cameron's Titanic (1997), there were few filmgoers who remembered her earlier acting career in the 1930s. Stuart played the 101-year-old Rose (portrayed in the rest of the film by Kate Winslet), who recalls the time when she was 17 onboard the doomed liner. ("I can still smell the fresh paint," she says.)

Sixty-five years earlier, Stuart stood out as a blonde ingenue in James Whale's comedy-thriller The Old Dark House (1932), in which she wore a tight evening gown and was chased by Boris Karloff as a sinister butler. Stuart recalled how Whale told her: "When Karloff chases you through the halls, I want you to be like a flame or a dancer." She was both. »

- Ronald Bergan

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Gloria Stuart Rip

27 September 2010 9:00 PM, PDT | EmpireOnline | See recent EmpireOnline news »

Gloria Stuart, who is probably best known – at least by our generation – as the older Rose in Titanic, has died at the grand old age of 100.While James Cameron’s boat-buster gave her a healthy recognition bump among younger audiences, she launched her career back in the 1930s, after acting in college at Uc Berkeley and performing in small productions. Universal saw her potential and signed her to a contract, where she made movies with the likes of James Whale and Shirley Temple, before moving on to work for 20th Century Fox. After her time on the screen, she returned to the stage, before giving up acting in her mid ‘40s to pursue painting.The 1970s saw her drawn back into the world of acting, with TV movies and a role in 1982’s Peter O’Toole film My Favourite Year. She admitted to fostering a big crush on the actor. »

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