IMDb > Gus Van Sant > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 22 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Kristen Stewart may head an interesting cast to tell the Jt LeRoy story... but which one?

2 hours ago | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

One of the films from this year's Sundance Film Festival that I'm still chewing on is Author: The Jt LeRoy Story. The documentary by Jeff Feuerzeig is well-made and obviously was produced with an enormous amount of access to Laura Albert, the writer at the heart of the very, very strange saga. That's part of the problem, though. I'm not sure why anyone would ever trust a single word out of Albert's mouth, especially not on the subject of Jt LeRoy, and in the end, her involvement makes me believe the movie less, not more. For those unfamiliar with the story, Jt LeRoy was a literary phenomenon in the late '90s, a young author who became a celebrity as much for his backstory as for his prose. People like Bono and Courtney Love and Gus Van Sant and Billy Corgan all believed fervently in LeRoy, and while secrecy was »

- Drew McWeeny

Permalink | Report a problem


David Bowie’s Longtime Hairstylist Who Introduced Him to Iman Has Died: Reports

13 hours ago | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Teddy Antolin, David Bowie's longtime hairstylist, has died just under a month after the iconic rock star succumbed to a battle with cancer, according to reports. "It is with sadness that we report the news that Teddy Antolin has passed away," Bowie's official Facebook Page announced on Tuesday. "Teddy was a former hairdresser for David on several tours, video shoots and photo sessions. He will be missed." Antolin's cause of death has yet to be revealed. His age was not immediately known. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s); if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d. »

- Lindsay Kimble, @lekimble

Permalink | Report a problem


David Bowie’s Longtime Hairstylist Who Introduced Him to Iman Has Died: Reports

13 hours ago | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Teddy Antolin, David Bowie's longtime hairstylist, has died just under a month after the iconic rock star succumbed to a battle with cancer, according to reports. "It is with sadness that we report the news that Teddy Antolin has passed away," Bowie's official Facebook Page announced on Tuesday. "Teddy was a former hairdresser for David on several tours, video shoots and photo sessions. He will be missed." Antolin's cause of death has yet to be revealed. His age was not immediately known. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s); if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d. »

- Lindsay Kimble, @lekimble

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: Josh Brolin on His 'Christ-Like' Character in the Coen Brothers' 'Hail, Caesar!' (Exclusive)

1 February 2016 12:32 PM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Josh Brolin, like his "Hail, Caesar!" co-star George Clooney, came into his own as a movie star after years of trudging through less than fab B fare. Brolin credits his mid-career turnaround to Robert Rodriguez on "Grindhouse" which led to the Coen brothers and Oscar-winner "No Country for Old Men" and "True Grit." Brolin has been on a roll (with the occasional "Jonah Hex") ever since, shooting Gus Van Sant's "Milk" (landing a supporting actor nom), Oliver Stone's "W" and "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps,"  and Woody Allen's "You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger." Brolin is a chiseled American actor who boasts that rare combination: dangerous masculinity and sexy vulnerability. He plays both villains and lovers—see Jason Reitman's sexy "Labor Day." He played a cop with a flat top in Paul Thomas Anderson's "Inherent Vice," and 2015 brought strong turns »

- Anne Thompson

Permalink | Report a problem


How I Shot That: Dp Eric Edwards Explains Why The Right Tools Are More Important Than Ever

28 January 2016 6:58 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: The 2016 Indiewire Sundance Bible: All the Reviews, Interviews and News Posted During The Festival It's been twenty-five years since Eric Edwards worked with Gus Van Sant in shooting the seminal "My Own Private Idaho," having already worked in the industry for a decade. Since that time, he's been the cinematographer for projects across multiple media, including narrative features, documentaries and music videos. Now, he's lent his expertise to "The Hollars," the latest directorial effort from actor John Krasinski. The film, which follows Krasinski as a man returning to visit his ailing mother (Margo Martindale), premiered this past weekend at Sundance. Edwards sat down with us to discuss the practical and psychological motivations behind the artistic and technical choices that went into making "The Hollars." What camera and lens did you use? We used the Alexa. The Xt with the 4:3 sensor. We shot with the Hawk anamorphic lenses and they were. »

- Steve Greene

Permalink | Report a problem


Scott Reviews Kenneth Lonergan’s Manchester by the Sea [Sundance 2016]

27 January 2016 1:17 PM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

A note for readers – although I will attempt not to reveal crucial plot details that don’t fall under the general umbrella of the film’s premise (and which will certainly be incorporated into future trailers and the like), everyone has their own definitions of these things, so consider this fair warning.

All three of Kenneth Lonergan’s films deal with how people cope after tragedies. In You Can Count on Me, it was the past – two siblings who lost their parents in a car accident at a young age develop different ways of surviving that. In Margaret, the present; a teenager witnesses a horrific bus accident that leaves a woman dead in her arms. Manchester by the Sea folds a tragedy of the past into one of the present.

Lee Chandler (Casey Affleck) is a handyman for a block of Boston apartments.. He’s stuck in mundanity – shoveling snow, »

- Scott Nye

Permalink | Report a problem


Sundance Film Review: ‘As You Are’

26 January 2016 11:34 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A promising and impressively self-assured debut for 23-year-old filmmaker Miles Joris-Peyrafitte, “As You Are” is crafted with the confidence and skill of a veteran, but also the youthful eye of someone not far removed from his protagonists. His sensitively wrought teen-angst drama has a timeless quality that makes its early-’90s setting feel simultaneously specific and universal. Far from an easy sell commercially, the pic deserves careful handling by a specialty distrib capable of connecting with younger auds bound to see themselves reflected in the characters.

While Hollywood happily caters to teens in order to cash in at the box office, members of that age group are rarely depicted on screen with the sort of dignity and respect Joris-Peyrafitte and his co-writer Madison Harrison afford them here. Focused on the friendship between two high-school boys and the female classmate who both unites and divides them, the well-observed drama is somewhat »

- Geoff Berkshire

Permalink | Report a problem


Sundance Review: 'Dark Night' is a Gorgeous Look at an American Tragedy

24 January 2016 9:30 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: The 2016 Indiewire Sundance Bible: All the Reviews, Interviews and News Posted During The Festival Often in his "Dark Night," filmmaker Tim Sutton develops terrifying suspense around nothing happening. Loosely based on the 2012 shooting in Aurora, Colorado during a multiplex screening of "The Dark Knight," Sutton's elegantly designed drama contains a fascinating, enigmatic agenda. In its opening moments, Maica Armata's mournful score plays out as we watch a traumatized face lit up by the red-blue glow of a nearby police car. Mirroring the media image of tragedy divorced from the lives affected by it, the ensuing movie fills in those details. Over the last several years, Sutton has joined the ranks of a new American minimalism. While his aesthetic immediately calls to mind Gus Van Sant, Sutton's documentary-like technique of casting amateur performers in atmospheric conditions echoes a similar approach by Matthew Porterfield; both filmmakers are »

- Eric Kohn

Permalink | Report a problem


Sundance Film Review: ‘Author: The Jt Leroy Story’

24 January 2016 6:27 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

After refusing to cooperate with Marjorie Sturm on the latter’s fascinating “The Cult of Jt Leroy” last year, Laura Albert gets a podium for airing her side — and nobody else’s — in Jeff Feurzeig’s “Author: The Jt Leroy Story.” For many, however, the result may feel less an exoneration than a case of “Give ’em enough rope … ” The woman who wrote acclaimed books while posing as HIV-positive ex-prostitute transgender male Leroy does not buy as much retrospective sympathy as she seeks in painting herself as victim to various circumstances beyond her control, ignoring or evading the many ways in which the saga played out as a calculated, opportunistic con. This slickly crafted first-person recap of “Jt’s” starry rise and fall may well travel farther than its predecessor; Amazon picked up U.S. rights (its very first documentary acquisition) at Sundance. But it’s ultimately the less interesting film of the two, »

- Dennis Harvey

Permalink | Report a problem


‘The Dark Knight Rises’ Shooting Inspires Gritty Sundance Movie

24 January 2016 1:16 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Batman makes an eerie appearance in “Dark Night,” a new drama that is premiering at the Sundance Film Festival on Sunday night. The film was inspired by the 2012 Aurora, Colo., shooting that left 12 people dead at a midnight showing of “The Dark Knight Rises,” and it follows a deranged, lonely man on the day he decides to carry out a similar attack on his local movie theater. In one scene, the gunman looks into the mirror, trying on different costumes, before he pulls on a Batman mask.

“I don’t think this is an obscure movie,” says the film’s director and writer Tim Sutton. “This is a layered movie. The Batman mask is a way to say we all know what this film is about and to stare it in the face.”

Dark Night” was made in 16 days in Sarasota, Fla., using a cast of mostly non-professional actors. Although »

- Ramin Setoodeh

Permalink | Report a problem


[Sundance Review] The Free World

23 January 2016 5:25 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

The greatest southern gothic tales feature richly detailed atmosphere dripping with a strong sense of location. Night of the Hunter and other classics certainly fit the category, and the fairly recent Sundance drama Ain’t Them Bodies Saints was a fine example, featuring characters that, whether in a doomed romance or not, feel destined for one another. On paper, The Free World seemingly has all the necessary ingredients, yet the drama stumbles out of the gate with cliche after cliche, even when it tries to change things up with a sharp dramatic turn.

Beginning as a study of rehabilitation, Mo (Boyd Holbrook) recently got out of a prison stint in which he became defined as the toughest inmate, earning the nickname “Cyclops.” Working at an animal shelter under the tutelage of Linda (Octavia Spencer), he cleans cages and shows a tender care for the battered animals brought in. One day, »

- Jordan Raup

Permalink | Report a problem


Sundance Review: 'The Free World' Starring Boyd Holbrook, Elisabeth Moss & Octavia Spencer

22 January 2016 11:14 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Actor and writer Jason Lew, the screenwriter behind Gus Van Sant's "Restless," makes his feature directorial debut with “The Free World,” a sometimes-curious picture that takes on a big story with an intimate execution. “Curious” only because “The Free World” ends up in a place vastly different from where it starts, genre-hopping and taking unexpected turns. At times it feels as though the story might exceed the scope of the film, but it manages to stretch to contain it, and pushes the boundaries of what a “Sundance film” might be.  The film opens with a look inside the very small world of Mo (Boyd Holbrook). He’s a recently released felon working in an animal shelter for Linda (Octavia Spencer), who seems to have knowledge of “the inside” as well. He has a sparse life, an apartment with no furniture and no car. As we come to find out through snippets of conversation, »

- Katie Walsh

Permalink | Report a problem


Sundance Film Review: ‘The Free World’

22 January 2016 10:40 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Remember when Boyd Holbrook was just a scrawny young thing? Born and raised in Kentucky, he did some modeling, took acting classes and sent a screenplay off to Gus Van Sant, who gave him a minor role in “Milk,” launching an acting career that’s bound to lead him, sooner or later, to play a blockbuster comic-book character. In the meantime, Holbrook is proving what a capable performer he can be, turning up in indies such as “The Free World,” where it’s hard to believe the tortured soul with the prison-scarred brow, “Deadwood” goatee and haunted eyes was ever a child. Which is the effect writer-director Jason Lew (who wrote Van Sant’s “Restless”) intends with this well-meaning, well-acted but otherwise clumsily executed parable about second chances, whose damaged-goods pairing of Holbrook and Elisabeth Moss ensures at least a small release.

Having packed on considerable heft since last we »

- Peter Debruge

Permalink | Report a problem


Our 25 Most-Anticipated Films of Sundance Film Festival 2016

18 January 2016 5:33 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Comprising a considerable amount of our top 50 films of last year, Sundance Film Festival has proven to yield the first genuine look at what the year in cinema will bring. Now in its 38th iteration, we’ll be heading back to Park City this week, but before we do, it’s time to highlight the films we’re most looking forward to, including documentaries and narrative features from all around the world.

While much of the joy found in the festival comes from surprises throughout the event, below one will find our 25 most-anticipated titles off the bat, which doesn’t include some of the ones we’ve already seen and admired, notably Cemetery of Splendour, The Lobster and Rams. Check out everything below and for updates straight from the festival, make sure to follow us on Twitter (@TheFilmStage, @jpraup, @djmecca and @DanSchindel), and stay tuned to all of our coverage here. »

- Jordan Raup

Permalink | Report a problem


Vince Vaughn's Term Life Dropped Its First Image And There's Something We Really Need to Discuss

15 January 2016 12:52 PM, PST | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

Although primarily known for his comedic roles over the last two decades, Vince Vaughn has experienced a long career that has spanned numerous genres. He has done comedy, action, and even horror . but the less we say about Gus Van Sant.s Psycho the better. Despite having such a diverse resume, he has never really been known to change his appearance too much for a movie . until now. The first images from his new film, Term Life, have just been made available to us, and there.s something we really need to sit down and discuss. Check out the poster below.   As you can see, the poster features Vaughn, accompanied by co-star Hailee Steinfeld, brandishing a gun against a dreary, neo-noir urban landscape. It.s a fairly standard movie poster in general, but we all need to pay special attention to Vince Vaughn.s friggin hairdo. Unlike his usual short, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Examining Hollywood Remakes: Psycho

10 January 2016 10:41 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

It’s time to tackle another theatrical remake of a classic film. This week, Cinelinx looks at the 1998 revamp of Psycho; One of the most pointless and disappointing remakes of a great film ever attempted.

The original Psycho (1960) was the masterpiece of Alfred Hitchcock, one of the greatest film directors of all time. No one in the history of the industry could build suspense better than Hitchcock. The list of classic films he directed goes on and on, but Psycho is considered his ultimate achievement. The film not only foreshadowed and inspired the Slasher genre, it also gave us one of the most famous maniacs ever depicted in film—Norman Bates, owner of the Bates Motel—as well as the most famous and iconic murder scene ever filmed. The shower scene murder in this film has achieved a legendary status. Even Stephen King has praised the famed scene, saying, “No »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

Permalink | Report a problem


[Review] The Forest

8 January 2016 1:45 PM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Coming after Gus Van Sant’s critically torpedoed Sea of Trees, The Forest is the second recent movie to be set in Aokigahara, the mythic forest located at the base of Mt. Fuji, which has come to be known as the Suicide Forest. It’s a natural monument of cultural and historical significance in Japan’s history, and now, its own repeating ghost story as individuals return there with the express purpose to end their life.

That’s the thematic undercurrent for Jason Zada’s The Forest, a movie that attempts to capitalize on Aokigahara for a story of shared horror, but mostly just settles on a disposable ninety minutes of monster closets and diminishing sanity. As the story begins, Sara (Natalie Dormer) abruptly wakes up, feeling a mysterious disturbance with her twin sister despite being thousands of miles away. She impulsively hops on a flight to her sister’s last known location, »

- Michael Snydel

Permalink | Report a problem


New The Forest Movie Received Mostly Bad Reviews From Major Critics

8 January 2016 12:20 PM, PST | OnTheFlix | See recent OnTheFlix news »

Focus Features dropped their new horror/thriller movie, "The Forest," into theaters today, January 8th, 2016, and all the major, top movie critics have revealed their opinions, and unfortunately for the movie, they weren't all too pleased, giving it an over 35 score out of a possible 100 across 12 reviews at the Metacritic.com site. The film features : Eoin Macken, Natalie Dormer, Osamu Tanpopo and Stephanie Vogt. We've added comments from a few of the critics,below. Bill Zwecker from the Chicago Sun-Times, gave it an an average 75 score, stating: "With a nice, unexpected twist at the end, The Forest delivers as a healthy dose of psychological cinematic terror and an impressive first feature directing effort." Justin Chang over at Variety, gave it a 50 grade. He stated: "First-time director Jason Zada does generate an intermittently spooky sense of mystery that not even the muddled scripting can fully demolish." Neil Genzlinger from The New York Times, »

- Megan

Permalink | Report a problem


The Forest | Review

8 January 2016 10:10 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

For the Trees: Zada’s Moody Locale Squandered by Feeble Narrative

We’ve come to expect studios to unbosom their less desirable horror trinkets during the dawning of every new year, and the annual tradition is alive and well with the equivocally titled The Forest from first time director Jason Zada. On a positive note, it’s a return to more traditional formatting, a move away from the found footage items we usually find released in this quarter (The Devil Inside; Devil’s Due), and it’s also not a remake or a dubious sequel (The Last Exorcism Part II). But Zada’s film is the second English language film revealed over the past year to waste its singularly spooky locale, Japan’s Aokigahara Forest at the base of Mt. Fuji (the first being Gus Van Sant’s Cannes blooper, Sea of Trees, which may explain this horror film’s »

- Nicholas Bell

Permalink | Report a problem


The Forest review – copse chiller set in Japan loses its path

8 January 2016 2:00 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Japan’s Aokigahara forest is a notorious suicide spot – and it’s also proving fatal for film-makers, as this incoherent and meretricious horror movie proves

American movies don’t know what to do with Japanese culture. They aren’t world war two baddies anymore and the fear of their determined economy “coming to buy us up” has dissipated. The Forest, a trashy horror picture from first-time feature director Jason Zada and screenwriters Nick Antosca, Sarah Cornwell and Ben Ketai, plays to an audience that probably hasn’t done too much thinking about Japan lately. They eat weird food (it’s still moving!), all the girls wear the same school uniform and everyone believes in ghosts. What powers those ghosts have or how they can harm you is all rather vague, but you best believe it involves being real quiet, then charging at the camera when you least expect it, emitting a high-decibel shriek. »

- Jordan Hoffman

Permalink | Report a problem


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 22 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners