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1-20 of 40 items from 2010   « Prev | Next »


Poirot star David Suchet made a Cbe in New Year honours list

31 December 2010 2:57 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Stars from middle England's TV favourites TV's Little Dorrit, Rag Trade and Last of the Summer Wine among those awarded

The brief cast of actors named in today's New Year honours list reads like a triumph for middle England and its favourite long-running television shows, from Poirot star David Suchet to Last of the Summer Wine's Bert Kwouk.

Suchet, who has starred in 65 episodes of Agatha Christie's Poirot on ITV since 1989, was made a Cbe for services to drama, as was fellow actor Sheila Hancock, the former Rag Trade star and widow of actor John Thaw who has reinvented herself in recent years as a best-selling author, musical star and judge on Andrew Lloyd Webber's BBC1 talent show, Over the Rainbow.

Harriet Walter, the star of stage and screen including BBC1's Little Dorrit and a stint in ITV1's Law and Order: UK, was made a »

- John Plunkett

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From Pulp to Prokofiev: Jarvis Cocker narrates Peter and the Wolf

29 December 2010 4:01 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Pulp singer delights his young audience at Royal Festival Hall with his narration of the Russian composer's children's story

Being asked to narrate Peter and the Wolf is like being cast as Lear: the ultimate sign you have pricked a certain layer of the nation's consciousness. David Bowie has done it. So has Peter Ustinov. Ditto Patrick Stewart, Ben Kingsley and David Attenborough. It was only a matter of time, then, before Jarvis Cocker was given the honour.

Like those that have gone before him, the Pulp singer is the owner of a voice you'd recognise underwater, a deep and warm tenor with vowels as flat as his native Sheffield is hilly.

"Hello everyone. I'm Jarvis," he said with a salute, as he strode on to the stage at London's Royal Festival Hall. The introduction was not superfluous. While Cocker will be remembered by anyone over 30 after his bottom sabotaged »

- Helen Pidd

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Why we don’t have our own cinema

23 December 2010 9:42 AM, PST | Pure Movies | See recent Pure Movies news »

Let’s go back to when Britain had its own cinema and see who some of our homegrown stars were then. If we dissolve back to 1960, we find a plethora of movie stars - enough to guarantee full houses in all the West End, and regional theatres, in the country. Here are just some of them: Margaret Rutherford, Joyce Grenfell, John Mills, Leslie Phillips, Joan Sims, Virginia McKenna, Denholm Elliott, Fenella Fielding, Alec Guinness, Leo McKern, Diana Dors, Terry Thomas, Richard Burton, Dirk Bogarde, Peter Sellers, Laurence Olivier, Joan Greenwood, Hermione Baddeley, Moira Lister, Oliver Reed, Dennis Price, Michael Hordern, Robert Shaw, Michael Redgrave, Robert Morley, Laurence Harvey, Paul Scofield, Richard Harris, Tom Courtenay, Leslie-Anne Down, George Formby, Peter Ustinov, Peter Finch, Harry Andrews, Maxine Audley, Nigel Stock, Eric Porter, Noel Coward, Dinsdale Landen, Bernard Cribbins, Patrick Wymark, Shirley-Anne Field, and Moira Redmond… »

- Jonathan Gems

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Top 10 movies starring toys that come alive

25 November 2010 8:46 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

As Toy Story 3 arrives on DVD and Blu-ray, we look at other films in which toys walk and talk under their own power, and they've been doing it for quite a while too!

The Toy Story triumvirate will reign supreme among stories of toys coming to life and it's hard to imagine any single film or series that uses the premise of living playthings ever besting the perfect trio of movies.

But having given the hat trick fair praise, the toys in Andy's room weren't the first to walk and talk under their own control, and other stories feature toys springing to life when their owners aren't around or by the power of dreams and wishes, the magic of midnight or, in one case, the might of military grade munitions chips.

So, if you still have room for more childhood toy fantasies and adventures beyond Woody, Buzz and their crew, »

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Toys that come alive in films

25 November 2010 8:46 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

As Toy Story 3 arrives on DVD and Blu-ray, we look at other films in which toys walk and talk under their own power, and they've been doing it for quite a while too!

The Toy Story triumvirate will reign supreme among stories of toys coming to life and it's hard to imagine any single film or series that uses the premise of living playthings ever besting the perfect trio of movies.

But having given the hat trick fair praise, the toys in Andy's room weren't the first to walk and talk under their own control, and other stories feature toys springing to life when their owners aren't around or by the power of dreams and wishes, the magic of midnight or, in one case, the might of military grade munitions chips.

So, if you still have room for more childhood toy fantasies and adventures beyond Woody, Buzz and their crew, »

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Shakespeare and his greatest heroes and villains reimagined in new comic

22 November 2010 11:43 AM, PST | The Geek Files | See recent The Geek Files news »

Long-time friends and collaborators Conor McCreery and Anthony Del Col have taken Shakespeare's greatest characters and tossed them into a literary food processor.

The result is a comic book thriller called Kill Shakespeare, a 12-part series that combines classic literature and pop culture.

The first six issues have now been collected into a trade paperback called A Sea of Troubles, published this month by Idw. A teaser trailer for the project is included below.

"We know there'll be some controversy, 'How dare we bring Shakespeare to comic books,'" says Del Col. "We think it's a great way to spark interest in the greatest writer of all time, from young people and beyond."

In the story, Hamlet (the hero), banished from his home country for the murder of Polonius, is attacked by pirates at sea. He survives and awakens in the castle of Richard III (the villain) who sends him »

- David Bentley

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Simon MacCorkindale obituary

17 October 2010 10:26 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Suave actor known for his roles in Falcon Crest, Casualty and the recent stage version of The Sound of Music

In common with his contemporaries Jeremy Irons, Michael York and Hugh Grant, the actor Simon MacCorkindale, who has died of cancer aged 58, on screen projected the very English persona of an ex-public schoolboy. But unlike them, MacCorkindale never made it big in films. Nevertheless, his "posh" accent, his suave demeanour and patrician good looks made him a natural for roles in television soap operas, from the opulent mansions of Falcon Crest (1984-1986), to the hospital corridors of Casualty (2002-2008). In the latter, he played the autocratic clinical consultant Harry Harper, who ran Holby City hospital's emergency department. A doctor of the old school, he sweeps through the wards, advising, cajoling, admonishing and seducing colleagues and patients alike.

In 2007, having already been diagnosed with bowel cancer, MacCorkindale learned that it had »

- Ronald Bergan

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Tony Curtis: a life in clips

1 October 2010 2:12 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Tony Curtis, whose career spans 60 years in Hollywood, has died aged 85. We look back over his career in clips

He was young, he was pretty and he came fired by ambition. As a contracted Hollywood actor, the youthful Tony Curtis found himself shoehorned into all manner of substandard (and at times wildly inappropriate) studio outings. In The Black Shield of Falworth (1954) he plays a hardy swashbuckler in the time of Henry IV. "Yonder stands the castle of my faddah," he is reputed to say at one stage. Except that he never actually did. The line was actually concocted by critics to poke fun at the actor's broad Bronx accent.

Few films better captured the corrupt underside of 1950s Manhattan than The Sweet Smell of Success (1957), with its swooping jazz soundtrack, smoke-filled saloon bars and poisonous inhabitants. Curtis rustled up a tour-de-force as Sidney Falco, the smooth-cheeked press agent who schemes, »

- Xan Brooks

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Tony Curtis: a life in clips

1 October 2010 2:12 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Tony Curtis, whose career spans 60 years in Hollywood, has died aged 85. We look back over his career in clips

He was young, he was pretty and he came fired by ambition. As a contracted Hollywood actor, the youthful Tony Curtis found himself shoehorned into all manner of substandard (and at times wildly inappropriate) studio outings. In The Black Shield of Falworth (1954) he plays a hardy swashbuckler in the time of Henry IV. "Yonder stands the castle of my faddah," he is reputed to say at one stage. Except that he never actually did. The line was actually concocted by critics to poke fun at the actor's broad Bronx accent.

Few films better captured the corrupt underside of 1950s Manhattan than The Sweet Smell of Success (1957), with its swooping jazz soundtrack, smoke-filled saloon bars and poisonous inhabitants. Curtis rustled up a tour-de-force as Sidney Falco, the smooth-cheeked press agent who schemes, »

- Xan Brooks

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Graham Greene, Arthur Ransome and Somerset Maugham all spied for Britain, admits MI6

21 September 2010 9:26 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Secret Intelligence Service's first authorised history aims to debunk James Bond 'licence to kill' myth

The authors Graham Greene, Arthur Ransome, Somerset Maugham, Compton Mackenzie and Malcolm Muggeridge, and the philosopher Aj "Freddie" Ayer, all worked for MI6, Britain's Secret Intelligence Service admitted for the first time today . They are among the many exotic characters who agreed to spy for Britain, mainly during wartime, who appear in a the first authorised history of MI6. The book even reveals that the intelligence agency's deputy chief, Claude Dansey, was seduced by "Robbie" Ross, said to have been Oscar Wilde's first lover.

It describes the antics of Ecclesiastic, mistress of a German Abwehr military intelligence officer in Lisbon run by "Klop" Ustinov, Peter Ustinov's father. It also tells the story of how a Dutch MI6 agent, Peter Tazelaar, was put ashore on a beach near the casino at Schevening, The Hague, »

- Richard Norton-Taylor

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Longtime NBC newsman Edwin Newman dies

15 September 2010 7:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Edwin Newman, who served NBC News for 32 years and was one of the most respected journalists in broadcast news, has died, the network announced Wednesday. He was 91.

Newman died peacefully of pneumonia Aug. 13 in Oxford, England, his lawyer Rupert Mead told Reuters. His wife and daughter wanted to wait before announcing his death to come to terms with the loss, Mead said.

Newman was regarded as a master journalist -- a newsman, a commentator and an esteemed critic. He received the George Foster Peabody Award in 1966 for "wit and depth of understanding" for his radio news broadcasts.

Beginning in 1961 and until his retirement in 1984, Newman was an indefatigable force in network news. In addition to his commentary, he narrated numerous documentary specials for NBC -- at one point, he acknowledged that he had, perhaps, made more TV docs than anyone. He also moderated two presidential debates: Ford vs. Carter in 1976 and Reagan vs. »

- By Duane Byrge

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Clive Donner obituary

7 September 2010 11:19 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Director who captured swinging London's zeitgeist and remade classics for television

For a few years in the 1960s, Clive Donner, who has died aged 84 after suffering from Alzheimer's disease, was among the leading film directors of swinging London. Unfortunately, when London stopped swinging, so did Donner. The four films that made his name were a low-budget adaptation of Harold Pinter's play The Caretaker (1963); Nothing But the Best (1964), a wicked satire on the British class structure; the farcical What's New Pussycat? (1965); and the coming-of-age comedy Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush (1968).

Already in his 30s when he started directing, Donner gained a reputation for being tuned in to "youth". His debut movie, The Secret Place (1957), a heist drama shot on location in the East End, had David McCallum as a Brandoesque leather-jacketed "crazy mixed-up kid".

The Heart of a Child (1958) concerned a boy and his St Bernard dog, Rudi, »

- Ronald Bergan

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Robert Ryan on TCM: The Set-up, Crossfire, Billy Budd

12 August 2010 5:57 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Robert Ryan (left) in Robert Wise‘s The Set-Up Robert Ryan, one of the greatest Hollywood actors of the studio era — or any other era — will have his Turner Classic Movies Day on Friday, Aug. 13. Friday the Thirteenths don’t get any luckier. On Robert Ryan Day, TCM will present thirteen of the actor’s films as part of its "Summer Under the Stars" series. [Full Robert Ryan schedule.] Ryan can be seen at his best in three movies being shown on TCM: Edward Dmytryk‘s Crossfire (1947), Robert Wise‘s The Set-Up (1949), and Peter Ustinov‘s Billy Budd (1962). In Crossfire, Ryan plays a Us World War II veteran who has more in common with the Nazis than he (and others) would care to believe. (In the movie, his victim is a Jewish man; in future director Richard Brooks‘ novel, it was a gay man.) For his role as the psycho bigot, Ryan [...] »

- Andre Soares

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Alfred Molina interview: The Sorcerer's Apprentice, Boogie Nights, Prince Of Persia and more

8 August 2010 5:30 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

In the run-up to the release of The Sorcerer’s Apprentice, we met with actor Alfred Molina to discuss acting, Jerry Bruckheimer and Boogie Nights…

It's been a busy summer for Alfred Molina. After a scene-stealing comedic turn in Prince of Persia: The Sands Of Time, he's back on blockbuster duty opposite Nicolas Cage in The Sorcerer's Apprentice. Den Of Geek spent ten, stretched to a cheeky twelve, minutes in his company to talk playing bad, less is more, Boogie Nights, and Engelbert Humperdink.

This is your second Jerry Bruckheimer film in very quick succession ...

Yes, almost one after the other.

So, you filmed this straight after Prince Of Persia?

Almost. We were towards the end of Prince Of Persia and just moved from Morocco back to London to the sound stage at Pinewood. And Jerry and the Disney producers were already making plans for The Sorcerer's Apprentice and one of them said to me, »

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The film that changed my life: Alfred Molina

7 August 2010 4:02 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Spartacus by Stanley Kubrick, 1960

"Oh, that's what I want to do," I remember thinking when I watched Spartacus for the first time. I must have been about 11 or 12 at the time, so I suspect I didn't see it during its original 1960 run.

I went to the cinema with a group of friends –we may or may not have been taken by an adult, one of my parents. I can't recall now. All I can remember, and vividly, was my complete immersion in the Roman world.

Much to my parents' consternation, it was the first film to make me utter those fateful words: "I want to be an actor." They must have groaned, and thought: there's five bob wasted.

Later, when I got a bit older and was training and working as an actor, a lot of the early Robert De Niro films – Taxi Driver, Raging Bull – had a profound effect »

- Tom Lamont

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Tonight's TV highlights

30 July 2010 12:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Doctor Who | One Under | The Old Guys | The It Crowd | BBC Proms 2010 | Pet Shop Boys at Glastonbury

Doctor Who

7pm, BBC3

The notion of regeneration, while a brilliant way to keep Doctor Who fresh and introduce new blood, makes it tricky for any actor parachuted into the lead role. That's why they let Matt Smith film a few later episodes first, allowing him to find his voice, before recording The Eleventh Hour, the opening episode of this series. It's a fine story, one in keeping with the eccentric Britishness of the show, as it concerns both a global alien threat and a nice village green. Karen Gillan and show-runner Stephen Moffat appear in Doctor Who Confidential after. Po'n

One Under

7.30pm, Channel 4

The title of this First Cut documentary refers to a person under a train on London's underground. Lucy Bennett's film introduces us to Debbie, whose husband »

- Phelim O'Neill, Martin Skegg, Ali Catterall, Julia Raeside, John Robinson, Rebecca Nicholson

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Curb Your Enthusiasm Triumphs At Banff

14 June 2010 9:16 AM, PDT | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Larry David's hit comedy show Curb Your Enthusiasm was among the big winners at the Banff World Television Festival in Canada on Sunday.

The hit programme was named Best Comedy in the category honouring the best fiction shows from across the globe, while In Treatment scooped the Rockie Award for Best Continuing Series.

The festival, which runs in Alberta, Canada from 13 to 16 June, also saw prizes awarded to the BBC's Bill Bailey's Remarkable Guide to the Orchestra and Danish series The Yellow House, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

British funnyman Ricky Gervais will also be celebrated at the event - he will be honoured with the Sir Peter Ustinov comedy award during a ceremony on Tuesday night.

Meanwhile, William Shatner will be handed a lifetime achievement award and actor Eric McCormack will pick up the NBC Universal Canada award of distinction. »

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Alice through the projector lens

6 June 2010 5:03 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Mark charts the cinematic history of Lewis Carroll’s Alice, from the earliest days of the moving image to the present day…

With a new interpretation of the Lewis Carroll classic on DVD and Blu-ray, I thought it might be an interesting diversion to look at the history of Alice In Wonderland in cinema and TV. This is far from a definitive list of Alice-inspired productions, but here are some of those that fell down my rabbit hole...

Alice In Wonderland (1903)

The first film Alice, I think, it stood out if only for the impressively lavish costumes and sets which the director insisted remain faithful to the drawings of Sir John Tenniel, the original illustrator of Lewis Carroll‘s story. However, that blew all the budget, so the cast is mostly the crew, including 'Alice' Mabel Clark who was also the studio secretary. When this came out it was the »

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Blu-Ray Review: 50th Anniversary Edition of ‘Spartacus’

1 June 2010 12:04 PM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – I think nearly every film critic with an association card has bowed at the altar of Stanley Kubrick at least once in their life (if they don’t still do so). I can vividly remember first seeing “2001: A Space Odyssey,” “The Shining,” “A Clockwork Orange,” “Dr. Strangelove,” and “Full Metal Jacket,” all films I could watch any day of the week and never grow tired of them. Despite saying that, I was never a huge “Spartacus” fan, a film I admire more than love. The new Blu-ray release has not changed my mind.

Blu-Ray Rating: 4.0/5.0

The 50th Anniversary Edition of “Spartacus” has caused quite a bit of controversy in the days preceding and since its May 25th release. Robert Harris, the man credited with the film’s restoration on a shot by shot basis twenty years ago with the support of Kirk Douglas and Stanley Kubrick, absolutely hates this HD transfer, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Carlito’S Way and Spartacus 50th Anniversary Edition Blu-ray Reviews

28 May 2010 6:32 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Between Carlito’s Way and Spartacus on Blu-ray we see the greatness and weakness of Blu. When it comes to modern films – and with more films shot digitally – you don’t find a lot of recent films that look bad on the format. And even if a film is still shot on film (even 16mm, as with The Wrestler) the material is supervised by the makers, and the source material is going to be pristine. But when it comes to older films, the material can be lacking, and decisions can be made to smooth out or remove grain. With many of the creative team behind these films no longer with us, you could argue there’s no right answer, just preference. And then you have the case of The French Connection where the director changes the color palette on what appears to be his whim. No one’s going to »

- Andre Dellamorte

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1-20 of 40 items from 2010   « Prev | Next »


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