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1-20 of 24 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Exodus: Gods And Kings Review

12 December 2014 2:21 PM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

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Exodus: Gods And Kings Review 1 of 5

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The burden of history weighs heavily on Christian Bale’s Moses in Exodus: Gods and Kings. Its director, Ridley Scott, can no doubt sympathize. He’s adapting a story that’s literally scripture, but cinematic gospel is stacked against him as well. With DeMille having told what is, to many, the definitive Bible story in The Ten Commandments, and Scott himself having largely perfected the 21st century sword and sandal epic with Gladiator, what novelty can Gods and Kings really bring to the table? The answer is typically modern of Scott and other blockbuster filmmakers: more and more spectacle, less and less clarity of vision.

“Israelite means “one who fights with God,”” Moses is told early on by Ben Mendelsohn’s snivelling viceroy, the sort of character Peter Ustinov would have devoured back during a time when »

- Sam Woolf

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The 35 Greatest Murder Mystery Movies Ever Made

28 November 2014 7:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Murder mysteries are so commonplace on TV that each week offers seemingly dozens of them on police procedural series and detective shows. But in the movies, whodunits are surprisingly rare, and really good ones rarer still. There's really only a handful of movies that excel in offering the viewer the pleasure of solving the crime along with a charismatic sleuth, often with an all-star cast of suspects hamming it up as they try not to appear guilty.

One of the best was "Murder on the Orient Express," released 40 years ago this week, on November 24, 1974. Like many films adapted from Agatha Christie novels, this one featured an eccentric but meticulous investigator (in this case, Albert Finney as Belgian epicure Hercule Poirot), a glamorous and claustrophobic setting (here, the famous luxury train from Istanbul to Paris), and a tricky murder plot with an outrageous solution. The film won an Oscar for passenger »

- Gary Susman

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Loco to open with Lost In Karastan

20 November 2014 4:26 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

London Comedy Film Festival to open with a satirical comedy starring Matthew Macfadyen.

Loco, the London Comedy Film Festival, will open Jan 22 with Ben HopkinsLost In Karastan (fka Epic), a satirical comedy starring Matthew Macfadyen as Emil Forester, a down-at-heel British director who is flattered when the president of Karastan invites him to film their national epic.

The festival presents Discovery Awards for shorts and features. The feature nominees are SuperBob by Jon Drever, Mle by Sarah Warren and The Fitzroy by Andrew Harmer. These films will be showcased on Curzon Home Cinema.

Other film selections include The Bubonic Play (world premiere); Dutch dark comedy Farewell To The Moon; Czech selection Totally Talking; and Onur Tukel’s vampire comedy Summer of Blood.

The classic films showing include Kind Hearts and Coronets, The Fisher King, Who Framed Roger Rabbit?, and Abigail’s Party, paired with a 1970s-themed drinks party. Kids’ screenings include Aladdin at the BFI IMAX »

- wendy.mitchell@screendaily.com (Wendy Mitchell)

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London Stage Star and Olivier Henry V Leading Lady Asherson Dead at Age 99

4 November 2014 4:56 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Henry V' Movie Actress Renée Asherson dead at 99: Laurence Olivier leading lady in acclaimed 1944 film (image: Renée Asherson and Laurence Olivier in 'Henry V') Renée Asherson, a British stage actress featured in London productions of A Streetcar Named Desire and Three Sisters, but best known internationally as Laurence Olivier's leading lady in the 1944 film version of Henry V, died on October 30, 2014. Asherson was 99 years old. The exact cause of death hasn't been specified. She was born Dorothy Renée Ascherson (she would drop the "c" some time after becoming an actress) on May 19, 1915, in Kensington, London, to Jewish parents: businessman Charles Ascherson and his second wife, Dorothy Wiseman -- both of whom narrowly escaped spending their honeymoon aboard the Titanic. (Ascherson cancelled the voyage after suffering an attack of appendicitis.) According to Michael Coveney's The Guardian obit for the actress, Renée Asherson was "scantly »

- Andre Soares

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Kubrick's 'Spartacus' Among Four New Restorations Headed for TCM Fest

3 November 2014 12:09 PM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Audiences need a good reason to go to a movie theater these days, and a digital restoration of a great film classic is one of them. The 2015 TCM Classic Film Festival has landed four world premiere restorations set to play the fest from March 26-29, 2015 at Hollywood venues in Los Angeles. TCM will celebrate the film's 55th anniversary with a new print of Stanley Kubrick's glorious 1960 Roman epic "Spartacus," starring Kirk Douglas as the title rebel warrior, with Tony Curtis, Jean Simmons, Laurence Olivier, Charles Laughton, John Gavin and Peter Ustinov, who won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar in 1961. A restoration of Ron Howard's beloved 1995 space odyssey "Apollo 13," turning 20 next year, will also be playing the festival. Both are presented in collaboration with Universal Home Entertainment. TCM and Warner Bros. Classics will unveil a new print of William Dieterle's majestic 1939 Rko Production of Victor Hugo's "The Hunchback of Notre. »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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Four World Premiere Restorations At 2015 TCM Film Festival Include Ron Howard’s Apollo 13 & Stanley Kubrick’s Spartacus

3 November 2014 11:54 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) has landed four film restorations set to make their world premieres during the 2015 TCM Classic Film Festival, taking place March 26-29, 2015, in Hollywood. The movies, each from a different era in cinema history, including Ron Howard’s Apollo 13 (1995), Stanley Kubrick’s Spartacus (1960), William Dieterle’s The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939) and Charles Reisner and Buster Keaton’s Steamboat Bill Jr. (1928). The Keaton comedy will be accompanied by legendary silent film composer Carl Davis conducting the world premiere performance of his new score for the film.

Earlier this month, TCM announced that the theme for the 2015 TCM Classic Film Festival will be History According to Hollywood:

The Old West. Medieval England. Ancient Rome. Hollywood has found endless inspiration in re-creating historical moments and bringing to life the heroes and villains of the past, creating a form of time travel for audiences through the ages and around the world. »

- Melissa Thompson

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Re-Viewed: Logan's Run changed sci-fi blockbusters forever

19 October 2014 1:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Teen-focused sci-fi dystopias are all the rage at the moment, between this month's The Maze Runner, Divergent, The Host, and of course the mighty Hunger Games. But none of them can hold a candle to Michael Anderson's classic Logan's Run, which was made the year before Star Wars came along and changed sci-fi blockbusters forever.

Based on the cult novel by William F. Nolan and George Clayton Johnson, the film is set in 2274, with the remnants of humanity living in a computer-controlled, sealed, domed city after a non-specific apocalypse. 23rd century society is pretty much a utopia: citizens get to shop, take drugs and have sex as much as they like, with the central computers taking care of reproduction and, it's implied, child-rearing. There's just one catch: when you turn 30, you are deemed no longer useful to society and you have to either take your chances in a bizarre »

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Hollywood Classics To Distribute Films From Elliot Kastner Library

25 September 2014 3:18 PM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Mickey Rourke and Christopher Walken in "Homeboy".

Cinema Retro has received the following press release from Dillon Kastner, who represents the estate of his late father, producer Elliot Kastner:  

Hollywood Classics has signed a new distribution agreement with Dillon Kastner of Cinema Seven Productions to represent the Elliot Kastner library for all rights.

Titles in the library of the Hollywood producer include comedy musical A Chorus of Disapproval, starring Jeremy Irons and Anthony Hopkins, and Us sports drama Homeboy with Mickey Rourke and Christopher Walken.

John Ramchandani, MD of Hollywood Classics said: “I am delighted to work with Dillon Kastner on the wonderfully eclectic and adored selection of his father’s features.

“Throughout his extensive career Elliott worked with the highest calibre of world-renowned actors, screenwriters and directors including Peter Ustinov, Jeremy Irons, James Spader, Pierce Brosnan, Alan Ayckbourn and Donald Cammell.”

Dillon Kastner of Cinema Seven Productions Ltd said: »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Hollywood Classics signs Kastner library

23 September 2014 12:00 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Titles include A Chorus of Disapproval, Homeboy.

Hollywood Classics has signed a new distribution agreement with Dillon Kastner of Cinema Seven Productions to represent the Elliot Kastner library for all rights.

Titles in the library of the Hollywood producer include comedy musical A Chorus of Disapproval, starring Jeremy Irons and Anthony Hopkins, and Us sports drama Homeboy with Mickey Rourke and Christopher Walken.

John Ramchandani, MD of Hollywood Classics said: “I am delighted to work with Dillon Kastner on the wonderfully eclectic and adored selection of his father’s features.

“Throughout his extensive career Elliott worked with the highest calibre of world-renowned actors, screenwriters and directors including Peter Ustinov, Jeremy Irons, James Spader, Pierce Brosnan, Alan Ayckbourn and Donald Cammell.”

Dillon Kastner of Cinema Seven Productions Ltd said: ‘It is a pleasure to be working alongside the team at Hollywood Classics.

“My father had many ups and downs in his career, and independent »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Alan Landsburg, Prolific TV Producer, Dies at 81

18 August 2014 4:11 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Alan Landsburg, a TV producer with wide-ranging interests who produced a vast number of TV movies and documentaries, as well as the speculative series “In Search Of,” famously narrated by Leonard Nimoy, died Aug. 14 in Los Angeles. He was 81.

Landsburg was nominated for an Oscar for the 1971 feature documentary “Alaska Wilderness Lake,” which he produced. He was also nominated for five Emmys, winning for the fine, even now well-remembered 1970 telepic “A Storm in Summer,” starring Peter Ustinov, and nominated for beloved 1981 telepic “Bill,” starring Mickey Rooney, as well as for 1975’s “Fear on Trial,” 1978’s “Between the Wars” and 1983’s “Adam,” a telepic about the kidnapping of John Walsh’s son.

Landsburg produced reams of nature documentaries, including episodes of “The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau” and “National Geographic Specials”; the historical docu series “Men in Crisis”; a docu series with a more feature-like feel in “Time-Life Specials: The March »

- Carmel Dagan

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Nathan Lane Receives Peter Ustinov Comedy Award at Banff World Media Festival

30 May 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Nathan Lane never turns off his sense of humor, one of many reasons that he is this year’s recipient of the Peter Ustinov Comedy Award at the Banff World Media Festival. “I’m always thrilled when anyone wants to give me an award,” Lane says. “Although I somehow think there’s been a horrible mistake.”

Lane, who began his career as a stand-up comedian but has since worked in TV, film and theater, has a longstanding passion for life on the stage. Musicals and plays, such as “The Odd Couple,” have given the Tony Award winner an opportunity to play deeper, grittier characters as he has on CBS’ “The Good Wife.”

“It’s reminded people that I do more than comedy,” Lane says. “No one’s offering me anything of that kind of depth or complexity in film … which is certainly one of the reasons I love the theater so much. »

- Francesca Bacardi

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Scar, Gaston, Maleficent: Who is Disney's greatest ever villain?

29 May 2014 6:40 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

When you think of Disney films, you usually think of the amazing songs, lovable heroes and heartwarming romantic tales.

But no Disney classic would be complete without an incredible villain to scare the bejeezus out of your inner 5-year-old.

In tribute to the release of Disney's Maleficent, we've picked out our favourite Disney villains of all time.

Lotso from Toy Story 3 (Alex Fletcher, Deputy Editor)

He may have been pink and smelled like strawberries, but there was nothing even slightly cuddly about Lotso. The villains in the previous Toy Story movies were pretty nasty - Sid, Al McWhiggin, Stinky Pete - but Lotso wins the prize for being the most dastardly of the lot. And don't even get us started on his scary baby sidekick!

His worst crime? Even after he is saved by our gang of plastic heroes, who are willing to forget his Sunnyside misdemeanours, he still turns on them again. »

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Trailers from Hell Does 'The Pink Panther'

28 April 2014 8:14 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Today on Trailers from Hell, Dan Ireland takes on the first of the seven "Pink Panther" films, from 1964, starring Peter Sellers as Inspector Clouseau. A chameleon by nature, Peter Sellers had been turning in inspired comic performances since the early fifties - but it took the role of the habitually hapless Inspector Clouseau (originally intended for Peter Ustinov) in this first of seven "Pink Panther" comedies to catapult him to superstar status. Though director Blake Edwards' screenplay placed the bumbling detective at the center of a comic ensemble that included David Niven (who signed on expecting his role to be the lead), Capucine and Robert Wagner, Sellers would have free reign over the film's even funnier sequel, "A Shot in the Dark." Henry Mancini contributed the ultra-lounge score along with the  memorable theme song. A lamentable animated cartoon series helped kill off theatrical cartoons. »

- Trailers From Hell

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The Pink Panther

27 April 2014 10:00 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

A chameleon by nature, Peter Sellers had been turning in inspired comic performances since the early fifties – but it took the role of the habitually hapless Inspector Clouseau (originally intended for Peter Ustinov) in this first of seven The Pink Panther comedies to catapult him to superstar status. Though director Blake Edwards’ screenplay placed the bumbling detective at the center of a comic ensemble that included David Niven (who signed on expecting his role to be the lead), Capucine and Robert Wagner, Sellers would have free reign over the film’s even funnier sequel, A Shot in the Dark. Henry Mancini contributed the ultra-lounge score along with the  memorable theme song.  A lamentable animated cartoon series helped kill off theatrical cartoons.

The post The Pink Panther appeared first on Trailers From Hell.

»

- TFH Team

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Ranking the Films of Stanley Kubrick

22 April 2014 9:04 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

There are few auteurs as instantly recognizable and divisive as Stanley Kubrick, few filmmakers as idiosyncratic or groundbreaking. His work spans the entirety of life itself–sometimes in the same film–and has inspired almost as much derision as hosannas. There is no easy consensus on Kubrick’s films–though you may not be terribly surprised by our writers’ choice for his best, it’s hard to imagine that your ranking of his work will line up wholly with ours–nor on the messages imparted within. Is The Shining secretly about the moon landing? Is 2001? What is he really saying about violence in society in A Clockwork Orange? And so on. Closing out (some weeks late, granted) our monthly theme on his works, here is Sound on Sight’s ranking of the films of Stanley Kubrick. Enjoy. Share. Debate. We know you’ll want to debate.

1. 2001: A Space Odyssey »

- Josh Spiegel

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Lorenzo's Oil

10 April 2014 6:38 AM, PDT | Sky Movies | See recent Sky Movies news »

Nick Nolte and an Oscar-nominated Susan Sarandon play the couple fighting to save their young son from a rare, degenerative brain disease in this fact-based drama. Peter Ustinov is among the many doctors who say there's no cure for Lorenzo, but that doesn't stop his parents from trying to find one. After Mad Max and The Witches of Eastwick, director George Miller shows his versatility with a heartfelt but clear-eyed telling of an extraordinary true tale. »

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Robin Hood (1973)

8 April 2014 1:58 AM, PDT | Sky Movies | See recent Sky Movies news »

A match for any of Disney's more widely proclaimed animated adventures, this take on the legend sees vulpine hero Robin Hood out to outfox thumb-sucking tyrant Prince John (voiced by Peter Ustinov) while winning the heart of Maid Marian and, naturally, ensuring the poor don't go away empty handed. With Phil Harris (The Jungle Book's Baloo) as Little John, musician Roger Miller providing narration as cockerel-cool minstrel Allan-a-Dale, and perennial British cad Terry-Thomas perfectly casssst as Prince John's hench-snake Sir Hiss, there's more colour to the denizens of this Sherwood Forest than mere Lincoln green. »

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37 Days; Line of Duty; Mind the Gap: London vs the Rest – review

8 March 2014 4:08 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

BBC2's first world war drama 37 Days was a march over very familiar territory. Spoiler alert: negotiations didn't work

37 Days (BBC2) | iPlayer

Line of Duty (BBC2) | iPlayer

Mind the Gap: London vs the Rest (BBC2) | iPlayer

As Russia's forces gathered on its western border last week, we were reminded once again that history repeats itself. First as tragedy, then as a three-part BBC series.

The particular section of history dramatised in 37 Days has been repeating itself of late like a pub bore on a baked bean diet. We may have our educational lacunae in this country, but surely most viewers could now gain an Oxford history first on the causes of the first world war.

Written by Mark Hayhurst, who scripted 2011's The Man Who Crossed Hitler, 37 Days covered the period between the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand on 28 June 1914 and Britain's declaration of war against Germany on 4 August. »

- Andrew Anthony

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Nymphomaniac (Volumes 1 and 2) – review

21 February 2014 3:02 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

An appealing odd-couple relationship is at the heart of this heartfelt study of sex addiction with few of the director's usual provocations

To recap: Lars von Trier makes an explicit film called Nymphomaniac; he orchestrates some traditional tongue-in-cheek Trier publicity about "hardcore" and "softcore" versions; he even induces excitable critics in Denmark and elsewhere to pull a gallery of orgasm faces in homage to the naughty poster campaign – like a Victorian medical textbook about congenital idiocy. Yet his new film is his most inoffensive, which is to say its offensiveness is deliberate; it's the first Von Trier film that is not a tiresome practical joke on the audience. It is about the most tender, platonic relationship imaginable: a depressed and exhausted woman and an elderly, vulnerable man, played superbly by Charlotte Gainsbourg and Stellan Skarsgård.

Skarsgård is Seligman, a lonely old bachelor who discovers Joe (Gainsbourg) lying bruised, bleeding and semi-conscious near his apartment building. »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Review: The Poirot Collection

4 February 2014 11:10 PM, PST | Shadowlocked | See recent Shadowlocked news »

Mention the name Hercule Poirot and chances are that the first thing that pops into your mind is David Suchet’s moustachioed visage. Suchet, of course, portrayed Agatha Christie’s famous Belgian export for 24 years, from 1989 to 2013, during which time he starred in every major Poirot story that the author wrote. As great as these televisual treats were, though, I have very fond memories of the trio of Poirot movies that are included in this new Blu-ray collection.

Though I never saw them at the cinema, Murder On The Orient Express (1974), Death On The Nile (1978) and Evil Under The Sun (1982) always seemed to crop up on television whenever there was a Bank Holiday (on rotation with The Great Escape (1963) among others) and guaranteed that we as a family would sit together, glued to the screen, no matter how many times we’d seen them.

The first of these three movies, »

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001 | 1999

1-20 of 24 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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