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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2004

19 items from 2014


Rooney Was No Andy Hardy in Real Life: Longest Film Career Ever?

8 April 2014 6:15 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Mickey Rooney dead at 93: Four-time Oscar nominee, frequent Judy Garland co-star may have had the longest film career ever (photo: Mickey Rooney ca. 1940) Mickey Rooney, four-time Academy Award nominee and one of the biggest domestic box-office draws during the studio era, died of "natural causes" on Sunday, April 6, 2014, at his home in the Los Angeles suburb of North Hollywood. The Brooklyn-born Rooney (as Joseph Yule Jr., on September 23, 1920) had reportedly been in ill health for some time. He was 93. Besides his countless movies, and numerous television and stage appearances, Mickey Rooney was also known for his stormy private life, which featured boozing and gambling, some widely publicized family infighting (including his testifying in Congress in 2011 about elder abuse), his filing for bankruptcy in 1962 after having earned a reported $12 million (and then going bankrupt again in 1996), his eight marriages — including those to actresses Ava Gardner, Martha Vickers, and Barbara Ann Thomason »

- Andre Soares

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Mickey Rooney Gets Emotional, Reflects on His Career in One of His Final Interviews (Video)

6 April 2014 10:17 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Mickey Rooney, who died Sunday at age 93, gave one of his final interviews to Scott Feinberg, awards analyst at The Hollywood Reporter. In the extensive interview, Rooney at times became emotional while reflecting on his life and career. Photos: Mickey Rooney's Career in Pictures Among other topics, he explained the pros and cons of child stardom and how he felt that being a young actor robbed him of his childhood. He also reminisced about his days at MGM, working on the Andy Hardy movies opposite Judy Garland, Lana Turner and other actresses. Rooney also revealed the connection between his

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- THR Staff

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Off-Broadway’s “Nothing But Trash” a Real Treasure

11 March 2014 10:19 AM, PDT | The Backlot | See recent The Backlot news »

Rory Max Caplan (left) and Andy Halliday in Nothing But Trash

Photos source

One of the clichés of gay works of theater is that they often have to be considered “edgy” in order to be significant. Even though we’re at last past the point where gay plays must end tragically, the idea that gay works must still be in some way provocative or boundary-pushing persists. That’s one of the reasons why Nothing But Trash, now playing at Theater for the New City until March 23th, is such a pleasure to behold: it goes in the other direction, and does so exquisitely.

In a move from the Charles Busch playbook, Trash lovingly eviscerates the gee-whiz films of the 1950’s by mimicking the very specific cadence of the dialogue (and musical cues) while casting gay boys and drag queens as its main players. Even the straight boys are pretty much gay. »

- Tim O'Leary

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Berlin Film Review: ‘Black Coal, Thin Ice’

13 February 2014 2:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The spirits of Raymond Chandler and James M. Cain course through “Black Coal, Thin Ice,” a bleak but powerful, carefully controlled detective thriller in which — like all of the best noirs — there are no real heroes or villains, only various states of compromise. A most curious hybrid of genre movie and art film, drenched in neon and wintry industrial bleakness, this third feature by the gifted mainland Chinese director Diao Yinan reps a significant advance in scale and craftsmanship over his festival favorites “Uniform” (2003) and “Night Train” (2007), with the potential to penetrate modestly further into the commercial sector.

Diao, who began his career as a screenwriter for director Zhang Yang (“Shower,” “Spicy Love Soup”), first showed an affinity for noir in his debut pic, where an aimless young man working in his family’s laundry business took to impersonating a police officer. (In a sly nod to that film, the »

- Scott Foundas

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‘Come Back to the 5 & Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean’ and the false promise of 1980s America

29 January 2014 5:44 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Robert Altman’s work of the 1980s saw him exploring new stylistic trends as he ventured to adapt popular plays. These works stand in stark contrast with his earlier films as they were often secluded to single locations, with Altman’s sprawling vision of America confined to either a small interior space or even tied to a single character. The richness of Altman’s best work - The Long Goodbye, McCabe and Mrs. Miller and Nashville - stands in stark contrast with this new period of work, their sprawling narratives and settings seeming just a memory amid the very claustrophobic locales of his play adaptations. This transition in style, though, was motivated partially through practical needs that also mirrored his occasional shifts to television. The biggest catalyst in these lower-budget productions was the financial and critical struggles of his most recent work at the time, notably Popeye and HealtH. HealtH, »

- Justine Smith

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MGM’s Leo the Lion Gets His Paws Dirty to Celebrate 90th Anniversary

22 January 2014 1:22 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Leo the Lion became the first studio icon and wild animal to place his paw prints into the cement at the Tcl Chinese Theatre Wednesday morning.

On hand to commemorate the 90th anniversary of MGM Studios, Leo, known for his signature roar at the start of each MGM film, was joined by Chairman and CEO Gary Barber and Rocky Balboa himself, Sylvester Stallone.

After an introduction by the Tcl Chinese’s Alwyn Hight Kushner, Barber spoke about the company’s history and the many stars who have contributed to MGM’s legacy, including Stallone, Greta Garbo, Clark Gable, Judy Garland, Lana Turner, Mickey Rooney and Elizabeth Taylor. Barber also called attention to the fact that MGM is the only studio with back-to-back billion dollar films, thanks to the success of 2012’s “Skyfall” and “The Hobbit.”

“It’s an out-of-body experience and a true honor to represent this legacy of MGM, »

- Andrea Seikaly

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Meme: MPAA Screws “G.B.F”, Lance Bass Makes Some Music and Lohan Movie “Inconceivable”

21 January 2014 4:37 AM, PST | The Backlot | See recent The Backlot news »

Editor’s Note: Ed Kennedy is taking a much needed vacation, so we’re asking for help crowdsourcing today’s edition! Got a link, hot news item, Instagram pic etc. you think other readers would enjoy? As long as it’s P.G. rated and safe for work, please share in the comments. Here’s a few items to get the ball rolling…

Sweet indie gay film G.B.F. (read our review here) was given an R rating by the MPAA, and director Darren Stein is not happy about that: “I always thought of G.B.F. as a PG-13 movie, but we were given an R “For Sexual References” while not having a single F-bomb, hint of nudity or violence in the film. Perhaps the ratings box should more accurately read ‘For Homosexual References’ or ‘Too Many Scenes of Gay Teens Kissing.’ I look forward to a world where queer teens can »

- Dennis Ayers

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Labeouf, Bay Remembered: 104-Year-Old Double Oscar Winner and Birthday Celebrant Ignored at the Globes

14 January 2014 6:28 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Luise Rainer today: As of last Sunday, the two-time Best Actress Oscar winner is 104 years old Inevitably, the Transformers movies’ director Michael Bay (who recently had an on-camera "meltdown" after a teleprompter stopped working at the Consumer Electronics Show) and the Transformers movies’ star Shia Labeouf (who was recently accused of plagiarism) were mentioned — or rather, blasted, in current media parlance — at the 2014 Golden Globe awards show, held this past Sunday, January 12, at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills. Left unmentioned, however, was London resident and two-time Best Actress Oscar winner Luise Rainer (The Great Ziegfeld, The Good Earth) — who just happened to turn 104 years old on the day of the Golden Globes ceremony. (Photo: Luise Rainer in the mid-1930s.) Luise Rainer movies Of course, quite possibly none of the people attending the Golden Globes had ever heard of — let alone seen a movie featuring — Luise Rainer (or »

- Andre Soares

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'Honeymooners' Actor Frank Marth Dies at 91

12 January 2014 11:01 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Frank Marth, a veteran character actor and member of Jackie Gleason's stock company on The Honeymooners, died Sunday of congestive heart failure and Alzheimer’s disease in Rancho Mirage, Calif., a family friend told The Hollywood Reporter. He was 91. Often cast as an authority figure, Marth appeared on scores of TV shows and in many films during his more than 50 years in show business. He played a detective in Madame X (1966) opposite Lana Turner, a police lieutenant working with Richard Widmark in Madigan (1968), an Air Force man in the Gregory Peck film Marooned (1969) and a Nazi

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- Mike Barnes

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Ted Richmond, Producer of ‘Papillon,’ Dies at 103

6 January 2014 5:59 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Producer Ted Richmond, who produced more than 60 movies from the 1940s through the 1970s including 1973 thriller “Papillon” (pictured), died in Paris on Dec. 23. He was 103.

The 1973 hit “Papillon,” starring Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman, was one of Richmond’s most successful films.

For 40 years, working for Columbia Pictures and then Universal Intl., he produced movies in a variety of genres. There were Westerns such as “The Cimarron Kid,” starring Audie Murphy, and “Return of the Seven,” as well as comedies such as “Francis Joins the Wacs,” starring Donald O’Connor. Richmond was also an uncredited producer on the Elvis Presley pic “It Happened at the World’s Fair.”

In the 1950s he partnered with his close friend Tyrone Power to form Copa Prods. The company’s first movie, “Count Three and Pray,” introduced Joanne Woodward to films. In 1959, during the filming of “Solomon and Sheba,” Richmond was devastated when Power, »

- Carmel Dagan

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Juanita Moore obituary

3 January 2014 12:55 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Oscar-nominated actor who brought sensitivity and warmth to her most famous role in Imitation of Life

From its earliest days, Hollywood, which has always lagged behind wider social advances, limited the roles of black actors to stock, wide-eyed cowards, simpletons or servants, often referred to as "uncles" and "mammies". Juanita Moore, who has died aged 99, suffered from this limitation by having to play maids throughout most of her long career. However, Moore could have echoed what Hattie McDaniel, the first African-American actor to win an Academy Award, once said: "Why should I complain about making $700 a week playing a maid? If I didn't, I'd be making $7 a week being one."

Where McDaniel as Mammy, Scarlett O'Hara's lovable, sassy servant in Gone With the Wind (1939) was the apotheosis of the black maid, Moore's Oscar-nominated portrayal of Annie Johnson, housekeeper to the glamorous Broadway star Lora Meredith (Lana Turner) in Douglas Sirk »

- Ronald Bergan

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Juanita Moore obituary

3 January 2014 4:01 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Oscar-nominated actor who brought sensitivity and warmth to her most famous role in Imitation of Life

From its earliest days, Hollywood, which has always lagged behind wider social advances, limited the roles of black actors to stock, wide-eyed cowards, simpletons or servants, often referred to as "uncles" and "mammies". Juanita Moore, who has died aged 99, suffered from this limitation by having to play maids throughout most of her long career. However, Moore could have echoed what Hattie McDaniel, the first African-American actor to win an Academy Award, once said: "Why should I complain about making $700 a week playing a maid? If I didn't, I'd be making $7 a week being one."

Where McDaniel as Mammy, Scarlett O'Hara's lovable, sassy servant in Gone With the Wind (1939) was the apotheosis of the black maid, Moore's Oscar-nominated portrayal of Annie Johnson, housekeeper to the glamorous Broadway star Lora Meredith (Lana Turner) in Douglas Sirk »

- Ronald Bergan

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Goodbye Juanita & Martha

2 January 2014 8:42 PM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

It feels like Oscar's upcoming "In Memorium" segment this year is going to be extra exhaustingly sad. One of the tiny reasons among many larger ones that I wish they hadn't moved the Honorary Oscar to another event is that the eldest artists of the cinema shouldn't only be viewed through the prism of final goodbyes, you know? This past week we lost two more actresses, both of whom might feel right at home when they hear heavenly choirs.

Juanita Moore and Lana Turner and their screen daughters in "Imitation of Life"

When I think of Juanita Moore (1922-2014) and her classic Oscar-nominated performance in the Douglas Sirk melodrama Imitation of Life (1959), I nearly always think of a scene she isn't even in! My mind always rushes to her character's own funeral. 

Is there a sung funereal performance more moving than Mahalia Jackson's "Trouble of the World"?

Trouble of »

- NATHANIEL R

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Juanita Moore, star of Imitation of Life, dies aged 99

2 January 2014 4:07 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The actor who was Oscar-nominated for her role alongside Lana Turner in Douglas Sirk's 1959 melodrama has died at home

Juanita Moore, the Oscar-nominated star of Imitation of Life, has died at the age of 99. The actor, who played alongside Lana Turner in Douglas Sirk's 1959 race drama, died at home, according to her grandson, actor Kirk Kelleykahn.

In Imitation of Life, Moore played a black single mother who befriends Turner's character, a widow whose dreams of becoming a Broadway star are complicated by her responsibility for her own young child. Susan Kohner, who played Moore's daughter Sarah Jane as a teenager in the film, told The Hollywood Reporter that Moore was "a lovely human being with a wonderful sense of humour".

Both Kohner and Moore were nominated for the best supporting actress Oscar in 1959. Moore was only the fifth black woman to be nominated for the award. She lost out to Shelley Winters, »

- Henry Barnes

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Oscar-Nominated Actress Featured in One of Universal's Biggest Blockbusters Dead at 99

1 January 2014 4:43 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Oscar-nominated ‘Imitation of Life’ actress Juanita Moore has died Juanita Moore, Best Supporting Actress Academy Award nominee for the 1959 blockbuster Imitation of Life, died on New Year’s Day 2014 at her home in Los Angeles. According to various online sources, Juanita Moore (born on October 19, 1922) was 91; her step-grandson, actor Kirk Kahn, said she was 99. (Photo: Juanita Moore in the late ’50s. See also: Juanita Moore and Susan Kohner photos at the 50th anniversary screening of Imitation of Life at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.) Juanita Moore movies The Los Angeles-born Juanita Moore began her show business career as a chorus girl at New York City’s Cotton Club. According to the IMDb, Moore was an extra/bit player in a trio of films of the ’40s, including Vincente Minnelli’s all-black musical Cabin in the Sky (1942) and Elia Kazan’s socially conscious melodrama Pinky (1949), in which Jeanne Crain plays a (very, »

- Andre Soares

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'Imitation of Life' Oscar nominee dies

1 January 2014 3:30 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

New York (AP) — Juanita Moore, a groundbreaking actress and an Academy Award nominee for her role as Lana Turner's black friend in the classic weeper "Imitation of Life," has died.   Actor Kirk Kelleykahn, her grandson, said that Moore collapsed and died Wednesday at her home in Los Angeles. She was 99, according to Kelleykahn. Accounts of her age have differed over the years.   Moore was only the fifth black performer to be nominated for an Oscar, receiving the nod for the glossy Douglas Sirk film that became a big hit and later gained a cult following. The 1959 »

- AP Staff

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'Imitation of Life' Actress Juanita Moore Dies

1 January 2014 3:24 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

New York – Juanita Moore, a groundbreaking actress and an Academy Award nominee for her role as Lana Turner's character's black friend in the classic weeper Imitation of Life, has died. Actor Kirk Kelleykahn, her grandson, said that Moore collapsed and died Wednesday at her home in Los Angeles. She was 99, according to Kelleykahn. Accounts of her age have differed over the years. Moore was only the fifth black performer to be nominated for an Oscar, receiving the nod for the glossy Douglas Sirk film that became a big hit and later gained a cult following. The 1959 tearjerker, based

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- The Associated Press, Philiana Ng

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Oscar-nominated actress Juanita Moore dies at 99

1 January 2014 3:23 PM, PST | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

Juanita Moore, a groundbreaking actress and an Academy Award nominee for her role as Lana Turner’s black friend in the classic weeper Imitation of Life, has died.

Actor Kirk Kelleykahn, her grandson, said that Moore collapsed and died Wednesday at her home in Los Angeles. She was 99, according to Kelleykahn. Accounts of her age have differed over the years.

Moore was only the fifth black performer to be nominated for an Oscar, receiving the nod for the glossy Douglas Sirk film that became a big hit and later gained a cult following. The 1959 tearjerker, based on a Fannie Hurst »

- Associated Press

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Juanita Moore, Oscar-Nominated Actress in Imitation of Life, Dies at 99

1 January 2014 2:05 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Juanita Moore, an Oscar nominee for her role in the 1959 big-screen melodrama Imitation of Life, died at her Los Angeles home on Wednesday, reports Variety. She was 99. Moore, who made more than 30 films, was the fifth African-American to receive an Academy Award nomination - a Best Supporting Actress nod for playing Annie Johnson, a housekeeper (to Lana Turner) whose light-skinned daughter (Susan Kohner) passes for white. "Annie was a good role for me," Moore said in a 2005 interview. "I have been in a lot of pictures. However, most of them consisted of my opening doors for white people." Although Moore »

- K.C. Blumm

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2004

19 items from 2014


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