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1-20 of 41 items from 2010   « Prev | Next »


Are These The 7 Greatest Films Of All Time?

25 October 2010 1:20 PM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Over at The Guardian and Observer headquarters, a panel of hard-hitting film buffs think they’ve come up with the 7 greatest movies the world has ever seen. Top of the list is Roman Polanski’s fantastic Chinatown, with film critic, Peter Bradshaw, commenting that it was “a powerful piece of mythmaking, [and] a brilliant evocation of Los Angeles as a spiritual desert.”

Here’s the full list with the remaining six. What do you think? Are they right? And more importantly, where exactly is The Godfather in all of this?

1. Chinatown (Roman Polanski, 1974)

2. Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)

3. Andrei Rublev (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1966)

4. Annie Hall (Woody Allen, 1976)

5. 2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)

6. Brief Encounter (David Lean, 1945)

7. Apocalypse Now (Francis Ford Coppola, 1979)

Source: The Guardian

»

- Laura Stackhouse

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Chinatown voted best film ever

25 October 2010 5:01 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Roman Polanski's 'neo-noir' starring Jack Nicholson and a killer last line takes first place in poll of Guardian and Observer critics

The best romance films

The best horror films

The best crime films

The best comedy films

The best action and war films

The best sci-fi and fantasy films

The best drama and art fllms

It's the film that cemented Jack Nicholson's reputation as the best American actor of his generation, and it was the last film Roman Polanski would make in the Us before he fled the country in disgrace. Now, almost 40 years later, their 1974 release Chinatown has now been named the greatest film ever made.

The Chandleresque "neo-noir", with an Oscar-winning script by Robert Towne and a superlative performance by Nicholson as detective Jj Gittes, was voted into first place by a panel of Guardian and Observer critics.

Chinatown beat six other films in a shortlist »

- Andrew Pulver

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Chinatown Voted the Best Film of All Time

25 October 2010 3:49 AM, PDT | WorstPreviews.com | See recent Worst Previews news »

A panel of The Guardian and Observer critics voted on the seven greatest films of all time, choosing Jack Nicholson's "Chinatown," which was the last movie Roman Polanski directed in the Us before fleeing the country. The Guardian's film critic, Peter Bradshaw, said that "Chinatown" is "such a powerful piece of mythmaking, a brilliant evocation of Los Angeles as a spiritual desert." The Observer's Philip French considers it a movie of "near perfection," ending "unforgettably with the line 'Forget it Jake, it's Chinatown.'" Check out the full list below, which doesn't include "The Godfather" or anything before the 1980s. 1. Chinatown (Roman Polanski, 1974) 2. Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960) 3. Andrei Rublev (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1966) 4. Annie Hall (Woody Allen, 1976) 5. 2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968) 6. Brief Encounter (David Lean, 1945) 7. Apocalypse Now (Francis Ford Coppola, 1979) »

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‘Chinatown’ listed the greatest movie ever

24 October 2010 11:53 PM, PDT | RealBollywood.com | See recent RealBollywood news »

Sydney, Oct 25 – After 36 years of its release in 1974, ‘Chinatown’ has now been voted as the greatest film ever made.

The Chandleresque “neo-noir”, with an Oscar-winning script by Robert Towne and a superlative performance by Nicholson as detective Jj Gittes, was voted into first place by a panel of Guardian and Observer critics.

Chinatown beat six other films in a shortlist drawn from the recently published seven-part newspaper series on “The Greatest Films of All Time”.

Equal second were Alfred Hitchock’s ‘Psycho’ (from the horror section) and Andrei Tarkovsky’s ‘Andrei Rublev’ (leading film the arthouse section).

Guardian. »

- News

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Chinatown the greatest film ever, say Guardian and Observer critics

22 October 2010 10:13 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

A late honour for Jack Nicholson and Roman Polanski, with Hitchcock's Psycho coming in second

It's the film that cemented Jack Nicholson's reputation as the best American actor of his generation, and it was the last film Roman Polanski would make in the Us before he fled the country in disgrace. Now, 36 years later, their 1974 release Chinatown has been voted the greatest film ever made.

The Chandleresque "neo-noir", with an Oscar-winning script by Robert Towne and a superlative performance by Nicholson as detective Jj Gittes, was voted into first place by a panel of Guardian and Observer critics. Chinatown beat six other films in a shortlist drawn from the recently-published seven-part series of The Greatest Films of All Time, which concluded today. Equal second were Alfred Hitchock's Psycho (from the horror section) and Andrei Tarkovsky's Andrei Rublev (the leading film in the arthouse section).

The Guardian's film critic, »

- Andrew Pulver

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Solaris: No 6

21 October 2010 3:49 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Andrei Tarkovsky, 1972

Andrei Tarkovsky started work on an adaptation of Stanisław Lem's philosophical science-fiction novel in 1968 in an attempt to find a popular cinematic subject. After the usual labyrinthine negotations with the Soviet authorities over the script, what emerged was a space film unlike anything before or since.

Lem's novel posited the existence of solaristics; the study of an outlying star system that had bizarre effects on human psychology. Tarkovsky took this idea, and turned it into a dreamlike interrogation of faith, memory and the transfiguring power of love.

Tarkovsky begins his version of the story with some of the most magically earthbound images ever filmed, as his protagonist, a psychologist called Kelvin (Donatas Banionis), contemplates his garden. He then embarks on a voyage to the space station circling Solaris, there to investigate the reports of eccentric behaviour of previous visitors. Kelvin undergoes an ordeal by memory, as Solaris' »

- Andrew Pulver

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The greatest films of all time: Arthouse

20 October 2010 4:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This is a red rag to a number of different bulls. Lovers of what's called arthouse cinema resent the label for being derisive and philistine. And those who detest it bristle at the implication that there is no artistry or intelligence in mainstream entertainment.

For many, the stereotypical arthouse film is Ingmar Bergman's The Seventh Seal. Sergei Eisenstein's Battleship Potemkin was a classic art film from the 1920s and Luis Buñuel investigated cinema's potential for surreality like no one before or since. The Italian neorealists applied the severity of art to a representation of society and the French New Wave iconoclastically brought a self-deconstructing critical awareness to film-making. Yasujiro Ozu conveyed a transcendental simplicity in his work. Andrei Tarkovsky and Michelangelo Antonioni achieved a meditative beauty, while David Lynch and John Cassavetes demonstrated an American reflex to the genre.

Arthouse is dismissed as the connoisseur's elite fetish; others find it, »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Andrei Rublev: Archive review

20 October 2010 3:54 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

From the Guardian, 16 August 1973

Tarkovsky's film Andrei Rublev switches from black and white into colour for the last five of its 146 minutes, and the camera tracks quietly over Rublev's masterpiece, "Abraham's three angels". This is the first we see of the great icon painter's work, yet Tarkovsky makes his film one of the most convincing portrayals in art of an artist; he succeeds by concentrating on the man's humanity.

It may be the theme of the individual bucking the system that has brought about the film's strange fate. It won a prize at Cannes in 1969 then disappeared. It has been announced on occasions since, but failed to appear. Other than the press screening at the Nft this week, no shows in London have been planned. Maybe its producers, Mosfilm, are waiting for reactions to its single screening at the – dare one say? – relatively obscure Edinburgh International film festival to decide »

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Andrei Rublev: No 1

20 October 2010 3:54 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Andrei Tarkovsky, 1966

Viewers and critics always have their personal favourites, but some films achieve a masterpiece status that becomes unanimously agreed upon – something that's undoubtedly true of Andrei Rublev, even though it's a film that people often feel they don't, or won't get. It is 205 minutes long (in its fullest version), in Russian, and in black and white. Few characters are clearly identified, little actually happens, and what does happen isn't necessarily in chronological order. Its subject is a 15th-century icon painter and national hero, yet we never see him paint, nor does he do anything heroic. In many of the film's episodes, he is not present at all, and in the latter stages, he takes a vow of silence. But in a sense, there is nothing to "get" about Andrei Rublev. It is not a film that needs to be processed or even understood, only experienced and wondered at. »

- Steve Rose

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Where Everyone Has Gone Before #14: 'Solaris' (2002)

15 October 2010 1:02 PM, PDT | Cinematical | See recent Cinematical news »

Filed under: Features, Cinematical

I consider myself a pretty serious movie fan, but the simple fact of the matter is that I miss stuff. Famous and interesting stuff. But not for long!

Welcome to Where Everyone Has Gone Before, the column where I continue my film education before your very eyes. I will seek out and watch all of the movies I know I should have seen by now. I will first "review" the movie before I've watched it, based entirely on its reputation. Then I will give the movie a fair chance and actually watch it. You will laugh at me, you may condemn me, but you will never say I didn't try.

The Film: 'Solaris' (2002), Dir. Steven Soderbergh

Starring: George "Batman" Clooney, Natascha McElhone, Viola Davis, Jeremy Davies and George Clooney's posterior.

Why I Haven't Seen It Until Now: Well, I didn't want to see »

- Jacob Hall

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Where Everyone Has Gone Before #13: 'Solaris' (1972)

8 October 2010 9:50 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Filed under: Features, Movies We Love, Sci-Fi, Cinematical

I consider myself a pretty serious movie fan, but the simple fact of the matter is that I miss stuff. Famous and interesting stuff. But not for long!

Welcome to Where Everyone Has Gone Before, the column where I continue my film education before your very eyes. I will seek out and watch all of the movies I know I should have seen by now. I will first "review" the movie before I've watched it, based entirely on its reputation. Then I will give the movie a fair chance and actually watch it. You will laugh at me, you may condemn me, but you will never say I didn't try.

The Film: 'Solaris' (1972), Dir. Andrei Tarkovsky

Starring: Natalya Bondachuk, Donatas Baniounis, Juri Jarvet and other Russian people with names I don't have the ability to pronounce.

Why I Haven't Seen »

- Jacob Hall

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Where Everyone Has Gone Before #13: 'Solaris' (1972)

8 October 2010 9:50 AM, PDT | Cinematical | See recent Cinematical news »

Filed under: Features, Movies We Love, Sci-Fi, Cinematical

I consider myself a pretty serious movie fan, but the simple fact of the matter is that I miss stuff. Famous and interesting stuff. But not for long!

Welcome to Where Everyone Has Gone Before, the column where I continue my film education before your very eyes. I will seek out and watch all of the movies I know I should have seen by now. I will first "review" the movie before I've watched it, based entirely on its reputation. Then I will give the movie a fair chance and actually watch it. You will laugh at me, you may condemn me, but you will never say I didn't try.

The Film: 'Solaris' (1972), Dir. Andrei Tarkovsky

Starring: Natalya Bondachuk, Donatas Baniounis, Juri Jarvet and other Russian people with names I don't have the ability to pronounce.

Why I Haven't Seen »

- Jacob Hall

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The American Review

8 October 2010 6:04 AM, PDT | RealBollywood.com | See recent RealBollywood news »

Movie Review: “The American”; Cast: George Clooney, Irina Björklund, Paolo Bonacelli, Giorgio Gobbi; Director: Anton Corbijn; Rating: **** – a sculpture in time.

Cinema, as Andrei Tarkovsky has elucidated, is a temporal medium, by which he meant that a filmmaker sculpts time through images to evoke emotions in the viewer. It is heartening to see a filmmaker get it right in his first attempt. “The American” is a film of quiet restraint meant to be watched for the beauty of its aesthetics.

Cinematic tension is not necessary in a fast-paced story and “The American” shows why. Jack (Clooney) is an assassin, who after a bid on his life, hides in a small town in Italy and. »

- realbollywood

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Modern Maestros: Aleksandr Sokurov

23 September 2010 4:44 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Maestro: Aleksandr Sokruov

Known For: critically acclaimed Russian art films

Influences: Tarkovsky, Tarkovsky and... well Tarkovsky

Masterpieces: Russian Ark

Disasters: none

Better than you remember: none, or all

Box Office: over 2 mil for Russian Ark

Art cinema is alive and well (and not as difficult to watch as the naysayers keep naysaying), and the lovers of such cinema are thankful that rather prolific Russian Aleksandr Sokurov has reached a point of notability where those of us who live in the western world can anticipate all of his films getting a release date (now if we could only do something about that back catalog.)  Sokurov, a long time pupil and friend to contemplative, languorous, spiritual poet filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky, the man who brought us Solaris, continues his mentor's work on a regular basis, churning out films that utilize the camera, and occasionally video to capture a unique perspective on the human condition, »

- Robert

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The Wizard of Link

29 August 2010 4:25 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Journalistic Skepticism What are the 20 Best Movie Weddings? I'm surprised the AFI hasn't made this list yet.

Mind of a Suspicious Kind looks back over Danny Boyle's filmography prior to the release of 127 Hours

Totally Looks Like Miss Hattie (Despicable Me) = Dolores Umbridge. Huh. I do see it now.

Movies Kick Ass compares The Wizard of Oz with... Andrei Tarkovsky's Stalker?

Self Styled Siren has a really interesting post on the Shirley Temple / John Ford film Wee Willie Winkie (1937) and...

Self Styled Siren ...another post on the attendant hulabaloo at the time by way of controversial critic/ screenwriter/ novelist Graham Greene who called wee Temple "a fancy little piece" in a review that prompted litigation.

Coming Soon First photos from the upcoming 647th film adaptation of The Three Musketeers (2011). This one stars Mads Mikkelsen and Milla Jovovich.

Antagony & Ecstasy reviews Cairo Time. I love this bit. Which is »

- NATHANIEL R

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The films you need to see twice to wrap your head around

19 August 2010 12:36 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Some movies simply demand repeat viewings, and a second watch often reveals new details you’d missed the first time. Here’s our pick of ten movies that deserve to be watched twice…

The vast majority of films produced are made purely for money, and this isn't really all that surprising when cash is still very much considered king in Hollywood. Nevertheless, every now and then a film comes out that commands your attention, engages your senses, and stays with you for quite sometime after it's finished.

Some call it art, others proclaim it the work of a genius and some, rather more simply, refer to it as a decent film. Either way, it doesn't really matter how you label them, one simple fact unites them all: some films are so good you have to see them at least twice, whether it's to understand the complexities of the plot, or »

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Adrian Sitaru Has 'Best Intentions' for Sophomore Project

10 August 2010 5:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

At thirty-nine, although he has made only one single feature film, Romanian filmmaker Adrian Sitaru is already internationally known. He won the Leopards of Tomorrow section of the 2007 Locarno International Film Festival with his short Waves (Valuri) and for his first feature – Hooked (Pescuit sportiv), he received the Special Jury Award and the Best Actress prize for Ioana Flora and Maria Dinulescu at the 2008 Thessaloniki Film Festival. Now, Adrian Sitaru is preparing his second feature. From Love with Best Intentions tells the story of a 33-year-old man, named Alex, whose mother suffers a stroke. "Although his mother seems ok, Alex becomes more and more irrational, antsy and paranoiac. This happens because, from love, with best intentions, we’re getting ignorant, blind and starting to make mistakes." explains the director. Sitaru continues his collaboration director of photography Adrian Silişteanu and when asked about the visual imprint of the future film he mentioned that, »

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Review: 1

7 August 2010 2:07 PM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

[So, yes, I am still catching up on Fantasia Reviews, but now in hindsight, the Camera Lucida program was very much a highlight of the festival, featuring the most challenging and quirky genre films including Rubber, Sell Out!, Air Doll, and this film from Hungarian production designer turned director, Pater Sparrow.  Along with the Serbian Sidebar, there were lots of tasty and unusual treats that stretched even the already offbeat tastes of the massive Montreal genre festival in its 2010 edition.]

So this is one possible outcome when a film, here a science fiction think-piece, is based on an essay?  That essay (or rather a short story taking the form of a piece of criticism) was penned by eastern bloc author Stanislaw Lem perhaps best known as the author of book used for Andrei Tarkovsky's Solyaris (an adaptation the author was not particularly happy with, albeit it is one of the key films of science fiction cinema).  I wonder what Lem, if he were alive today would have to say about 1.  Would he like the ponderously dense wordplay within the film a hybrid of voice-over narration, expository information overload and satirical potshots at a variety of societal institutions including book publishing, news-media and shady governmental secret police.  1 is a curious beast because it does make attempts to 'show-don't-tell' but cannot figure out any coherent way to do so, so it ultimately has to talk-talk-talk, »

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Top 15 Cerebral Sci-Fi Films

20 July 2010 1:14 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

As Inception warped our minds and showed us a new generation of sci-fi, Christopher Nolan has admitted to “plundering cinematic history” and using many references while creating his latest film. The films on list below are not only heavily referenced in Inception, but our favorite cerebral sci-fi films. 

15. Akira (1988) (dir. Katsuhiro Ôtomo)

Akira is a hard pill to swallow. You may not take it all in at the first stab, but once you let your mind go and get fully involved, it’s a wonderful experience. Watching the anime makes you feel as if you are transported inside of Manga comic book. It’s a gorgeous world filled with cerebral ideas. While it is a bit of a mess, it’s a great mess. You can enjoy it as simply an action movie or, the preferable, as a cerebral experience. – Jack G.

14. Stalker (1979) (dir. Andrei Tarkovsky)

Andrei Tarkovsky’s brilliant »

- Jordan Raup

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Reader's Review:Inception

19 July 2010 10:45 AM, PDT | DearCinema.com | See recent DearCinema.com news »

‘Reality’ is a subject that thinkers cannot but speculate about and cinema has also followed with its own explorations. Especially in more recent times, with advancements in technology, film directors have been enabled to translate ideas of a more abstract nature into something tangible. Over time, this has encouraged younger filmmakers to focus on original, ‘never-before-conceived’ ideas. Over the last decade, the Matrix Trilogy took the world by storm. These films (primarily the first one) played an important role in creating a new standard for the ‘conceptual’ cinema that followed. This, combined with the rapidly changing world – now equipped with facebook, twitter and several other tools for its virtual extension - subject matter dealing with ‘identity’ and ‘reality’ became highly popular. Plots were no longer orderly because the greatness of ideas needed to be demonstrated and the audience needed to be convinced that these ideas were complex. But with more »

- Bharat Mirle

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1-20 of 41 items from 2010   « Prev | Next »


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