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1-20 of 37 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


First Images of Saoirse Ronan in Greta Gerwig’s Directorial Debut ‘Lady Bird’

14 August 2017 3:20 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

While she co-directed Nights and Weekends nearly a decade ago with Joe Swanberg, Greta Gerwig’s first solo outing as director will be arriving this fall. Picked up A24 for a release this November, Lady Bird follows a mother-daughter relationship starring Laurie Metcalf and Saoirse Ronan. Ahead of a release, the first images have now arrived, featuring our leads.

Likely to premiere at Telluride before heading to Toronto and Nyff, Gerwig has worked with a number of talented directors — including Noah Baumbach, Mia Hansen-Løve, Whit Stillman, Todd Solondz, and Rebecca Miller — so it’ll be curious to see what form this debut takes. Check out the new images above and below, along with Nyff‘s synopsis.

Greta Gerwig’s directorial debut is a portrait of an artistically inclined young woman (Saoirse Ronan) trying to define herself in the shadow of her mother (Laurie Metcalf) and searching for an escape route from her hometown of Sacramento. »

- Jordan Raup

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‘Only Living Boy in New York’: Marc Webb Says He Needed to Direct Something on a Smaller Scale After ‘Spider-Man’

8 August 2017 10:21 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

At Monday night’s New York premiere of the indie drama “The Only Living Boy in New York,” which took place at the Museum of Modern Art, the film’s director, Marc Webb, told Variety that after working on “The Amazing Spider-Man” and its sequel, he was happy to take a break and helm something on a smaller scale. Though, “if they’ll have me, I’ll return to doing bigger movies in the future.”

He then elaborated on the need for a change. “I needed a little bit of that after the ‘Spider-Man’ thing, where there’s so many expectations,” he said. “This was really fun to make, and low stress. It was a bunch of people in a room messing around, having a lot of fun.”

The premiere was held by Amazon Studios and Roadside Attractions, and Webb said he appreciates that Amazon lets their movies have a theatrical run before they hit the Amazon »

- Michael Tedder

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Amazon Moves Into Self-Distribution With Woody Allen’s ‘Wonder Wheel’ (Exclusive)

27 July 2017 8:30 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Amazon is moving into self-distributing its own movies, putting it on the path to becoming a full-fledged film studio.

The company will release Woody Allen’s “Wonder Wheel” without bringing in a distribution partner. The film opens in theaters on Dec. 1, 2017, and is expected to be an Oscar contender.

Amazon began buying and producing films in 2015, working with filmmakers such as Whit Stillman and Spike Lee, and earning Academy Awards for last year’s “Manchester By the Sea” and “The Salesman.” However, it has relied on independent studios such as Bleecker Street, Roadside Attractions, and Lionsgate to bring its film to theaters.

Related

Amazon, Retail Behemoth, Taking Smaller Steps Into Hollywood

With their deep pockets and big ambitions, Amazon and Netflix have upended the film distribution landscape, although they have taken different approaches. Netflix is solely focused on servicing its streaming service subscribers. Amazon believes in premiering movies in theaters before offering them on its Prime digital »

- Brent Lang

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Exclusive: Stream The Award-Winning Comedy Short ‘Satan Has A Bushy Tail’

26 July 2017 7:19 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Every so often, we like to shine a light on rising talent, and today we’re happy to bring some attention to Louis Paxton. The emerging Scottish filmmaker has a number of short works to his name, but it’s “Satan With A Bushy Tail” that has made the biggest impact to date — and with good reason.

Starring Tom Bennett (who you might know from his hilarious supporting turn in Whit Stillman‘s “Love & Friendship“) and veteran Richard Durden, and produced by Chiara Ventura, this clever buddy comedy follows Hugh, recently separated from his wife, who goes to stay with his newly widowed grandfather, Derek.

Continue reading Exclusive: Stream The Award-Winning Comedy Short ‘Satan Has A Bushy Tail’ at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Chloë Sevigny and Her Mom Don’t Talk About ‘The Brown Bunny,’ and 7 Other Wild Stories From the Indie Actress’ Career

22 June 2017 11:04 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Few acting resumes include as many visionary, boundary-pushing auteur filmmakers as Chloë Sevigny’s. A selected list of the directors she’s worked with could easily fill an IndieWire top ten: Harmony Korine, Vincent Gallo, Lars Von Trier, Whit Stillman, Kimberly Peirce, Olivier Assayas, and David Fincher — to name a few. In fact, as IndieWire co-founder Eugene Hernandez put it at a sit-down with the actress at the Provincetown International Film Festival last weekend, Sevigny was at the epicenter of the independent film renaissance of the late 1990s and early 2000s that inspired IndieWire’s creation in the first place.

Read More: Why Chloe Sevigny Waited 20 Years To Make Her Directorial Debut With The Female-Friendly ‘Kitty

“It was the work of Chloe and so many of her collaborators…that inspired the site we created. So without even knowing it, Chloe, you were part of what helped inspire us to do what we did at IndieWire,” said Hernandez in his introduction.

Sevigny was in Provincetown showing her short film, “Kitty,” the actress’ first foray into directing. It’s a visually lush and fantastical film based on a short story by Paul Bowles, whose work once led her to travel to Marrakech with Korine in the mid-’90s, “Just kind of following in his footsteps.” As the festival presented her with their Excellence in Acting Award, Sevigny and Hernandez sat down for a career-spanning talk that included some eyebrow-raising anecdotes from her days working with indie cinema’s most lauded (and eccentric) directors.

Read More: Sofia Coppola On Female Sexuality In ‘The Beguiled’ And Why She Hopes Gay Men Find Colin Farrell Sexy

Here are seven things you may not have known about Sevigny’s most memorable films, and some of the greatest (and most controversial) indies of the last twenty years, according to her:

1. Before “Boys Don’t Cry,” Drew Barrymore wanted to play Brandon Teena, and she asked Harmony Korine to direct it. 

Drew Barrymore had actually approached Harmony and she wanted to play [Brandon Teena] and she wanted me to play Lana in her version. There were some weird initial meetings around that, which obviously didn’t go very far. She sent in these kind of Herb Ritts photos of herself done up as a boy. She looked really attractive, but it wasn’t gonna work. And then I actually went and auditioned for the [Brandon Teena] part. Kimberly Peirce said, ‘You’ve never wanted to be a boy, have you?’ And I said, ‘No,’ and she was like, ‘Why don’t you come back in and try out for the other part?’ So I did, and I got it.”

2. Sarah Polley was Kimberly Peirce’s first choice to play Lana in “Boys Don’t Cry.”

“I only got the part because Sarah Polley passed. That happened to me a lot in the ’90s. She got a lot of parts that I wanted.”

3. The reaction to that infamous blow job scene in Vincent Gallo’s “The Brown Bunny” still haunts her.

“I thought it would just kind of play to an art house audience, I don’t know why I thought it would just go under the radar. Vincent’s a real character. I love ‘Buffalo 66.’ I put my faith in him, believed in him. He’s also very seductive, as you can imagine… I think it was a way of kind of reclaiming myself, which sounds odd, but after the celebrity and stuff, being like: ‘No, that’s not who I am, I’m this other thing, and this is what I stand for.’ Or wanting to push the envelope. Like John [Waters], who’s here.” Sevigny gestured to Waters, who called out from the audience: “I loved the ‘The Brown Bunny’! The insects on the windshield…”

Read More: ‘Lizzie’: First Look at Kristen Stewart and Chloe Sevigny in Gothic Historical Murder Mystery

4. “The Brown Bunny” didn’t hurt her career, but it did hurt some relationships. 

“I got my first studio film after that. I’d never been offered a studio film. It was ‘Zodiac.’ I don’t think it really hurt me, necessarily. I mean, it hurt me, in a lot of ways… Some relationships have had trouble with it. Of course, my mom and I don’t talk about it.”

5. Whit Stillman is terrifying.

“He’s very precise, and he also likes to do things a lot… It becomes surreal. Not as much as Fincher — he does full takes. Whit just wants you to say one line or one word again and again and again in a series. It’s terrifying. So scared of that man. And yet I keep going back. Glutton for punishment.”

6. Lars Von Trier spanked her on the set of “Dogville” (often). 

“I think that Lars tortures the main actresses, and the supporting players get a free ride. He was really into spanking me. But in a playful way. He’d always tease me, like I had to be punished. And he knew I was into Black metal so he was always teasing me about like going off and burning churches. We had a funny rapport. But I think he was harder on Nicole [Kidman].”

7. The Chloe videos hurt her feelings. 

“Ugh, I have a really complicated relationship with those. I don’t want to say I’m offended, ’cause that’s such a strong word. But I don’t enjoy them. I think because he’s a comedian. If he was more of a drag performer, I would feel like less – they hurt my feelings. Maybe I should be tougher, I don’t know. But they do.”

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- Jude Dry

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Criterion Now – Episode 19 – Best Films of the 21st Century, Dheepan, Wong Kar Wai, Revenge Films

13 June 2017 12:51 PM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Aaron is joined by Jon Laubinger, a superfan of the show and yet another cinephile from the great city of Boston. He is about to leave for Sweden for Bergman Week, so he may be the most envied guest of all time. We exchanged lists of our favorite films of the 21st century, talked about Dheepan, revenge films, David Lynch, Wong Kar Wai, and we speculated on what the upcoming September announcements could be.

Episode Links Bergman Week NY Times – Top 25 Best Films of the 21st Century Aaron’s Top Films of the 21st Century Jon’s Top Films of the 21st Century Twin Peaks Podcast Riverrun Film Festival – Memories of Underdevelopment Blu-ray – WB Titles Going Out of Print Whit Stillman Comments About Recent Films Harvard Film Archive – The Complete Jean Renoir Episode Credits Aaron West: Twitter | Website | Letterboxd Jon Laubinger: Letterboxd Criterion Now: Twitter | Facebook Group Criterion Cast: Facebook »

- Aaron West

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‘Transit’ First Look: ‘Phoenix’ Director Christian Petzold Crafts Another Intriguing Identity Drama

12 June 2017 7:33 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

German filmmaker Christian Petzold has been making features for nearly two decades now, but it wasn’t until his last feature, the 2014 drama “Phoenix,” that he cemented his status as one of the top international directors in the world. Three years later, Petzold is back at work behind the camera for his new movie, “Transit,” and it appears he’ll be dabbling once again in the kind of identity mysteries that made “Phoenix” such a powerhouse.

Read More: Why ‘Phoenix’ Finally Makes Christian Petzold a New Arthouse Auteur

“Transit” is adapted from Anna Seghers‘ World War II novel of the same name. The story concerns a 27-year old German tasked with delivering a letter to a man named Weidel in Paris. He assumes the identity of a refugee named Seidler as he travels to Marseille, but he’s mistaken by the authorities as Weidel himself. It turns out the real Weidel committed suicide, »

- Zack Sharf

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The Works Boards Sundance’s ‘L.A. Times,’ Spy Thriller ‘The White Rabbit’

22 May 2017 5:07 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Worldwide sales rights to relationship drama “L.A. Times” have been picked up by The Works International, which is introducing the film and also upcoming World War II spy thriller “The White Rabbit” to buyers at Cannes.

L.A. Times” (pictured) premiered at Sundance this year. The film is from writer-director-star Michelle Morgan (“Girl Most Likely”).

Variety‘s review said that “L.A. Times” explores the lives of three thirtysomething Angelenos “with a heavy dose of Whit Stillman and sprinklings of Woody Allen, Noah Baumbach, and Lena Dunham, among others.”

The Works is also kicking off global sales of “The White Rabbit,” which is loosely based on the British spy who partly inspired the creation of James Bond, and follows the British Secret Service’s covert operation in occupied France. Filming begins early next year for delivery in winter 2018 and global release in early 2019.

Torquil Deacon and Tom Radcliffe penned the screenplay.

Related »

- Stewart Clarke

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Cannes Talk: Mike Goodridge, Protagonist Pictures

22 May 2017 11:09 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

 

Protagonist Pictures, which is in its 10th year, has a stable of auteur thoroughbreds, including two films in this year’s Directors’ Fortnight. Recent festival hits include “Lady Macbeth,” “God’s Own Country” and “American Honey,” with upcoming fare including Clio Barnard’s “Dark River” and Pawel Pawlikowski’s “Cold War.” Mike Goodridge, CEO of the U.K.-based sales outfit, talks to Variety.

What are the highlights of your Cannes slate?

We have two American films in Directors’ Fortnight, one is Chloe Zhao’s “The Rider,” and the other is Sean Baker’s “The Florida Project,” starring Willem Dafoe. They are both really exciting filmmakers.

[“The Florida Project”] is Sean’s sixth film; “Tangerine,” “Prince of Broadway” and “Starlet” are his most famous films, and this is the next step up if you like. It is really exciting that he has joined the Cannes fraternity because “The Florida Project” is a really accomplished piece of work. »

- Leo Barraclough

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Interlude in Prague Review

22 May 2017 10:48 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Stefan Pape

 

Upper class society in a period setting is ripe for ridicule; the outfits, the language, and just the sheer grandiosity of it all is so easy to caricature and be derisory about, and it’s exactly here Whit Stillman triumphed with his indelible drama Love & Friendship. It’s clear to see that John Stephenson is vying to thrive in a similar capacity with Interlude in Prague, except this kitsch melodrama falls flat thanks to a lacklustre screenplay, without that same sharpness and wit it requires to truly work.

Baron Saloka (James Purefoy) is a nasty, embittered, affluent member of society, who promises those around him he will fund a trip for the esteemed composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Aneurin Barnard) to the Czechoslovakian capital. And so begins a few turbulent months in the life of the prolific talent, as he falls for opera singer Zuzanna Lubtak (Morfydd Clark »

- Stefan Pape

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Montclair Review: ‘Avenues’ is a Charming, Scrappy Debut By Michael Angarano

19 May 2017 2:12 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a title that sounds a like a rehab facility, Michael Angarano’s Avenues is a spirited, micro-budget indie that recalls the New York City-based work of early Woody Allen with notes of John Cassavetes, Whit Stillman, and the Safdie brothers thrown in for good measure. These are excellent influences to aspire to, although the film’s narrative clutter and occasional missteps allow the scrappiness to show. Filmed quickly in a few days on the go, Avenues tells the story of Max (Angarano) as he mourns his bother Jack (who is never seen on screen) while passing time with his best friend Peter (Nicholas Braun), a sex therapist who has arrived in New York City for winter break. Peter is also about to break-up with his long-distance girlfriend who he’s en route to visit in Montreal.

With the entry of two blondes who just happen to be eating at »

- John Fink

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'Room' exec producer joins financier Catalyst

18 May 2017 11:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Former Ifb executive Keith Potter joins UK outfit.

UK film and TV outfit Catalyst Global Media has appointed former Irish Film Board executive Keith Potter as in-house executive producer of feature film projects.

Potter will be charged with sourcing commercially viable projects for Catalyst’s development and production slate and expanding the company’s national and international partnerships with filmmakers, agents, financiers and platforms.

Potter most recently served as project manager at the Irish Film Board, where he was executive producer on projects including Lenny Abrahamson’s Oscar-winner Room, Whit Stillman’s well-received Amazon pickup Love & Friendship and documentaries including Sophie Feinnes’ forthcoming feature on Grace Jones.

Catalyst’s upcoming films include romantic comedy Finding Your Feet, starring Imelda Staunton, Timothy Spall and Joanna Lumley and Ghost Stories, made in collaboration with Warp Films. The company also has a multipicture deal with Warner Music Group.

TV projects include drama Peter & Wendy and series Cognition, a neo-noir »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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The Cannes Film Festival Buyers Guide: Who’s Buying the Movies You’ll Watch

15 May 2017 1:02 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Buyers return to Cannes like swallows to the Capistranos, but this year they’ll find a hostile landscape. Too many buyers, too few titles, and streaming-service disruptors are driving up prices all the while, making North American prebuys increasingly necessary.

That’s hazardous terrain: Witness the Weinstein Company’s $6 million bid for transgender drama “3 Generations” (aka “After Ray”). Two years later, after a title change and poor reviews on and off the festival circuit, the drama starring Elle Fanning and Susan Sarandon finally received a May 5 release. Total domestic gross to date: $46,421.

That was in 2015, the last year that TWC held its then-annual dog-and-pony show for buyers and press at the Majestic Hotel. This year, like the last, they’ll hold court on their yacht, which also serves as their offices — still tony, but on a budget; it’s a lot less expensive than that prime Croissette real estate. Meanwhile, »

- Anne Thompson and Graham Winfrey

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The Cannes Film Festival Buyers Guide: Who’s Buying the Movies You’ll Watch

15 May 2017 1:02 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Buyers return to Cannes like swallows to the Capistranos, but this year they’ll find a hostile landscape. Too many buyers, too few titles, and streaming-service disruptors are driving up prices all the while, making North American prebuys increasingly necessary.

That’s hazardous terrain: Witness the Weinstein Company’s $6 million bid for transgender drama “3 Generations” (aka “After Ray”). Two years later, after a title change and poor reviews on and off the festival circuit, the drama starring Elle Fanning and Susan Sarandon finally received a May 5 release. Total domestic gross to date: $46,421.

That was in 2015, the last year that TWC held its then-annual dog-and-pony show for buyers and press at the Majestic Hotel. This year, like the last, they’ll hold court on their yacht, which also serves as their offices — still tony, but on a budget; it’s a lot less expensive than that prime Croissette real estate. Meanwhile, »

- Anne Thompson and Graham Winfrey

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Todd Haynes’ ‘Wonderstruck’: Amazon and Roadside Land Awards Season Release Date

3 May 2017 12:39 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Amazon Studios and Roadside Attractions will partner on the release of Todd Haynes’ highly anticipated new film, “Wonderstruck,” giving the film an Oscar-friendly October release date, Variety reports. The film premieres this month at the Cannes Film Festival and will hit U.S. theaters in limited release on October 20, followed by a wider release in November.

Read More: Cannes Classics 2017 Lineup Includes ‘Belle de Jour’ Restoration, Stanley Kubrick Doc and More

Based on the bestselling 2011 young adult novel of the same name by Brian Selznick (“The Invention of Hugo Cabret”), “Wonderstruck” follows the interconnected stories of two deaf children across the span of 50 years. Ben (Oakes Fegley) lives with his family in Minnesota in 1977 and escapes to New York, trying to find his father. Rose (13-year-old deaf actor Millicent Simmonds), a young girl locked in a house in 1927 New Jersey, escapes to New York to see her favorite film actress. »

- Graham Winfrey

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Jeff Goldblum & Danny DeVito To Basically Play Simon & Garfunkel In New Amazon Comedy Series

3 May 2017 12:15 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Much more so than its competitors, Amazon has established quite a clear brand identity. It’s not particularly concerned with being cool or edgy but instead focuses its attention principally on the sort of older crowds that tend to populate arthouse theaters and subscribe to HBO. Whether it’s their Woody Allen series, dad-faves “Bosch” and “The Man In The High Castle,” funding movies by people like Jim Jarmusch and Whit Stillman or making a TV show about an orchestra in New York, Amazon know where their bread is buttered.

Continue reading Jeff Goldblum & Danny DeVito To Basically Play Simon & Garfunkel In New Amazon Comedy Series at The Playlist. »

- Oliver Lyttelton

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Todd Haynes’ ‘Wonderstruck’ Scores Awards-Season Release From Roadside, Amazon (Exclusive)

3 May 2017 12:14 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Roadside Attractions is partnering with Amazon Studios on Todd Haynes’ “Wonderstruck,” Variety has learned.

The film will premiere this month at the Cannes Film Festival, where it will compete for the Palme d’Or. It will open in the U.S. in limited release on Oct. 20 and will go into wide release at some point in mid-November. The studios are giving the film an awards push and believe it could be an Oscar contender.

It certainly has some impressive pedigree. “Wonderstruck” reunites Haynes with Julianne Moore; the two previously collaborated to acclaim on “Safe” and “Far From Heaven.” It co-stars Oscar-nominee Michelle Williams,  along with Amy Hargreaves (“Homeland”), Oakes Fegley (“Pete’s Dragon”), and newcomer Millicent Simmonds.

Related

Amazon Signs First Look Deals With Bona Fide Productions, Killer Films and Le Grisbi Productions (Exclusive)

Wonderstruck” is adapted from a novel of the same name by Brian Selznick. It unfolds in two different time periods, »

- Brent Lang

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How Amazon and Ted Hope Are Trying to Bring Back the ’90s Indie Film Boom

2 May 2017 12:12 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Today, Amazon Studios announced it has signed an exclusive first-look deal with indie powerhouses Bona Fide Productions (“Little Miss Sunshine”), Le Grisbi Productions (“Birdman”) and Killer Films (“Boys Don’t Cry”). Amazon is already doing business with all three entities – it’s about to unveil “Wonderstruck” (Killer) and “The Only Living Boy in New York” (Bona Fide) at Cannes – and the news is yet another sign that the company will continue to finance high-quality independent filmmaking from some of the most revered American directors out there. But it also signals a key reunion of major figures from an earlier period — the nineties indie film boom.

Read More: 7 Filmmakers Turning Amazon Into An Art House Cinema Powerhouse

By formally reuniting New York indie film icons – head of motion picture production at Amazon Studios Ted Hope and Killers Films founder Christine Vachon – Amazon is almost singlehandedly using its deep pockets to reignite »

- Chris O'Falt

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Amazon Studios Banks on Indie Auteurs at CinemaCon Preview

30 March 2017 6:55 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

What a difference a year makes: Amazon Studios’ lunch at CinemaCon 2017 was packed. Not like last year. “We were a new studio brand who had released one movie and bought five at Sundance,” said Jason Ropell, Amazon’s worldwide head of Motion Pictures. “We were planning to release 15 movies. It was ambitious and pretty damned scary.”

It turned out exhibitors did fine with Amazon’s movies, especially Oscar-winning $47-million-grosser “Manchester By the Sea,” which was released by Roadside Attractions and is winding up its 19th week in theaters. Other hits included Whit Stillman’s Jane Austen comedy “Love & Friendship” (19 weeks) and Woody Allen’s “Cafe Society” (12 weeks), along with arthouse entries “The Handmaiden” (18 weeks), documentary “Gleason” and Asghar Farhadi’s “The Salesman,” which collected the Oscar for Best Foreign Film.

Ropell and head of movie marketing and distribution Bob Berney, who is well known by exhibitors, scored rousing applause whenever »

- Anne Thompson

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Amazon Studios Banks on Indie Auteurs at CinemaCon Preview

30 March 2017 6:55 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

What a difference a year makes: Amazon Studios’ lunch at CinemaCon 2017 was packed. Not like last year. “We were a new studio brand who had released one movie and bought five at Sundance,” said Jason Ropell, Amazon’s worldwide head of Motion Pictures. “We were planning to release 15 movies. It was ambitious and pretty damned scary.”

It turned out exhibitors did fine with Amazon’s movies, especially Oscar-winning $47-million-grosser “Manchester By the Sea,” which was released by Roadside Attractions and is winding up its 19th week in theaters. Other hits included Whit Stillman’s Jane Austen comedy “Love & Friendship” (19 weeks) and Woody Allen’s “Cafe Society” (12 weeks), along with arthouse entries “The Handmaiden” (18 weeks), documentary “Gleason” and Asghar Farhadi’s “The Salesman,” which collected the Oscar for Best Foreign Film.

Ropell and head of movie marketing and distribution Bob Berney, who is well known by exhibitors, scored rousing applause whenever »

- Anne Thompson

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